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3 1330 00210 8870 



FOR REFERENCE 

Do Not Take From This Room 



Andover Room 

R 
974.4b 
Annual report for the town of 

Andover, 1979-1984 






Memorial Hall Library 

Andover, Mass. 01810 




I-V1 ■ 



■Mi' 



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TOWN OF ANDOVER 









Annual 
Report 
for the 
Town of 
Andover 



1979 



(January 1, 1979 through 

December 31 , 1979) 

prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 

Chapter 40, Section 49 

of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

and Article II, Section Four 

of the By-Laws of the 

Town of Andover 




Board of Selectmen 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
01810 



March 11, 1980 



Fellow Citizens of Andover : 



A number 
democratic fo 
occurred duri 
year for your 
the Board of 
on February 1 
for reasons o 
before the an 
a replacement 
became Acting 



of events resulting from the flexibility of a 
rm of government as well as from natural phenomena 
ng the year 1979, making it another very active 

town government. Again, a number of changes in 
Selectmen occurred, beginning with the resignation 
, 1979 of the Board Chairman, Albert Cole, Jr., 
f health. Because of the short time remaining 
nual town elections, it was decided not to appoint 

for Mr. Cole and Vice-Chairman, Edward M. Harris, 

Chairman . 



At the annual election on March 26, 1979, Norma H. Gammon 
and Lawrence J. Sullivan were elected Selectmen to fill the 
existing vacancies, the former for a three-year term and the 
latter for the one-year remaining of former Chairman Albert 
Cole's term. At the same election, Selectman Susan T. Poore was 
re-elected to fill her own vacancy for another term of three 
years. Selectman Edward M. Harris was elected Chairman of the 
Board; James Abramson, Vice-Chairman , and Susan T. Poore, Secretary, 
for the ensuing year. 



Town Manager Jared S. A. Clark finished hi 
office in March. During the year a number of o 
changes designed to improve the functioning of 
ment were put into effect with the concurrence 
Selectmen. Among personnel changes resulting f 
departure of the Assistant Town Manager, Sheldo 
Mr. Cohen had been employed by the town in that 
August of 1973. Mr. Cohen, of course, had been 
Manager during the interim between the departur 
Austin, the former Town Manager, and the arriva 
manager, Mr. Clark. It was during this period 
Blizzard of '78 occurred. 



s first year in 
rganizational 
the town govern- 
of the Board of 
rom these was the 
n S. Cohen in May 

capacity since 

Acting Town 
e of J. Maynard 
1 of the new 
that the famous 



Natural phenomena wrought additional damage on the town 
in 1979 in the form of a flood resulting from the overflowing 
of the Shawsheen River. This flood brought about rupture of 
the town's outfall sewer in South Lawrence and only the greatest 
effort by the Department of Public Works and other elements of 
the town as well as a detachment of the Massachusetts National 
Guard preventedthe loss of the Riverina Road Pumping Station. 



Another 
efforts of th 
expenditures . 
on a bill to 
a policy that 
decision came 
to postpone t 
April 23 to M 
to a site for 
authorities t 
High School h 
only through 
Academy who o 
town that a r 
the Town Meet 



problem facing the t 

e Commonwealth to de 

Eventually, the Le 

limit municipalities 

would prevail for t 

so late in the spri 

he Annual Town Meeti 

ay 7, 1979. At the 

the Town Meeting du 
hat the Memorial Aud 
ad become structural 
the kindness of the 
ffered the use of th 
oom large enough to 
ing could be found. 



own was brought a 
velop a ceiling o 
gislature was abl 
to a 4% increase 
wo years . Howeve 
ng that it became 
ng from its origi 
same time a probl 
e to the finding 
itorium of the Ea 
ly unsafe for use 
authorities of Ph 
e Case Memorial C 
accommodate those 



bout by the 
n municipal 
e to agree 

over 1978, 
r , this 

necessary 
nal date of 
em arose as 
by the town 
st Junior 
It was 
illips 
ase to the 

attending 



Perhaps the most difficulty for the town administration 
has arisen from the action of the Legislature in establishing 
the ceiling already mentioned for 1979 and 1980 of 4% over that 
for 1978 for the tax levy on the one hand and the amount appropri- 
ated, less certain sums, on the other. In order to exceed those 
amounts, it is necessary for the Town Meeting to produce a two- 
thirds majority vote, rather than a simple majority on that part 
of the budget or on a warrant article which exceeds the 4%. 

The foregoing relates to some specific matters thought to 
be of special interest. The sections which follow contain more 
detailed relations of the specific problems which have faced the 
Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager and elements of the town 
government . 

The Board of Selectmen is always on the lookout for citizens 
with both the interest and the qualifications to serve the town 
on one of the many boards and committees formed of volunteers 
and upon which much of the work of the town government depends. 
Those who think that they fall into such a category should not 
hesitate to obtain the necessary form from the Town Hall and 
by completing the form and turning it in, enroll in the Town 
Talent Bank. The town needs you. 



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/^^thairman 



^S-UxJOCC 1 nD&L2i~ Secret 



Vice Chairman 
ary 




Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen held fewer meetings during the year commencing January 1, 197 
and ending December 31, 1979, than during 1978. Specifically, the Board held 22 reg^ 
lar meetings, 10 special meetings and 16 conference sessions. Some of these meetin 
involved other responsibilities of the Board such as its function as a Board of Wate 
Commissioners, or as Sewer Commissioners. A number also were held jointly with the 
School Committee, or the Planning Board, for example, in the interests cf coordinate 
action. Two meetings were held with the School Committee under the terms of the Tow 
Charter for the purpose of selecting and appointing a member to fill a vacancy on th 
School Committee created by the resignation of Casimir J. Kolaski. 

At the town election on March 28, 1979, Susan T. Poore was re-elected to a three-yea< 
term, Norma H. Gammon to a three-year term and Lawrence J. Sullivan to a one-year ted 
created by the resignation of Albert Cole, Jr. At its organizational meeting, Selec 
man Harris was elected Chairman for the year; Selectman James Abramson, Vice-Chairma 
and Selectman Susan T. Poore, Secretary. 

in accordance with its agreement with Town Manager Jared S. A. Clark, the Board has 
undertaken to evaluate his performance of his functions, the first such evaluation n 
being completed until early 1979. The Board found on that occasion that their expect; 
tions were easily met, if not exceeded, and reported themselves as individuals very 
pleased with Mr. Clark's performance. 

Among the troublesome problems faced by the Board during the year (over a period of 
years, in fact) was the matter of the licensing of gravel pits. The first of these 
for the year was a request for the extension of the permit of Mr. John DeLoury due t 
expire on February 13, 1979. Approval of this was strongly opposed by the Foster's 
Pond residents who produced an environmental impact study done at their own expense. 
As the DeLoury property was partly in the Town of Wilmington, a problem was intro- 
duced, that town having approved extension of its own permit. It thus became neces- 
sary to hold a public hearing on the matter which was scheduled for February 11, 197! 
Following that hearing, the Board determined that there was insufficient evidence to 
deny extension of the DeLoury permit which was then approved. 

Great difficulty was experienced by the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen in 
preparing the 1980 budget due to the activity in the Commonwealth of those who sup- 
ported the idea originally carried through in California of placing a legal ceiling 
on property taxes. It was the proposal of Governor Edward J. King to limit taxes on 
real and personal property for 1980 to the level of those for 1979. _ In order that 
such a limit be effective, however, it was necessary for the Legislature to approve 
statute calling for such tax limitation. By virtue of the delays entailed in pro- 
ducing such legislation, the Board of Selectmen, having set April 23, 1979, as the 
date for the Annual Town Meeting, decided at their meeting on March 28, 1979, to set 
the date for the meeting back to May 7, 1979, in the hope that clarification of the 
so-called "tax cap" might be achieved by that time. The bill finally passed by the 
Legislature and approved by the Governor was complicated in its nature, but basicall 
called for tax levies and appropriations not to exceed a 4% increase over those for 
the 1979 fiscal year, unless the Town Meeting approved such an increase by a two- 
thirds majority vote. 

As the result of a warm spell in January, the Shawsheen River overflowed its banks 
and a serious flooding condition resulted to the degree that the Town Manager declare* 
an emergency under Chapter 44, Section 31, G.L., and was authorized to spend up to 
$400,000 from available funds to make repairs to the town's outfall sewer which was 
ruptured at a sharp curve in the river in South Lawrence. The town came near to 
losing the Riverina Road Pumping Station which was only saved by the yeoman service 
of the Department of Public Works and others. 

At its meeting on January 29, 1979, the Board approved and signed bond anticipation 
notes totalling $500,000, of which $100,000 was for improvements to the Fish Brook 
Pumping Station improvement project, $150,000 additional funds for the School BuiJdar^; 






Program and $300,000 in a reissuance of existing notes. 

The Commuter Rail Study Committee was authorized to borrow $1,000 from the Selectmen's 
budget to conduct a survey of 2,200 homes in the town. 

Early in the year, the Final Report of the Audit of the town accounts made by Arthur 
Young & Co. for the period July 1, 1977, to June 30, 1978, was presented to the Board. 
The town's accounting records were found to be quite acceptable. 

By virtue of complaints of some of the town's businessmen, who had found the mail de- 
livery service resulting from the reorganized area Postal Service to be inadequate, 
talks were held over a period of time with George Walker , Area Director of the U. S. 
Postal Service, and others without success. Action finally resulted in a Board letter 
being sent to Senators Kennedy and Tsongas and Representative Shannon. 

Andover having been a defendant in a suit by the State for failure to carry out the 
terms of the direcrive to revalue the town on the basis of 100%, an article appearing 
in the warrant representing roughly an expenditure of $200,000 caused the removal of 
the town from the list of those being sued by the State. 

On March 28, 1979, the Board signed an Andover Housing Authority contract providing 
an additional ten subsidized housing units under the Federal Section 8 program. 

Selectmen Susan T. Poore was elected voting representative of the town to the new 
Massachusetts Municipal Association formed by consolidation of the Selectmen's Asso- 
ciation, the League of Cities and Towns and other similar organizations. 

The Board has been working for some time in trying to bring about construction of an 
interchange on Interstate Route 93 at or near Lowell Junction to serve traffic from 
the Gillette plant, Instrumentation Laboratories and other businesses in that area, 
thus cutting down on the traffic passing through Ballardvale and Clark Road, now very 
dense. Tewksbury is very much interested in this, also. In order to provide rein- 
forcement to these efforts, a meeting was held with local representatives and Repre- 
sentative James Shannon at the latter 's Lawrence office in April. 

The Board of Selectmen approved several actions put forward by the Town Manager to 
increase fees for licenses, permits and the like in order to make certain offices 
more nearly self-sustaining and at the same time assist in reducing the budget. 

A new Conference Room having been prepared in the Town Hall, it was agreed on April 
30, 1979, that the Conference Sessions of the Board would henceforth be held in that 
location rather than at the Water Filtration Plant on Lowell Street, as had been the 
past practice. 

• 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order in the Case Memorial Cage of Phillips 
Academy on May 7, 8 and 9, 1979, in view of the unsafe condition of the Memorial Au- 
ditorium of the East Junior High School. A quorum not being present on the 9th, it 
was voted to adjourn the meeting to the West Junior High School for May 14, 1979. A 
quorum then being present, the work of the Town Meeting was completed. 

On May 14, 1979, the Board signed bond anticipation notes for the cost of various im- 
provements to the town water system, $175,000 to the Arlington Trust Company and 
$200,000 to the Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company. 

Because of the deterioration of the water mains in Shawsheen Village and the com- 
plaints of the users, it was agreed that certain of the mains should be relayed. 

Selectman Susan T. Poore was appointed on June 4, 1979, to attend joint School Com- 
mittee and School Building Committee meetings which will re-evaluate plans for town 
school building needs. At the same meeting a reward of $50 was offered for return of 
the town flags which had been stolen during the adjournment of the Town Meeting at 
the Case Memorial Cage. The Town Flag itself had been a present of Phillips Academy 
and had cost some $450 to embroider with the Town Seal. 

The Board approved the issuance of Industrial Development Revenue Bonds under Massa- 
chusetts G.L., Chapter 40D, as amended, in an amount not to exceed $875,000 to enable 

4a 



Harris Environmental Systems to build a small plant in town. At the same meeting, 
was decided to go ahead with a Step 1 Study for development of a new sewer system it 
which Federal funds were available. 

On June 11, 1979, the Board held a hearing on George Chongris' petition for renewal! 
of his permit for his gravel pit on Blanchard Street. It also approved minor amend) 
ments to John DeLoury's gravel pit permit. In addition, it endorsed the petition ol 
the Merrimack Valley Planning Commission to be considered as an Economic Developmen 
District in order to qualify for Federal funds for various economic development 
projects . 

The Board took exception to the study produced by the Merrimack Valley Planning Com! 
mission under the provisions of the Clean Water Act of 1977 known as 208 Water Quail 
Planning. The funds provided for this area-wide planning were considered entirely 
inadequate for the purpose, and the results, therefore, could only be a wasteful exi 
penditure. The Board directed that letters for the Chairman's signature be sent to 
all agencies concerned representing this view. Subsequently, the MVPC came forward 
and agreed with the town's position. 



At its meeting on July 23, 1979, the Board, having authorized the sale of water to 
North Reading for a four-month period, agreed that from then on water would only be 
sold on an emergency basis, pending further consideration of the problem by the BoaJL 
At the same meeting, a reward of $500 was offered for information leading to the ar- 
rest and conviction of the vandals who polluted the Holt Hill Resevoir, necessitatii 
its cleaning and refilling. 

On August 7, 1979, the Board approved the sale of $2,185,000 water bonds, $1,270,00( 
sewer bonds and $185,000 extraordinary repairs bonds, dated August 1, 1979, in denoi 
inations of $5,000, each bearing interest at 5.10%. The sale price was set at 
100.00562. The same date, the Board approved a 507c increase in fees for all-Alco- 
holic Beverage Licenses, as well as other types of licenses. 

Acting as Sewer Commissioners, the Board at its meeting on September 10, 1979, ap- 
proved sewer connections for Intertel, Inc., and GCA Corp., both having bought land 
in the Industrial Park west of Rout 1-93 served by the main sewer bypassing the Riv- 
erina Road Pumping Station. 

Vandalism has been a continuing problem and thus matter of interest for the Board, 
and much time has been devoted to discussions of means of fighting this cancer in tb 
side of the town. Little progress has been made, however, in finding ways and means 
of coping with the problem. An assault on a female student resident of Ballardvale ' 
on October 20, 1979, which left the victim in a coma for a number of days as well as 
badly injured led the Board ot offer a reward of $500 for information leading to tha 
arrest and conviction of the perpetrator. $500 is the maximum amount a town may off 
fer in the way of a reward, and legislation has now been introduced to remove this 
ceiling. No results were obtained from this offer. At the same time, the Board su 
ported establishment of a fund to aid the victim's family with hospital bills and 
other expenses due to this assault. 

The October Town Meeting was held on Monday, October 15, 1979, at the West Junior 
High School. 

The Board earlier had discussed a proposal to contract for transportation services 
for the elderly and handicapped. At its meeting on October 22, 1979, it approved 
this concept. At the same meeting it discussed the maintenance of town buildings, jf 
eluding school buildings. It had been agreed between Chairman Harris and Elaine 
Viehmann, Chairman of the School Committee, that representatives of the two boards 
should be appointed and discuss details of a central maintenance organization. The 
Board of Selectmen elected Selectmen Poore and Abramson to represent the Board at 
these discussions. Members of the Finance Committee were to be asked to join with 
them. 

On November 13, 1979, the Board approved, in its capacity as Sewer Commissioners, a 
sewer connection for the Shawsheen Chemical Co. which would include a lift station 
which would be, however, within the building and maintained by the company, not the 

4b 



town. At the same time, it was agreed that the sewer failure on Lucerne Drive could 
:>nly be corrected by the acquisition of easements through a taking by right of emi- 
nent domain, over private property leading to Summer Street. 

[in the interests of energy conservation, the Commonwealth issued instructions that 
building inspectors would maintain supervision over public and private buildings to 
isee that temperature restrictions were being observed. No funds were provided. The 
hoard objected to this burden placed upon them and agreed to address t he Governor in 
[the interests of having the directive corrected or withdrawn. 

The matter of the proposal under the state statutes to extend the disclosure pro- 
visions of the state ethics legislation to municipalities was discussed by the Board 
it its meeting on December 3, 1979. State Senator Robert P. Buell had been present 
[it a previous discussion and noted the Board's opposition to this proposal which 
Ivould certainly discourage volunteers for town boards and committees as well as per- 
haps those holding salaried positions. It was agreed that a strong letter should be 
[sent to the State Ethics Commission setting forth the Board's views on this matter. 
f[n view of the capture of the U. S. Embassy in Teheran, Iran, and the holding of our 
iiplomats as hostages, it was asked that local churches be asked to toll their bells 
[it each noontime until the release of the hostages sometime in the future. The Board 
jigreed to ask this of the churches and of Phillips Academy. 



Irhe foregoing should give some idea of the activity of the Board during the year. 
|ias been even busier than last year. 



It 




INTERTEL BUILDING 
ANDOVER, MA 



Town Manager 



While many less visible changes were undertaken in providing for the general 
administration of the Town than the departmental reorganizations of calendar year 
1978, the events of 1979 are of equal significance in helping to develop the ability 
of the Town to provide efficient and effective municipal services. The implementatic 
of the new computer system is a major factor in reshaping the Town. Nearly all finar 
cial management practices have been reviewed and revised as appropriate. The police 
information system, fire command data base, property record information system and 
word processing applications all contribute or will contribute to increased municipal 
productivity. The computer is enabling all departments to obtain more information 
more quickly. 

The newly formed department of community development and planning in its first 
full year has clearly demonstrated its value. Nine new industries started facility 
projects in Andover . The review of all applications for development occurred in an 
orderly and timely manner helping to increase the tax base of Andover by 20%. The 
litigation between developers and town review boards has decreased. The issues of 
providing for quality development are now largely substantive rather than procedural, 
The existence of the department has helped to eliminate the frustration of the so- 
called "red tape" in any governmental review and permit approval process. Inspec- 
tions are coordinated and timely. 

The adoption of tax cap legislation created some difficulties for the management 
of the Town, but it also helped to produce several beneficial results. The tax cap 
forced a greater examination of the Town's revenue structure causing a shift of ap- 
proximately one dollar on the tax rate to user fees and charges. The management posi 
tion at the collective bargaining table has been strengthened. Central dispatching 
is being implemented as a cost avoidance strategy. Leaf collection which benefitted 
only a portion of the community was eliminated as a regular Town function. While it 
may not be possible to remain within the four per cent (4%) tax cap guideline during 
periods of double digit inflation and maintain the same level of services, the local 
option override has strengthened the review of Town Meeting in determining those 
services which the Town will and will not provide. 



The single most demanding responsibility of the Town administration has been 
working with the School Committee, School Building Committee, school administration 
and architects in redefining the school building program, A less expensive con- 
struction alternative to the facility replacement program being explored, a more 
rapid decline in the student population than projected and public resistance to the 
elimination of East Junior High caused a thorough reexamination of (1) student popu- 
lation projections, (2) the organizational structure of the school system and (3) the 
uses assigned to all school buildings. The effort trimmed projected total capital 
costs from $14M to $11 5M, One school has been eliminated from continued operation. 
The possibility of double sessions has been precluded. And, it may also be possible 
to address other community needs such as joint Town and School administrative offices 
in East Junior High, additional commercial space, reduction of parking congestion. 
The 1980 Annual Town Meeting will have the opportunity to review and vote upon these 
issues. Hopefully Andover will decide to complete its secondary educational facil- 
ities , 

The year was filled with the usual plethora of administrative details involving 
labor negotiations with four different employee groups, energy conservation, public 
works construction projects, the formulation of a master sewer plan and administrtive, 
policy proposals and the many other routine tasks associated with the running of the 
Town of Andover, Among these ministerial tasks and as a matter of bylaw I am pleased 
to report the following surplus items were sold: (a) three sheets of steel from the 
former police firing range in the basement of Town Hall at $50.00 plus removal expense 
and (b) tax acquired property identified as Lot 22, Map 83 at $350.00 plus expenses. 



Ill 



a: 



Finance & Budget 



The year 1979 witnessed the beginnings of the Department of Finance and Budget 
ind the recruitment of its first director in May, 1979. 

The area of municipal financial management and administration is rapidly in- 
reasing in complexity and concern as inflation continues to decrease the purchasing 
1 jower of the dollar, as taxpayers become more and more concerned that their tax 
~ iollars are spent efficiently and effectively, as the demand for public service re- 
gains strong, and as the complexities of intergovernmental fiscal recognition of 
these concerns and the foresight that managing the financial future of the Town 
'equires the coordination of sound in-house financial planning and control among 
the fiscal arms of the Town government; the offices of the Town Accountant, 
Assessor, Treasurer/Tax Collector, Purchasing Agent, and Budget and Finance, analy- 
sis of departmental budgets and financial operations and relationships with the 
."ederal, state and municipal governments. 

In late 1978 the Town Meeting voted the acquisition of a new computer system, 
i Digital PDP 11/70 and the licensed use of ADMINS software. This choice has pro- 
/ided a sound vehicle to guide us into the 1980s. With this computer system, the 
■ Town has moved into the forefront of town municipal data processing in Massachusetts 
inder the productive combination of ADMINS software, the municipal consulting firm 
)f MISTI, Inc., and the Town's in-house computer operator and Director of Finance 
md Budget. 

The financial management systems are in process of undergoing conversion and 
>verhaul to speed processing time, reduce clerical effort, improve accounting 
ind record-keeping procedures and provide for timely and meaningful financial, 

tatistical and management reports. During 1979, the following computerized, 

inancial applications were designed and implemented: 

PAYROLL - The payroll application was a conversion from the old NCR bookkeeping 
system. Payroll processing is much faster and the sizeable payroll data base allows 
or accurate retention of individual information and quick generation of a large 
lumber of internal and external payroll reports. 

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE - The accounts payable application was a conversion from the 

)ld NCR bookkeeping system. Similar to payroll, processing is faster and informa- 

:ion captured is much greater, assisting in recognizing vendor discounts and pur- 
chasing information and control. 

APPROPRIATIONS ACCOUNTING - This application was a conversion from the NCR 
system. This system provides two levels of control on a timely basis; the statutory 
ippropriations control responsibility of the Town Accountant and the budget manage- 
lent responsibility of the department. Program budgeting is a part of the software 
implication to be developed over the next several years. 

ANNUAL TOWN BUDGET - New application. The fiscal year 1981 budget was devel- 
>ped and produced on computer for the first time in the Town's history. The mechan- 
cs of budget preparation, budget review and editing were greatly simplified and a 
substantial amount of time saved which will enhance the control and ayalysis phases 
)f the budget process. 

The design of the water and sewer system was initiated in late 1979 and is ex- 
pected to be fully operational in early 1980. In addition to providing for a rapid 
ind accurate billing and accounts receivable section, the system will provide in- 
formation more easily obtained to assist in the analysis of water and sewer con- 
sumption, revenues and rates. 

is Much work remains to be done in the area of financial information systems over 
:he upcoming years and the Department is optimistic that improvements accomplished 
n 1979 will continue throughout the 1980s. 



Town Clerk 



At the conclusion of 1979, the total number of registered voters was 
15,029, divided among the eight precincts as follows: 

1 - 1765 5 - 2003 

2 - 1806 6 - 1874 

3 - 2016 7 - 1837 

4 - 1902 8 - 1826 

The following Statistical and Financial Reports are for the period from 
January 1, 1979 to December 31, 1979. 

VITAL STATISTICS 
Number of births recorded: 261 

Males: 136 Females: 125 
Number of Marriages recorded: 331 
Number of Deaths recorded: 212 

Males: 104 Females: 108 

Number of Dog Licenses sold: 2497. Total amount collected was $10,086.00, 
all of which was submitted to the Town Treasurer. Of this amount, $3,197.00 
was retained by the Town and the balance was sent to the County Treasurer. 

The number of Fishing and Hunting Licenses sold was 946. The total amount 
collected was $7,379.55. Of this amount, $216.05 was retained by the Town 
Treasurer. The balance was sent to the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Other Monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Licenses: $ 824.00 

Certified Copies 1,818.00 

U.C.C. 1,604.00 

Misc. Licenses 1,604.50 

A. B.C. Licenses 28,870.00 

Business Certificates 26.50 

Miscellaneous( Storage of 
inflammables, street 
lists, maps, etc) 3 , 185 . 56 

TOTAL 37,932.56 

Total monies collected were $55,398.11. Of this amount, $41,345.61 was 
turned over to the Town treasurer, $7,163.50 went to the Division of 
Fisheries and Game and $6,889.00 was sent to the County Treasurer for 
Dog Licenses. 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 

Under the terms of her will, the late Mrs. Margaret G. Towle, long-term resi- 
dent of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be 
held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 



Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this 
fund "be devoted to the assistance or the procurement of assistance for worthy per- 
sons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or support 
on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town 
Manager with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income 
from the Fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle 's will. The cases are 
referred to the Trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy 
and interested individuals. 






During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-one cases, dis- 
bursing $23,618.93 on approved cases which numbered seventeen. Only the income of 
the Fund is available. The principal of $345,825.50 and a substantial portion of 
the current income is invested under the direction of the Trustees. All disburse- 
ments are made by the Town Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 



Balance of Income as of December 31, 1978 $86,641.84 

Receipts - 1979 38,339.66 

$124,981.50 

Disbursements - 1979 23, 618. 93 

Balance of Income - December 31, 1979 $101,362.57 



Town Counsel 



During the year 1979, twenty new cases were brought against the Town of Andover, 

Ten cases were successfully disposed of, leaving a balance of sixty-seven cases 
pending . 

Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and Administrative 
Boards . 

Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials on thirty- 
three occasions. 

Town Counsel rendered in excess of ninety-eight informal opinions and had con- 
ferences with the Town Manager and with Town officials on an almost daily basis. 
Telephone conferences with various Town officials, which often resulted in the ren- 
dering of oral legal opinions, occurred on approximately two hundred and two occa- 
sions. 

Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meet- 
ings. 

During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed, 
and numerous deeds, easements, releases, agreements and betterment assessments were 
drafted, reviewed and recorded. 



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15 



Fire Department 



The Fire Department was established and is maintained by the municipality to 
provide protection to the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, 
explosion or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of 
this work, the fire fighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the 
highest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
concerning his work if he is to perform his duties efficiently and with minimum ri& 
to himself and to his fellow fire fighters. He should have detailed knowledge of 
the dangers arising from heat, smoke and explosion caused by fire; of the hazards 
presented by new industries, processes, and materials developed by science; of the 
construction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or stored 
in them; and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high pressures. 

The objectives of fire protection are to prevent fires from starting, to 
prevent loss of life and property in case of fire, to confine fire to the place of 
origin and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and 
dramatic action, has far greater appeal to people and fire fighters than fire pre- 
vention measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions and administrative 
"interference" with what are termed "individual rights." 



The Fire Department installs, repairs and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
comprising of approximately three million feet of wiring, both aerial and under- 
ground, and associated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the sys- 
tem. The Department operates from three stations - the Public Safety Center and th 
Ballardvale and West Andover substations. The Department's fifty-seven men utilize 
seven pieces of fire fighting apparatus. 



. 



At the present time, fourteen members of the Andover Fire Department are 
nationally registered Emergency Medical Technicians. All members of the Department 
have been trained in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation by two of our own members who 
are C.P.R. Instructors. All of the requirements of the new State Laws under the 
Department of Public Health have been met and the ambulance received a 
Massachusetts License in 1979-80. In addition, all members of the Department were 
trained to meet the State law's requirements of the so-called First Responders Law 
and during the month of June all received refresher courses in C.P.R. and were 
certified as of July 1, 1979. 

The "Jaws of Life" was purchased with monies appropriated by the 1978 Annual 
Town Meeting. It has proven its usefulness on many occasions to date. 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals and inns, as required by 
State statutes, were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper 
authorities. Public and private school fire drills and inspections required by law 
were conducted. Mercantile, industrial, church, garage and service stations were 
inspected and reports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to the owner/ 
occupants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In-service inspections 
were conducted from all three stations using radio-controlled fire trucks and full 
complement of fire fighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid storage and 
all such associated equipment were issued. Blasting permits, Model Rocketry permits 
and Fire Alarm permits were also issued in accordance with State laws. 

As in the past, the major cause of fire was carelessness. The misuse of 
smoking materials, children with matches and faulty electrical appliances and 
wiring all contributed to fires in the Town. 



16 






:. 



The Fire Prevention Program was conducted during the month of October. Once 
again this year, the Fire Department conducted an open house at the Central Station 
The response of the residents of Andover was overwhelming and made the endeavor 
highly successful. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



Service Calls 

Fires 

False Alarms 

Mutual Aid Calls 

<Vpprox. Value of Bldgs. 
Afhere Fire Occurred 

\pprox.Loss from Fires 

\mbulance Calls 

unbulance-Mutual Aid 
to Other Towns 

Vmbulance-Mutual Aid 
o Andover 

Jon-Residents Billed 
:or Ambulance Service 

'""uel Oil Heat Installation 
'ermits Issued 

ixplosive Use Permits 

iuilding Inspections 

'ire Drills Conducted 

'atalities from Fire 



'lammable Liquid and Explosive 
'ermits Issued 

Butting/Welding Permits 



1979 
(12-Month Period) 

2,028 

924 

71 

19 

$ 232,805 

$ 110,242 

1,03 7 

33 

41 



bandon Underground 
'ank Permits Issued 

'ireworks Permits 

ire Alarm Permits 

ocketry Permits 



3 08 

110 
10 

482 
82 

1 

14 
5 



2 

141 

6 



1978 
(12-Month Period) 

2,746 

730 

87 

44 

$1,965,759 

$ 135,599 

1,027 

43 

55 

313 

180 

19 

956 

107 



26 
5 



2 

98 

16 



1977 
(12-Month Period) 



2 


,186 




706 




79 




10 


$1,876 


,594 


$ 128 


,594 




811 



23 

108 

10 

791 

103 



28 
4 



2 

172 

11 



17 



Police Department 



During 1979, the Police Department had a few changes in personnel. After serving 
the Town for 42 years, 26 years in the position of Chief, David L. Nicoll retired. 
The Department still consists of the same number of sworn personnel - Chief, three 
Lieutenants, five Sergeants, 32 Patrolmen; thus making a total complement of forty-! 
one. 

There are 4 Reserve Police officers and seventeen Crossing Guards. The Depart 
ment has the same number of civilian personnel but did have a job classification 
change - two clerks, four dispatchers and one mechanic/maintenance man. The legal 
advisor position was dropped, but a new person as information specialist to operate 
the computer was hired. 

The year 1979 saw an increase of 70 burglaries over last year's figures, and it is 
anticipated that the Crime Prevention Program may help to reduce this increase 
by soliciting citizens' support and involvement. The most alarming issue in the 
rising cases of senseless and wanton vandalism was an increase of 238 over last yea 
figure of 734. Citizens tend not to consider this costly, but this vandalism costs 
the taxpayer and the homeowner a lot of money over the year. 

During 1979 there were 533 larcenies reported. The Police Department has had an 
average of 426 larcenies reported in the past five years. 

In 1979 there were 129 motor vehicles reported stolen as opposed to 99 in 1978. 
Due to the fact that Massachusetts has the distinction of having the highest motor 
vehicle theft rate in the country, it is not unusual that our rate has increased. 
The state has started a campaign to lower this rate by using stiffer penalties for 
convicted auto thieves and greater monitoring of the so called "chop shops" There 
were 160 bicycle thefts reported for 1979 which is 27 less than reported in 1978. 

Motor vehicle accidents were down 38 from last year ; 954 were reported in 1978 to 
1979's 916. There were 8,914 parking tickets issued in 1979 as opposed to 8,248 
in 1978. The police cars traveled 390,102 miles using 42,211 gallons of gasoline. 

During the year 1979 there were 36 persons charged with drug offenses, seven of 
whom were juveniles. Overall, of 465 persons charged with crimes, 74 were juvenile 

The following chart shows a comparison of police activities over the past five yeai 

1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 



Complaints 


4 


,927 


5 


886 


4 


,287 


5 


,040 


5 


620 


B & E 




331 




261 




207 




257 




327 


Larceny 




384 




501 




242 




473 




533 


Stolen Cars 




140 




95 




83 




99 




129 


Stolen Bikes 




175 




155 




117 




187 




160 


M/V Accidents 




754 




791 




829 




954 




916 


M/V Fatalities 




5 




3 




1 




9 




1 


Vandalism 








652 




271 




734 




972 


Mileage 


333 


,257 


360 


,024 


346 


,377 


355 


148 


390 


102 


Gasoline 


41 


,519 


41 


,669 


39 


,295 


39 


,603 


42 


211 



The year 1979 saw a few changes in both operational procedure and physical structui 
changes inside the police station. A new wall was constructed to separate the lot* 
from the dispatch area in order to supply fuel efficiency and add greater security 
to personnel inside. One female clerk was relocated near the front door to reliev< 
a portion of the workload from the dispatcher and desk Sergeant. The formulation 
of a comprehensive crime analysis program was initiated in preparation of the comt 
puter. The Department launched anaggressive Crime Prevention Program aimed at gen- 
erating citizen support in reporting suspicious or criminal activity immediately 
with stress on helping the Police Department help the public. 

18 



In 1979, Chief David L. Nicoll went on leave November 1 in anticipation of his re- 
tirement early in 1980. A new chief was selected and took charge of the Department 
in a temporary position of Acting Police Chief, having completed the requirement of 
the Civil Service Commission. 

The color of the patrol cars was changed from the traditional solid blue to a navy 
blue and white for higher visability. 



Civil Defense 



Andover Civil Defense acts as a liaison between the State Civil Defense Agency and 
the local government. Andover Civil Defense coordinates the activities of Town De- 
partments with the State's suggested plans and guidelines. The heavy rains and the 
quick thaw of ice and snow in late January 1979 caused flooding in certain areas 
in Andover. This caused many problems both to business and residential homes, but 
the biggest problem was the possible flooding of the sewerage pumping station on 
Riverina Road. The State agency supplied large pumps to assist. The State also 
supplied sand bags !"50,000) and then later was responsible for getting the National 
Guard to render Andover further assistance. By this assistance, Town employees 
were able to get rest. Further, the majority of assistance did not add additional 
cost to the Town. This assistance would not have been available as quickly and 
efficiently if Andover Civil Defense was not prepared, both physically and know- 
ledgeably, to request this assistance and having all required paper work completed 
and up to date. 

The auxiliary Police have increased their training and now meet twice a month. 

The Communications Section maintained their weekly meetings throughout the year. 

Both these groups were very beneficial during the flood problems and also rendered 
assistance to other Town departments throughout the year. 

The Director attended required meetings on both the State and Federal level. He 
also attended two three-day seminars during the year. 

One regular police officer was also trained by Civil Defense in problems occurring 
with the transportation of hazardous materials (nuclear incidents) . 

Along with the assistance already mentioned, the Town received another vehicle 
from Civil Defense and a new generator which is being used at the present time 
by the Fire Department at the Ballardvale station for emergency power. 

Andover presently has four vehicles obtained through Civil Defense and a large 
generator at no cost to the Town. In the interest of creating better communica- 
tions and cooperation among Town departments, this equipment is usually loaned from 
Andover Civil Defense to the department having the greatest need. 

Although Civil Defense has gone by many years without needing this extra assistance, 
the past two years have shown that it is a department that should be given more 
support, both morally and financially. 



CETA Program 



In 1979, more than 90 individuals held positions in Andover under programs of 
the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act. Funding for these programs under 
Title II PSE (Public Service Employment) amounted to over $133,700.00, and funding 
under Title VI PSE exceeded $85,000.00. Nearly 70% of the employees hired are 
Andover residents. 



19 



The employment level in Andover as of January 1, 1980 under the CETA program 
stood at 14. The State Office of Manpower Affairs has mandated that employment 
under this program not exceed eighteen months; therefore, there is a constant turn- 
over of people employed. The termination of present employees will not mean the 
termination of the CETA program itself. However, the Office of Manpower Affairs hasi 
instituted a 60% cutback in funding for Public Service Employment and increased 
funding for training and educational programs in the Merrimack Valley which will 
continue through fiscal year 1980. 

During 1979, a total of 10 town departments and 3 nonprofit agencies utilized 
CETA personnel to carry out useful and necessary functions. This was reflected in 
decreased operating expenses to the Town. The assignment of CETA personnel to 
departments and agencies in Andover is as follows: 



DEPARTMENT 

Andover Council on Aging 
Andover Housing Authority 
Andover Housing Authority 
Andover Housing Authority 
Department of Public Works 
Department of Public Works 
Department of Public Works 
Greater Lawrence Educational 

Collaborative 
Library 
Library 
Library 

Community Services 
Community Services 
Community Development 
March of Dimes 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
School Department 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Police Department 
Police Department 
New England Document 

Conservation Center 
New England Document 

Conservation Center 



Central Purchasing 



PERSONNEL 

Driver Custodians 
Clerk Typist/Bookkeeper 
Painters 
Social Worker 
Water Meter Reader 
Maintenance Men/Laborers 
Grounds keeper /Cemetery 

Clerk-Typist 

Librarian Aids 

Assistant Librarian 

Security Maintenance 

Grounds keeper 

Night Watchman 

Clerk-Typist 

Driver /Custodian 

Crisis Teacher 

Secretaries /Clerk-Typist 

Elementary Special Needs Substitute 

Secondary Special Needs Substitute 

Plant Engineering Aide 

Teacher's Aide 

Heating Mechanic Helper 

Painters 

Delivery/Van Driver 

Assistant Media Librarian 

Media Aide 

Switchboard Operator 

Painters 

CETA Coordinator, Staff Assistant 

Clerk-Typist 

Assistant Dog Catcher 

Mechanic Maintenance Man 

Bookkeeper /Clerk 

Archivist 



The Central Purchasing function (involving the Town Government and Public 
Schools) has now been on stream for approximately three years and for the most part 
is functioning smoothly. 

Starting with fiscal year 80 all bids are being numbered so that they can be 
identified by number, fiscal year, calender year, and department. This is being 
done so as to tie in with the computers. 



20 



Some examples of major bids put out by Central Purchasing in the calender year 
1979 and Fiscal year 1980 to date included; 

Blasting & Excavation - Corner of Jenkins Rd. & Parker Rd . - DPW 

Carpeting Bancroft School - School Dept . 

Cooling Tower Relocation - Bancroft School - School Dept. 

Data Communications System - School Dept. 

Visual & Hard Copy Printer Terminals - Data Processing Dept. 

Fincom Report & Special Town Meeting Warrant 

Reconditioning Football Equipment - School Dept. 

Guardrail - Steel Beam - School Dept. 

Gym Floors, Recoating - School Dept. 

Hydrants - DPW 

Intercom Console - School Dept. 

Laboratory Supplies - School Dept. 

Lucerne Drive Replacement - DPW 

Office Supplies - School & All Depts. 

Oil Burner Replacement - School Dept. 

Police Cruiser Collaborative Bid - Police Dept. 

Railroad Platforms - DPW 

Plastic Refuse Bags - Veteran Services 

Roofing - West Jr. High - School Dept. 

Roofing Repairs - East Jr. High - School Dept. 

Reroofing - Bancroft School - School Dept. 

Salt - DPW 

Special Needs Bus - School Dept. 

Surface Water Drainage - DPW 

Water Treatment Chemicals - DPW 

Water Meters - DPW 

Xerographic duplicator Paper - School & Town Depts. 

Sale of Timber - As recommended by the Conservation people and 

State Forester 
Small Pickup Truck - Police Dept. 
Draperies - School Dept. 

Rebid Home Economic Equipment - School Dept . 
Booklets - School Dept. 

In addition there have been a number of collaborative bids with different 
communities such as; 

Heating Oils for all Town and School Buildings 
Police Vehicles 
Road Salt 

During this period approximately 70 bid openings were held. 

The continued use of State Bids and contracts (allowed under Massachusetts 
General Law) has proven to be beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under Chapter 40, Section 4B of the Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 
political subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a wide range of goods 
and services. Andover Purchased rock salt for ice control on the streets in con- 
junction with seven other communities. Fuel oil for the heating of the Town and 
School Buildings is purchased in conjunction with three other communities. This 
procedure is being expanded in areas where volume procurement can show savings. 

It is not really possible to operate as a business but every effort is being 
made to operate in a businesslike manner. 

The office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for insurance coordina- 
tion and risk management for the Town of Andover (Town Government and School De- 
partment) . 



21 



Dog Officer 



Lost Dogs 
Dogs Found 
Dog Complaints 
Dogs Sold 
Administration Fees 

Fees from Dogs Sold 
Money Turned in to Town Treasurer 
Owners Contacted for Unlicensed Dogs 
Cats Turned in to Pound 
Various Dead Animals Picked up 
Impounded Dogs 
Number of Summonses Issued 
Amount of Fines 





L978 


1979 




147 


151 




67 


53 


1 


009 


2,803 




30 


22 

$3,425 
$ 66 


$1 


433 


$3,491 




750 


920 




90 


118 




435 


384 




169 


247 




116 


226 


$ 


869 


$4, 150 



Historical Commission 



The Andover Historical Commission had a busy and fruitful year in 1979. 
Working with the Massachusetts Historical Commission a project entitled "Andover 
Preservation Planning and Multiple Resource Nomination" was decided upon. This 
will be a continuation of the Historical survey started in 1976 and result in fif- 
teen volumes containing descriptions and pictures of seven hundred Andover buildings 
This plan will enable the Andover Historical Commission to assist actively in 
directing Town development and assure that Andover 's historical assets will be 
preserved. The commission will be working closely with the Planning Board and 
Community Development and Planning Department. This project was made possible by 
funds appropriated at Town Meeting and a matching grant from the State. The 
Massachusetts Historical Commission recommended that a professional preservation 
planner be hired. Twenty five people applied and seven were interviewed by the 
Andover Commission. Wendy Fronteiro was hired in December for seven months, at 
which time the grant expires. 

The Andover Historical Commission also went on record in 1979 as being opposed 
to the Dunkin Doughnuts franchise in Shawsheen. 



Veterans' Services 



The Department of Veterans' Services] operates under the provisions of Chapter 
115, General Laws of the Commonwealth. It provides financial assistance to needy 
Veterans and their dependents who qualify for such assistance. These benefits re- 
late to food, clothing, shelter and medical care. The greater portion of expendit- 
ures this year went for payment of mounting medical expenses and assistance to un- 
employed veterans. Services also include, filing for V.A. Compensation, pensions, 
education, hospitalization, rehabilitation, counselling, housing problems, Social 
Security, SSI, insurance, V.A. Loans and a variety of other areas. 

Veterans Benefits, under Chapter 115, is paid by the community of residence 
and reimbursed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts at a rate of 50%. Federal V.A, 
Benefits under Title 38 of the Federal Statue, paid directly to claimants and this 
reflects a great savings to local taxpayers. This office has worked diligently to 
reduce direct Town expenditures of funds in the past year and has obtained many 
thousands of dollars in Federal Funds for veterans and their dependents. 

22 



During 1979 a 9.9 percent increase in compensation payments to veterans with 
service-connected disabilities went into effect. This increase was also provided 
to dependency and indemnity compensation rates for surviving spouses and children 
of veterans who died of service-connected causes. 

New legislation known as the "Veterans Health Program Extension Act of 1979" 
expands the eligibility of veterans served by the V.A. outpatient clinics. All 
W.W.I, veterans are now eligible for outpatient care at the clinics for any dis- 
ability regardless of whether or not it is service connected. The new law also re- 
quires the V.A. to conduct a study of veterans exposed to defoliants, including 
agent orange, while serving in Vietnam to determine if they are suffering ill 
effects from the exposure. Vietnam Veterans concerned about agent orange exposure 
are urged to request a medical examination at any V.A. medical center. Also under 
the legislation the V.A. is now authorized to contract with local community based 
facilities such as half-way houses for the treatment of alcholic and drug problems. 

Chapter 115 also provides proper burial of the veteran with financial assis- 
tance if necessary. In addition the law requires that all veterans' graves will be 
properly cared for and decorated. The Veterans' Agent acts as Burial Agent and 
Graves Registration Officer for this purpose. During the past year forty-eight 
veterans died; sixteen World War One, thirty-one World War Two, and one Korean Cam- 
paign man. The dependents of all these veterans were assisted in making applica- 
tion for the benefits to which they were entitled, including a burial allowance of 
$450.00 or $1,100.00 as qualified, headstone markers, insurance, widows' and child- 
ren's pensions. 

Memorial Day and Veterans' Day Services are coordinated through this office 
with local veterans of the American Legion Post 8 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Post 2128. The graves of more than 1,100 Veterans interred in local cemeteries are 
decorated on those holidays with a new American Flag. This year a Vietnam Veterans' 
Service was held at the Ballardvale Green in honor of all veterans from Andover who 
served in the Vietnam War. 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 

The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was originated by Article 17, March 6, 1893 
Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the purchase of wood or 
coal for the worthy poor of the Town. Three trustees, chosen on a staggered basis 
by the annual Town Meeting administer the funds. 

Balance on hand, December 31, 1978 $9,634.18 
Income 1979 253.33 

Drawn 1979 

Balance on hand, December 31, 1979 $9,887.51 

Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center 

The Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center has received federal designation as a 

Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center. The Center will provide a full range 

of mental health services to the residents of Andover. Presently, these services 
include : 

- Emergency evaluation, a treatment for individuals in crisis situations. 

- Evaluation of need for hospitalization. 

- Counseling and psychotherapy to individuals and families, including special 
services for children, adolescents and the elderly. 

- Follow-up services for individuals requiring long term care. 

- Professional consultation to schools and public agencies. 

23 



The GLMHC is staffed by a full range of mental health professionals including 
psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses and counselors. Currently 
the Center provides services in two locations in Lawrence, with outreach services 
to the Town of Andover. It is looking for a location to serve the Andover resident 
more effectively and anticipate locating staff in Andover/No. Andover by September, 
1980. 

During the period January through December, 1979, the GLMHC provided services to 
907 Andover residents with a 676 client visits in addition to the consultations 
throughout the year to the school system. 



Memorial Hall Library 



Memorial Hall Library continued its steady increase as demonstrated by 
circulation and reference statistics. Counts taken of numbers of people entering th 
library on given days indicate that over 800 people receive some sort of service 
daily or a weekly estimate of over 5,000 - about 20% of the Town's population. 

Continued increases in the use of regular library services are going to cause 
severe dislocations of space/people/books, a problem which can only be alleviated 
by an addition to the library building. 

The need for a library addition is greater than ever before and will have to 
be addressed. The shortage of seating space (less than 60 chairs in the main area) 
is particularly obvious when 120 people come in from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. on the same 
day and another 123 people come from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. The current library space 
was considered adequate for slightly less than 100,000 volumes. Today 150,000 
volumes constitute an overflow in all sections. The parking, relieved for a few 
years by the acquisition of land, is now being used for other departments. 

The Children's Department held storyhours, authors' and illustrators' talks, 
visited school classrooms and invited elementary and nursery school classes to the 
library . 

Programs and projects varied more this year with many special displays and 
flyers. During National Library Week special honors were given to library users 
who enjoyed a measure of success from their prolonged library experiences. Menu 
displays and stargazing bulletins were just two of many. The Museum passes were 
popular and very well used. 

The ANSWERS service which started on a special grant was incorporated into the | 
Reference Department and continued to add to the number of information-seeking calls 
received daily. As a result of the ANSWERS service the library received the John 
Cotton Dana award - a national library public relations award. Staff member Owen 
Smith was responsible for the honors. 

The Friends of the Library were most supportive and enthusiastic and excellent 
volunteers continued offering their service. 

The Director served as a delegate (the only public librarian from Massachusetts) 
to the White House Conference on Libraries and Information Services. 

Staff changes to fill vacancies saw Ruth Hooten step up from Head of Circulatior 
to Assistant Director. Anne O'Brien filled the Head of Circulation position and 
Margaret Dempsey became Children's Room assistant while Stephanie Brooks became 
circulation library assistant. George Hurst was appointed to the custodial staff. 

Trustees Frederick S. Allis, Jr. and Ernest J. Costello retired after many 
years of outstanding library service; both served as chairman during their tenure on 
the Board. Replacements were Patricia Dye and Joseph Glasser. 



24 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



REGISTRATION 
OF BORROWERS 

BOOK STOCK & USE 
Vols, at end of 
reporting year 

Pbs . at end of 
reporting year 

Vols, added 

Pbs . added 

Vols, withdrawn 

Pbs. withdrawn 

Vols, circulated 
(including 
periodicals & 
pamphlets) 

INTERLIBRARY LOAN 
Books borrowed 
Books loaned 

AUDIOVISUAL 

Added 

Withdrawn 

Owned at end 
of year 

Circulated 

GRAND TOTAL 
CIRCULATION 

PERIODICALS & 
NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 

ACTIVITY GROUPS 
Adults 
Children 



Adult 



Juvenile 



Total 



1978 



2,568 



1979 



2,814 



1978 



757 



1979 



725 



1978 



3,325 



272,602 


276,149 


540 


571 


8,126 


9,588 


Re 


cords 


1978 


1979 


530 


499 


145 


137 


5,292 


5,617 


21,085 


22,058 




419,083 


1978 


1979 



110,323 110,471 



382,925 



Other AV 



1978 



1979 



8,174 10,144 



455 



158 
206 



PER CAPITA (based on est. 

town population of 28,500) 
Book Stock 5.60 

Circulation 15.85 



465 



130 
191 



5.29 
14.70 



1979 



3,539 



3,400 


117,904 


32 


,278 


32 


,857 


145,678 


150,761 


5,397 


7,066 


1 


,432 


1 


,672 


6,829 


8,738 


7,011 


6,218 


1 


,579 




906 


8,590 


7,124 


1,894 


1,857 




302 




434 


2,196 


2,291 


6,333 


1,714 


1 


,410 




327 


7,433 


2,041 


987 


188 




220 




191 


1,207 


379 



386,620 



25 



AVIS 

Considerable work was done on all the AVIS reservations during the year in 
order to improve their usefulness to the public. Of special note is the thorough 
cleanup done on Deer Jump Reservation, a two and a half mile long landholding 
bordering the Merrimack River in West Andover. A crew of CETA workers, eight al- 
together, cleaned up the shoreline and improved trails. Work started in late Marc 
and continued into October. One of the major tasks was to periodically spray poi 
ivy plants which dominated the undergrowth in several areas. An all-terrain 
vehicle facilitated this project by carrying a pump and a large reserve of araytrol, 
a biodegradable herbicide which kills woody plants. Trails were widened to a com-| 
fortable six to eight feet width for hiking and cross country skiing. Large amour 
of debris were removed from the river's edge and leaning trees cut down. Much ere 
is given to Claus Dengler, AVIS land management chairman, and Dave Batey, project 
director and warden of this reservation for their tireless efforts in this project 

Trail widening and marking was done through the Kelman-Holt (Skug River) 
Reservation off Salem Street during October. A well-marked trail system and a 
rugged bridge have been completed there. 

The annual cross country ski outing was held in cooperation with the Appala- 
chian Mountain Club in January. About fifty persons participated in the walk 
through the 183-acre Harold Rafton Reservation at this snowless time. Warm drinks 
and food were served at the end of the trail by Phil and Dot Dargie who have de- 
voted much effort to this popular annual event. 

The ninth annual canoe and kayak races on the Shawsheen River in early May 

were again fortunately favored with good weather. Canoeists were in the majority 

but several kayak enthusiasts also competed. Many family groups enjoyed the racea 

as spectators, picknicking on AVIS Shawsheen River Reservation at the terminal 
point of the event . 

A wardens' meeting was held in October at the Andover Inn, for the purpose 
of comparing objectives, airing suggestions and considering future developments. 
Several wardens reported on trail-building and other projects in progress on their 
reservations. Jim Johnson of the Andover Police Department discussed suggestions 
for law enforcement on AVIS lands. 

A pamphlet has been designed and printed by trustee Rachel Garcia which des- 
cribes the purpose and activities of AVIS. A sketch shows the broad distribution 
of the reservations throughout the town. It is available at Memorial Hall Library 
and is being distributed by the Welcome Wagon and some real estate agents. 

The AVIS map of Andover continues to be made available. It includes all newl 
acquired reservations, as well as a complete street list. On its rear face it giv 
detailed plans of our major reservations, with trails properly noted. It sells fo 
$1.00 and is available at Memorial Hall Library, Conservation Commission office, 
and several local stores. 

The annual dinner meeting in November featured a film "Floating Through Time," 
showing an expedition in Ethiopia. Following the program AVIS president Nat Smith 
presided at a brief business meeting at which two new trustees were elected, Eilee 
Reilly and Charles Gaunt. Retiring from the board were Louise Pike and David 
MacDonald, Jr. 

The Society reminds fellow townspeople that all AVIS lands are open to the 
public without charge, subject to suitable regulations given on signs posted at 
their entrances. Volunteer help in maintaining and developing the reservations 
is welcomed, and any person wishing to volunteer his services for this interesting 
conservation work may contact Claus Dengler, who is in charge of all the reservatl 

26 



The selection of the Andover Housing Authority by the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts to construct and manage forty (40) new units of elderly and handicapped hous- 
ing was the major accomplishment of this past year, 1979. 

On July 12, 1979 the Authority entered into a contract for Financial Assistance 
with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for construction of an elderly housing project 
containing forty (40) dwelling units. A reservation of funds amounting to approxi- 
nately one million two hundred and fifty thousand dollars (1,250,000.00) has been 
set aside by the Commonwealth to cover construction costs. 



Housing Authority 



On July 30, 1979 a contract for Architectural services between the Authority 
and Michael O'Shea Associates-Registered Architect, was approved by Secretary Byron 
Mathews of the Department of Community Affairs. Mr. O'Shea is presently drawing 
plans for the forty (40) dwelling units and a new community hall. The recreation 
hall will service the one hundred and twenty (120) tenants from the three (3) elder- 
ly projects, Chestnut Court, Granview Terrace and the new 667-4 development. 

In order that the Andover community would have a definite input into the site 
selection of the new project a Citizens Advisory Committee was appointed by the 
Andover Housing Authority Commissioners. The committee chosen from a group of 
talented and civic minded citizens includes the following- 
Mary Hamilton, R.N. Andover Public Health Nurse and Supervisor of Elderly Mini 

Clinics 
Isabella Hurst President-Chestnut Court & Grandview Tenant Assoc, also 

member Council on Aging 
Marge Bradshaw League of Women Voters- Educator, Housewife and Mother 
Edward Manning Past Executive Director of Andover Housing Authority (Ret.) 
John McAllister President-Frye Circle Tenant Association also member Council 

on Aging 
Thayer Warshaw Educator and Writer 

Harold Hayes Deputy Chief, Andover Fire Department 

Rhys Kear Andover Community Development Administrator 

The Town of Andover has absolutely no financial obligation in the construction 
or operation of this new elderly and handicapped housing project. 

The Andover Housing Authority, since its organization in June of 1948 has held 
regular monthly and special meetings at the Main Office, 100 Morton Street. During 
1979 there were eight (8) regular meetings and five (5) specials. 

Thomas Wallace, a member of the Andover Housing Authority for twenty-eight (28) 
pears was re-elected by the Townspeople to serve another five ( 5) year term. He was 
also re-elected by the Authority Members to serve as Treasurer of the Board. 

At the Annual Meeting of April 5, 1979, the following officers were elected for 
the coming year: Chairman, Winston A. Blake, Vice Chairman, Thomas P. Eldred, 
Treasurer, Thomas R. Wallace, Assistant Treasurer, Atty. Richard A. Savra,nn and 
Assistant Secretary, Mary Jane Powell. It is interesting to note the dedication of 
these elected officials who have compiled such an enviable record of service to the 
Community. Mr. Thomas Wallace is the senior member of the group with twenty-seven 
(27) years of service. Thomas P. Eldred has been a member of the Authority for 
twenty-four (24) years. The Chairman, Mr. Winston A. Blake has seventeen (17) years 
of continuous service. Attorney Richard Savrann has served for (9) years and Mary 
Jane D owell, the state appointed member, three (3) years. 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 176 elderly and 56 family units. These 
dwelling units are contained in the thirty separate buildings located at Memorial Cir 

27 



i: 



Chestnut Court, Grandview Terrace and Frye Circle. 

This year's average monthly rent in the elderly projects was $83.00 and 
$140.00 per month for the family project. As a result of these low and moderate 
charges, the expenses which are accrued by the Authority are met by a combination 
of rental income and a Commonwealth contribution. The Town of Andover has no 

financial obligation. 

. 
As the private housing sector continues to experience high maintenance and 
utility costs which must be reflected in higher rents, the Authority must face the 
increasing volume of pending applications from family and elderly Town residents 
who find it ever more difficult to locate housing within the realm of their income. 

The waiting list for public housing units in Andover consists of 274 elderly 
applications, and there are approximately 96 applications for family units. 

There are three (3) Tenant Organizations representing all four (4) housing 
projects in Andover. The Modernization Program which has proven very successful 
in our older projects is regulated by the Department of Community Affairs and pro- 
vides for an involvement in management objectives by the Tenant Organizations. 
Active participation by our T e nant groups has had a marked effect on the moderniza- 
tion work that has been completed as well as projects that are currently underway. 
During 1979, in Memorial Circle, fifty-six '56) new storm doors have been installed 
and plans for new insulation have been completed. Cement steps have been replaced 
and repaired. Fifty-six (56) lavatories and lights have been installed in the bath- 
rooms. In Chestnut Court forty (40) new range hoods have been installed and forty 
new gas stoves have been purchased. New high powered injector water pumps have 
been installed to assist in the disposal of sewage water into the Town water system 
In Grandview Terrace, additional electric service has been installed to carry the 
power needed for the latest modern appliances. 

Section 8 - Housing Assistance Program-HUD- Federal 

This Federally subsidized program permits applicants to live in private ac- 
commodations paying approximately 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent. 
The Authority makes up the difference which is payable directly to the landlord. 
The Town of Andover receives full taxes from the participating property owner. 

All of the forty-four units (36 elderly and 8 family) allocated to the Andover 
Housing Authority are under lease. This popular program has a waiting list of 150 
applicants. An application for fourteen (14) more units is presently on file with 
the Federal Government. 

Chapter 707-Department of Community Affairs 

This state subsidized program is a carbon copy of the Federal Section 8 Pro- 
gram. It was during 1978 that this program was first implemented by the Andover 
Housing Authority. There are sixty (60) applicants on our waiting list. 

This Authority has just ten units (5 elderly and 5 family) under lease but 
the program is very popular and more units will be applied for when there is 
further call for applications by the Department of Community Affairs. 

VETERAN PROJECT 200-1 



This project, now in its 29th year of occupancy, is a 12 building complex located 
at Memorial Circle near Chestnut and Morton Streets. There are 56 two, three 
and four-bedroom units. 

The yearly income limits are: 



28 



For Admission 



Two Persons 
Three persons 
Four persons 
Five persons 
Six persons 
Seven persons 
Eight persons 



$6,300 
6,800 
7,300 
7,700 
8, 100 
8,400 
8,700 



For Continued Occupancy 

$8, 190 

8, 840 

9,490 
10,010 
10,530 
10,920 
11,310 



Income limits may be raised during 1980, 



Six new families moved into the project this year and two families moved onsite, 
The average monthly rent is $130.00. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses: 



INCOME 



Rents and Interest 
State Aid 

Total Income 



$86,703.50 
23,400.70 

$110, 104.20 



EXPENSES 

Administration $10,895.17 

Utilities 60,287.96 

Maintenance & Labor 17,099.77 

General Expense 8,427.41 

Reserve & Debt Service 23,400.70 
Total transferred from Surplus 10,006.81 

Total Expense & Surplus $110,104.20 

FRYE CIRCLE, GRANDVIEW TERRACE AND CHESTNUT COURT PROJECTS 667-C2 



The Elderly Housing Project, Andover 667-C2, consist of 176 one-bedroom units. The 
yearly income limits are: 



For Admission 



One person 
Two people 



$6,000 
6,300 



For Continued Occupancy 

$7,800 
8,190 



Income limits and asset limits may be raised in 1980. 

The average monthly rental is $75.00. 

In the last 12 months, 24 tenants moved into these projects and one moved within 
the projects. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses for these Elderly 
Projects for the last 12 months; 



INCOME 



Rents and Interest 
State Aide 



$184,061.77 




EXPENSES 

Administration 

Utilities 

Maintenance and Labor 

General Expense 
Total Expense 
Residual receipts 



$28,682.02 
90,209.16 
43,097.57 
10,211.34 
$172,200.09 
11,861.68 
Total Expense and Surplus $184,061.77 



29 



Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School 



INTRODUCTION 



The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
School is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to Es- 
tablish a Regional Vocational School District. Participating communities in the 
Region are the City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 

The content of the Annual Report under the terms of the Agreement is to contair 
a detailed financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current year 
Further, it is required that for each budget period there be included a statement 
showing the method by which the annual charges assessed to each member community 
were computed. 

Lastly, along with statistical and financial date, the Regional School Com- 
mittee may add such additional information relating to the operation of the 
Regional School as deemed necessary or appropriate. 

REGULAR DAY SCHOOL 



GRADE 


9 


ENROLLMENT 
10 11 


OCTOBER 1, 
12 13 


1978 

PG 
14 I 




PG 
II 


Pre- 
Voc 


TOTAL 


MUNICIPALITY 
ANDOVER 


16 


30 


21 


25 


4 


9 




2 


6 


113 


LAWRENCE 


371 


359 


305 


253 


31 


10 




4 


1 


1334 


METHUEN 


99 


86 


84 


75 


14 


3 




3 


2 


336 


NORTH ANDOVER 


23 


23 


13 


24 


7 


3 




1 


2 


96 






GRADUATES 


JUNE 1979 










GRADE 12 

GRADE 13 

GRADE 14 

POSTGRADUATE 

LPN 

TOTALS 


NUMBER 

GRADUATED 

368 

14 

6 

17 

33 

438 




NUMBER 

PLACED 

302 

14 

6 

15 

29 

366 


ARMED 

SERVICES 

13 









13 




HIGHER 
EDUCATION 
53 

2 

4 

59 


Courses avai 


lable f 


or Regul 


ar Day 


Students 


(1978- 


-79) 





Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Auto Body Repair 

Automotive Repair 

Carpentry 

Clothing and Modeling 

Commercial Art 

Culinary Art 

Data Management 

Distributive Occupations 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Health Service 

Heavy Equipment 



Home Management 

Machine Shop 

Major Appliance Repair 

Metal Fabrication 

Painting and Decorating 

Pipef itting 

Plant Maintenance 

Radio and T.V. 

Small Engine 

Upholstery 

Cosmetology 

Dental Assistant 

Licensed Practical Nurse 

Physical Therapy Assistant 

30 



EVENING SCHOOL STATISTICS 
SCHOOL YEAR 1978-79 

PARTICIPATION BY PROGRAM 

COURSE MALE 

Trade Extension 232 

Preparatory 563 

Evening Practical Arts 83 

Novice 43 

Apprentice 37 

Total 958 

PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES 
CITY OR TOWN 

Lawrence 426 

Methuen 282 

Andover 110 

North Andover 63 

Massachusetts Non-Resident 54 

New Hampshire 23 

Total 958 

INDUSTRIAL ENTRY ENROLLMENT 1978-79 
PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES 

Andover 30 

Lawrence 92 

Methuen 65 

North Andover 29 

No School 6 

Total 222 

SVMMER SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 1978-79 (SUMMER 1978) 
PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES 

Andover 68 

Lawrence 189 

Methuen 57 

North Andover 17 

Non-resident 2 

Total 333 



PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 



FEMALE 
35 
217 
208 
154 
3 
617 



262 
218 
63 
41 
21 
12 
617 



11 

53 
26 
33 

6 
129 



40 
123 

49 

24 



236 



STUDENTS 


PERCENT 


OF 


NEW CO-OP 


EMPLOYED 


SENIOR CLASS 


AGREEMENTS 


317 


86% 




46 


338 


92% 




14 


350 


96% 




7 


352 


977c 




4 


345 


97 r ; 




10 


345 


97% 




5 


347 


98% 




12 


350 


95% 




5 


358 


98% 




25 



TOTAL 
267 
780 
291 
197 
40 

1,575 



688 

500 

173 

104 

75 

35 

1,575 



41 
145 
91 
62 
12 
351 



108 
312 
106 
41 
2 
569 



September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

June 

As of graduation day in June, 1979, over ninety-eight percent of the 
senior class had received employment. The business firms with Cooperative 
Work Agreements with the school numbered 931, an increase of 128 companies 
within one year. 



31 



FACILITY USE 



Following a policy adopted when the school was built, the school premises h 
been made available to organizations within the region who desire to make use of 
the school's varied facilities. 



a\ 



Statistics maintained during the school year 1978-79 show the following usa 

Total hour 
Facility Used Organization of use 

Lectorium Mass. Department of Education 24 

" Northeastern Retail Lumbermen's 18 

" Greater Lawrence Chapter N.O.W. 16 

" Mailman Classes 15 

" Merrimack Valley Council of Youth Services 8 

" Elder Services of Merrimack Valley 7 

" Health Coordinators' Council 7 

" Photographic Society ofAmerica 5 

Total Hours of Use 100 

Classroom 208 Merrimack Valley Health Planning Council __2 

Total Hours of Use 2 

Classrooms 109 Association of Ma . Assessors 4_2 

and 110 

Total Hours of Use 42 

RT 1 and 2 St. Robert's Youth group 4 

Ratheon Classes 180 

Total Hours of Use 184 

Library Mass. School Lunch program 13 

" Mass. Department of Education 1^ 

Total Hours of Use 25 

Cafeteria Pep Club Dances 120 

Culinary Arts Banquets 150 

Stamp Club Show 20 

Total Hours of Use 290 



ge 



Softball Field 



Total Hours of Use 



Bolton Emerson 

W.C.C.M. 

Lawrence Rotary Club 

Bucko's Tavern 

Nassar Ford 

Lincoln Foods 

Boys Club 



40 
36 
60 
42 
26 
36 
90 
330 



Tennis Courts 



Lawrence General Hospital 
Western Electric 
Raytheon Company 
Internal Revenue Service 



30 
60 
10 
38 



Total Hours of Use 138 



Gymnasium 



Girls City Basketball 

Andover xouth Basketball 

Greater Lawrence Floor Hockey 

St. Robert's Youth Basketball 

Modicon 

Shamrocks 

Raytheon Men's Basketball 

Marilyn's School of Gymnastics 

International Order of Rainbow Girls 

Woolworth Employees 

Caldor Employees 



32 

100 

29 

55 

4 

5 

14 

8 

7 

22 

24 



32 



.31 



9 



Total Hours 

Facility Used Organizat ion of Use 

Gymnasium Lawrence Recreation Department 230 

Boys Club 100 

Total Hours of Use 630 

Pool Boys Scouts of America 52 

Church Youth Groups 39 

Cub Scouts 13 

Andover Recreation Department 100 

Jewish Community Center 12 

Easter Seals Society 20 

Camp Chispenee 36 

Adult Special Services 27 

Greater Lawrence Collaborative 39 

Andover Bible Chapel 2 

Methuen High Organization 4 

Methuen Recreation Department 12 

North Andover, Andover Girl Scouts 13 

American Heart Association 4 

Methuen Youth Hockey 6 

American Field Service 2 

Boys Club 90 

Regional Vocational School Faculty 60 

Total Hours of Use 531 

Football Field Lawrence Pop Warner League 70 

Total Hours of Use 70 

Baseball Field Merrimack Valley Senior Babe Ruth League 162 

Total Hours of Use .* 162 

Practice Soccer Portugese-American Youth Teams 60 

Field 

Total Hours of Use 60 

COMBINED TOTAL HOURS OF USE 2 , 564 



33 



FISCAL YEAR 1979 APPROVED BUDGET 
July 1, 1978 - June 30, 1979 

General Control $ 132,923 
Expense of Instruction: 

Day School 2,998,241 

Evening School 142, 678 

Total Expense of Instruction 3,140,919 

Auxiliary 188,046 

Cost of Transportation 203,414 

Operation of Plant 557,807 

Maintenance of Plant 312,612 

Special Charges 313,728 

Miscellaneous 164,304 

Outlay 119,510 

Debt Retirement and Service 531,880 

GRAND TOTAL 5,665,143 

FUNDS FOR REDUCTION 

School Building Assistance Bureau 276,919 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 111,895 

P.L. 90-576 -0- 

P.L. 81-874 6,390 

Chapter 70 2,372,051 

Other Funds 400,000 

Chapter 71, Section 16D Funds 794,955 

Special Education 58,332 

Chapter 71, Section 16D FY 78 Deficiency 192,964 

Payment 

Total Funds For Reduction 4,213,506 

NET TOTAL 1,451,637 

BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 

Total Payment August 1 Payment 2 Payments 1 Payment 

Andover $124,507.26 $ 48,122.80 $ 25,461.48 $ 25,461.50 

Lawrence 887,428.67 377,521.32 169,969.11 169,969.13 

Methuen 350,787.92 145,045.64 68,580.76 68,580.76 

No. Andover 88,913.15 35,924.52 17,662.87 17,662.89 

Note: Special Education $113,285 



34 



FISCAL YEAR 1980 APPROVED BUDGET 



July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980 



General Control 

Expense of Instruction 

Day School 3,246,158 
Evening School 81,815 

Total Expense of Instruction 

Auxiliary 

Cost of Transportation 

Operation of Plant 

Maintenance of Plant 

Special Charges 

Miscellaneous 

Outlay 

Debt Retirement and Service 
GRAND TOTAL 



140,651 



3,327,973 
190,103 
250,881 
565,054 
349,737 
309,388 
68,663 
119,510 
514,160 
$ 5,836,120 



FUNDS FOR REDUCTION - Estimated 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 

P.L. 81-874 

Chapter 70 

Occupational Ed. 2,190,188 
Low Income 59,295 

Special Ed. 79,424 

Evening School 43,144 

Other Funds 

Chapter 71, Section 16D Funds 
Total Funds For Reduction 

NET TOTAL 



276,919 

111,895 

14,157 

2,372,051 



400,000 

987,919 

4,162,941 

$ 1,673,179 



71.3% 
28.7% 



BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 



Total Payment 

$ 153,932 

1,052,430 

366,427 

100,390 



4 Equal Payments 

Aug. 1, 1979, Dec. 1, 1979 

April 1, 1980, June 1, 1980 

$ 38,483.00 

263,107.50 

91,606.75 

25,097.50 



Note: Special Education $233,488 increase of $120,203 or 103% from FY 79 



35 



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36 



Community Services 



The Department of Community Services experienced a completion of the cycle of 
constant change which had characterized its existence for the previous two years. 
In January, Joan Pearson, who had been Acting Director since May, 1977, became 
Director of the Department. Mary Schelling, who had been Program Assistant, became 
Porgram Coordinator for Educational and Enrichment activities in April. The 
Department's administrative positions were finally complete. 

In addition to the full complement of Departmental programs, much of the early 
part of 1979 was devoted to preparation for the Spring Town Meeting warrant article 
on the rebuilding of Recreation Park Lodge,- which burnt down in July, 1978. The 
staff worked with a sub-committee of the Community Services Committee as well as 
Peter Samaris, an architect who devoted volunteer time to this project. The lodge 
was a well-liked, heavily-used structure which served as the only support facility 
to Andover's only multi-purpose park. The tie-in to the sale of the Cardinal 
Cushing gymnasium combined with the tax-cap legislation requiring a 2/3 vote of 
Town Meeting resulted in failure of the passage of this article. 

The Department offered a wide variety of programs throughout the year. Over 
150 classes, workshops and special events were featured in the winter program 
(January) and the fall program (September). 

The spring mini program had a small array of the most popular adult courses 
while the summer booklet emphasized special interest programs for youth in addition 
to various playground programs. 

In an effort to remain vibrant by continually striving to meet current needs 
and interests, the Department is constantly reassessing program offerings. The 
popularity of the new Ski Touring Workshop was not diminished even by the lack of 
snow. Collaboration with Fidelity House, a drop-in center for special needs people, 
began in February. A combination of ever popular dance and always necessary 
exercise became a hit Jazzercise class. Adult tap dancing was a new venture as well. 
In addition to open swimming, the new lessons for non-swimming adults was well 
received. An old favorite, Cribbage, and the new rage, Backgammon, provided a series 
of exciting Challenge Nights. The sleigh ride turned into a hay ride but was just 
as enjoyable. 

While new replaced some old, the winter program would not have been complete 
without the many traditional special events including ski trips for Junior and 
Senior High students to Sugarloaf; Bradford Ski Program; Bruins and Celtics trips; 
the Gymnastics Meet; the Volleyball, Table Tennis and Floor Hockey Tournaments; and 
other annual Department activities. 

Over 1,800 individuals signed up for winter classes; special events included 
more than 800. An additional 4 - 600 people of all ages participated weekly in the 
various year-round open gyms. The Cultural Series again offered the arts in a 
social atmosphere bringing nearly 1,000 people to its programs. One-time workshops 
have been extremely popular for children and adults. The children's holiday-oriented 
workshops were all oversubscribed. 

Spring events included the annual Crafts In The Park, co-sponsored with A.F.S.; 
the annual Kite Flying Contest; bike race and numerous tennis classes. 

Six summer playgrounds offered diversified activities to over 1,000 children 
in grades K-8 . Nearly 800 participated in playground enrichment classes. The 
popularity of the pre-school program necessitated offering it at two locations 
simultaneously, giving over 150 youngsters an opportunity to enhance socialization 
skills prior to entering school. Due to the lack of a support facility at Recrea- 
tion Park, the special needs summer program was held at the Greater Lawrence 
Vocational School. Though a very competent staff gave the 35 children an enriching 

37 



experience, the atmosphere and facilities were just not comparable to what had been 
provided for the past 10 years. 

A big new venture in youth programming was the production of a Town musical 
Bye Bye Birdie. Over 100 people, mostly youth and families, were involved in this 
successful event which was supported in part by a local bank. 

Another first was a concert held at Pomps Pond. As part of the regular series 
of summer concerts, two were scheduled for a Sunday afternoon at the pond. Though 
the first one was enjoyed by 200, the second had to be cancelled when the entire pond 
was closed down. 

• 

In mid-August, the Department was informed that an algea growth in the water 
called Anabaena necessitated a complete end to swimming for the summer season. 
Fortunately, lessons were nearly completed, but it was a disappointment for all. 

One of the most popular youth programs has been the Hampton Beach shuttle. Due 
to the overwhelming popularity of this activity, the number of bus trips doubled, 
bringing 150-200 teenages to the beach every week. 

As always, the Department was actively involved in July 4th preparations, and 
the playground staff ran the game booths and the sports competition. 

Children's performances were held in various locations which were attended by 
about 500 families. 

Other summer activities included the Middle Essex Girl's Softball and Men's 
Softball Leagues; movies in the park; an array of tennis programs; gymnastics; soccer 
girl's and boy's basketball clinics; track meets; outdoor adventure program; Red Sox 
Family Night and Bike Nights. 

The fall program had new programs again focusing largely on youth. The movie 
series had over 500 attendees. The Department's first annual Haunted House was 
visited by over 100 children and parents who dared to enter. New classes such as 
Akido and Exercises for Expectant Mothers helped keep a wide range of residents in 
shape. In cooperation with Greater Lawrence agencies, the Department took part in 
a new VIP series. 

The traditional fall special events attracted 150 runners to the Foot Race, and 
30 youngsters raced in the Andy 500 while 200 looked on. A trip to Sturbridge 
Village was a family venture. In conjunction with Andover's Artists Guild, Art In 
The Park was held in early October. A multitude of pre-school workshops and classes 
were offered to meet the constant demand for this age group. The first Cultural 
Series event was offered in November and' totally supported by a local bank. 

I 

In addition to the above, regular classes and workshops had over 2,500 enrolleci 
This program was again coordinated with the Phillips Academy Evening Study Program. 

The new fiscal year brought a mandate for substantially increased revenues. 
While the overall statistical picture is good, there were noticable decreases in 
certain levels of participation attributable to new or increased user fees. 

Two problem areas throughout the year were the truck, which continually broke 
down, and the increased vandalism. The latter was costly but the lack of adequate 
maintenance help made it an even greater problem. The lack of a lodge at Recreation 
Park created another problem regarding maintenance and vandalism. With a recently 
widened roadway and no consistent large group activity in the lodge to protect the 
area, the teens turned the roadway into a massive gathering place for constant 
partying. 

Regarding the issues of youth and partying, the Department was involved in two 
committees - Drug and Alcohol Task Force and Youth Needs Study Committee. Question- 
naires were distributed by each to assess needs and problems. The former committee 
was a joint effort with the League of Womeri voters and the School Department; the 
latter was conducted by a sub-committee of the Community Services Committee. 

38 



The Community Services Committee also undertook a comprehensive study of all 
nunicipal buildings directly or indirectly under the supervision of the Department. 
Various committee members were also part of the Fields Maintenance Committee and 
the Cardinal Cushing Study Committee, on both of which the Director served as well. 

Other committees on which Department personnel served were Health Ed Advisory, 
\ndrew Sartory Memorial Fitness Trail Project, Massachusetts Community Ed Advisory 
Board, National Community Ed Program, Cultural Series, Council on Aging and Fourth 
if July. 

The Department received two honors during the year. The Sports Foundation 
jave an Award of Merit. The Department received a plaque for this. The State 
Department of Education chose Andover's program as one of 5 featured program models 
Df Community Education in the State on which they based a comprehensive Action 
landbook of Community Education in Massachusetts. 

:OUNCIL ON AGING: 



The Council on Aging coordinates and carries out programs designed to meet 
the needs of Andover's aging population in coordination with the Department of 
Community Services, Division of Elder Affairs. 

The five core responsibilities of the Council on Aging are: 

1. To promote individual input in seeking support for elder services 
through legislation, grant proposals and input in policy making; 

2. To identify the needs of the community's elderly population and available 
resources to meet such needs; 

3. To educate the community at large in the needs of the elderly; 

4. To design, promote and implement needed services and to coordinate with 
existing services for the elderly; 

5. To be the local catalyst for the Area Agency on Aging network of 
services . 

The Council on Aging operates the Andover Senior Citizens Center located on- 
the first floor of the Theatre Building at 11 Essex Street. The Senior Center 
Dffers a wide variety of social, recreational, health and counseling services for 
\ndover's residents age sixty and older. Through cooperative agreements with local 
ind state agencies, the Elder Affairs Division offers a senior citizen lunch pro- 
gram, meals on wheels, health clinics, income tax assistance, classes, Friendly 
Visiting, homemaker and chore services, outreach and information and referral. 

In March of 1979, the Senior Center moved to newly renovated barrier-free 
quarters on the first floor of 11 Essex Street. Attendance at the Center has in- 
reased with the removal of architectural barriers and the move to the newly fur- 
bished pleasant surroundings. Weekly attendance at the Senior Center activities 
averages over 500 and is causing participants to feel the crunch of the lack of 
space in the new quarters. 

In cooperation with the Memorial Hall Library and the Eastern Massachusetts 
:: Regional Library System, a Monday film series has been introduced to the program. 
In addition, other activities include Line Dancing, Singing, Conversational French, 
Quilting, Needleart, Ceramics, Bridge, Bowling, Bingo, Lip Reading sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Guild for the Hard of Hearing, Doll House Construction with an instruc- 
tor provided by the Essex County Extension Service, Oriental Rug Design, Monthly 
Birthday parties, Travelogues and more. 

With the assistance from the National Council on Aging and the National 
Endowment for the Arts and Humanities, a senior citizens Humanities Program was 
introduced as part of the Center's program. With the assistance of the Andover 
historical Society and its Director, the first program in this series "Exploring 

39 



Local History" was a huge success. The Historical Society has also presented its 
slide programs of Andover as a part of the Senior Center program. Without the 
cooperation of local community groups, it would not be possible to offer the excel- 
lent program the Andover Senior Center has developed. 

Day trips designed for senior citizens are also part of the Council on Aging 
programs. Trips which the Council on \ging sponsored in 1979 included a Newport, 
Rhode Island, tour; Lake Winnipesaukee Cruise; trips to the Boston Ballet, the 
theater to see "Annie," "A Chorus Line," and other productions; the Ice Follies; 
Newburyport; Strawberry Banke; and other places of interest. Day trips continue to 
be a popular activity. The cost for these trips is paid entirely by the partici- 
pants and is reimbursed to the Town through the Council on Aging Special Programs 
Account . 

In December of 1979, the Town entered into contract with the Merrimack Valle? 
Regional Transit Authority to provide elderly and handicapped transportation. The 
COA recommended this method of providing for the transportation needs of Andover 's 
residents as the most cost effective. The COA station wagon went out of service in 
November, and new Federal Section 504 regulations would require replacing the 
vehicle with a lift-equipped handicapped vehicle at a great expense to the Town. 
Also with CETA cutbacks, the Town would have to assume the cost of drivers for the 
program. The COA felt the best solution was to contract with the MVRTA to provide 
transportation from 8:30 to 5:30, Monday through Friday. The cost to the Town for 
this service is twenty-five percent of the total operating cost with the remainder 
being paid by State and Federal funds. The cost to the individual for this service 
is 25<? one way within Andover and $1.00 one way out of Town in the Greater Lawrence 
area . 

The reorganization of the Elder Affairs Division was completed in 1979 when 
the position of Haven Director, Dorothy M. Winn, was upgraded to the position of 
Elder Affairs Coordinator. The staff on the Council on Aging, in addition to the 
Coordinator includes: Friendly Visitor Coordinator, Gwen C. Smith; Clerk, Sheila E. 
Foley; Meals on Wheels Drivers, Clayton Northey and Elaine Cutler. Also included 
are Senior Aides funded through Elder Services of Merrimack Valley: Jennie Faraci, 
Shirley Kennedy and Helen Snell. 



Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc. 



• 



Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc. is a non-profit human service organization 
designed to coordinate and create community-based resources for the provision of: 

a. Family, group and individual counseling and psychotherapy 

b. Educational, vocational counseling 

c. School and community consultations 

d. Outreach activities 

to individuals in the greater Lawrence area who are experiencing problems, particu- 
larly those to substance abuse, in living in home, school and society. 

Its work in Andover is principally with adolescents and serves as a resource to 
the schools and the community in dealing with problems of substance abuse, i.e 
drugs and alcohol. 

Much of the work is devoted to treatment and prevention; e.g., drug and alcohol 
education presentations in the schools and community and group work in the schools 
Eighty-five percent of the staff's time and effort can be seen in this area. 

In addition, time and effort has been spent on behalf of senior citizens who 
must often deal with loss, loneliness and physical pain and who often compensate fori 
this with overmedication or increased use of alcohol 

I 

40 






■e 



Finally, the staff is developing programs for women dealing with stress, sepa- 
ation and loss. They also often turn to prescribed tranquilizers, alcohol or other 
rugs as their only means of relief. 

Additionally, adults are being helped to deal better with problems of divorce 
nd parenting. 

Special programs offered this year to the Andover community were: 

Drug Awareness Presentation - Seven hour program presented to school 

administrators 

Workshop on Assertiveness Training for the Women's Organization at the 

Internal Revenue Service 

Assertiveness Training Course (8 sessions) offered to Andover women 

Participated and led discussion group in program on "Teens and Alcohol", 

sponsored by the Peer Counselors at Andover High 
School 

Drug Awareness Presentation at West Junior High for parents and community at 

large 

"Youth, Drugs, and Prevention" lecture given to Andover Parents Without Partners 

Group 



Self-Awareness Group (8 sessions) offered to Andover women 
pecial Programs Currently in Planning: 



"Therapeutic Strategies in the Treatment of Drug Users and Abusers" To be pre- 

sented to all sophomore Health Education classes 
at Andover High School 

"Drugs, Alcohol, and the Family" To be presented jointly by the Greater 

Lawrence Outreach, Inc. and the ASAP program at 
Lawrence General Hospital. Sponsored by the Task 
Force on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, and offered to 
adults and students of the community. 

Continuing community involvements of the Greater Lawrence Outreach continue in 
he Task Force on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, the Health Education Advisory Committee, 
nd a Youth Needs Study Group for Andover youth. 

Cynthia Frankel, psychologist, began consulting with various school personnel 
n September, 1979, and initiated long-term commitments to weekly therapy groups at 
est Elementary School and West Junior High. 

ummary of Services and Programs Provided to the Andover Community 



In addition to the time spent in direct service at the schools, considerable 
ime is devoted to planning each of the four groups, record keeping, and preparing 
ORE evaluations and educational plans. 

Phillis Yardley, Clinical Director at Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc , also 
erves the Andover community by providing weekly clinical supervision for three 
djustment Counselors. 

Finally, virtually every staff person at Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc. has 
'orked with clients from the Andover community. While in some instances these in- 

ividuals are self-referred, quite often they are referred by the Andover Police 
'epartment, as well as by school personnel, including guidance counselors and 
;chool psychologists. The range of services provided includes individual therapy, 
family therapy, drug counseling and education, psychological testing and evaluation, 

eferral to other agencies, and so on. 

41 






Animal Inspection 



The following is a statistical report of the activities 

of the Inspector of Animals for the calendar year 1979: 

No. of dogs quarantined and examined for signs of Rabies 38 

No. of dogs found to have Rabies 

No. of other animals examined for Rabies 2 

No. of animals found to have Rabies 

No. of barns inspected 50 

No. of horses 148 

No. of dairy cattle 95 

No. of beef cattle 6 

No. of swine 661 

No. of goats 19 

No. of sheep 14 



Community Development & Planning 



This past year has been an extremely demanding one for the relatively new Depart- 
ment. Development activity increased significantly with the amount of time for 
plan review and permit issuance and inspection increasing proportionately. Regret 
fully, the Department saw the departure of several dedicated and experienced em- 
ployees. Don Ward, Electrical Inspector, Walter Vogt , Plumbing and Gas Inspector, 
and Veda Connolly, Account Clerk all resigned or retired during the year. With th 
earlier loss of Hele., Richards and Arthur Peatman, the Department had an increased 
need to pull together to offset the loss of these very valuable and dedicated Town 
employees. The staff has been equal to the effort, however, and is very grateful 
the residents and other Town departments for their support and assistance. 

At the beginning of March, the Department moved from its offices in Town Hall to 
the second floor of the Theatre Building at 11 Essex Street. The move has had bot 
positive and negative impacts. From a positive standpoint, it has promoted the 
"departmentalization" of the staff and provided a tighter network for coordination 
From a negative standpoint, it has strained inter-departmental communications thro 
the loss of immediate contact with the Town Manager, Town Clerk, Assessors' Office 
and Collector/Treasurer's Office. This has necessarily resulted in some increased 
lagtime and some extra effort being expended to ensure consistency of efforts. 

Without question, the coordination at the plan approval level (boards and commis- 
sions) and the permit level (staff) has improved markedly. Consistency of represen 
tations between boards has led to consistency in actions of the boards. New devel 
ment review procedures utilizing revised critical path methods have resulted in 
significant improvements to the issuance of permits and the inspections related 
thereto. This new coordination, in addition to ensuring a better residential en- 
vironment in Andover, is particularly attractive to potential industrial developer 
The Department is in a position to "fastrack" all proposed industrial development 
and this has helped the Town to retain the qualities that make it an attractive 
location for the superior industrial development that wishes to locate in Andover 

Application and permit fees were increased this past year and, with the volume of 
development activity the Town is experiencing, Department revenues have increased 
significantly. The estimated budget expenditure for FY 1980 is approximately 
$318,500 with revenues projected to offset approximately $210,000, or 2/3 of that 
amount. It is the Board of Selectmen's position and the position of the boards am 
commissions associated with the Department that, to the maximum feasible extent, 
fees should offset the cost of operating the Department. The fees set by all the 
Boards strive for this goal. 

42 



-: 



This next year promises to be a demanding and exciting one for the Department. The 
completion of the Topographic and Wetlands Mapping Programs will be very influential 
in the upcoming planning programs - the results of the mapping programs to date have 
been extremely beneficial to both the staff and the various boards. These tools, 
in addition to the Sanitary Sewerage Facility Plan will be invaluable inputs to a 
new Comprehensive Plan for the Town (which proceeded at a somewhat slower pace than 
desired this past year). In short, with the pace and volume of new development 
expected to continue and with the firm control of the Town's volunteer boards and 
commissions proposed to improve, the Department can expect to be extremely busy 
in doing its part to ensure a safe, sanitary and functional environment for the 
residents of Andover. 

THE PLANNING BOARD: 



During 1979, the Planning Board held 22 meetings. The Planning Board considered a 
total of 13 subdivision plans which required action by the Board. Of the 13 plans 
considered, 12 were definitive plans and one was a preliminary plan. All of the 
plans were approved totaling 157 lots. The Board also approved two Special Permits 
for Cluster Development. Forty-seven subdivision plans not requiring action by 
the Board were so certified, totaling 140 lots. Seven improvement/performance 
bonds were established in the total amount of $267,912.00, releasing 102 lots for 
sale and development. 

The Planning Board reported on 40 Warrant Articles during 1979. Five of the articles 
were amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and all were adopted by Town Meeting. One of 
the amendments created a Design Advisory Group to review applications for building 
permits within the area zoned for General Business which includes the Shawsheen and 
Ballardvale areas, as well as the Central Business District. The members of the 
Design Advisory Group were appointed and the Group began their functions. Another 
amendment voted by the Town Meeting controls parking and access on the main streets 
of the Central Business District adjacent to Main Street. Another prominent amend- 
ment prohibits so-called "fast food" restaurants in all districts except on applica- 
tion to the Zoning Board of Appeals in the General Business and Industrial General 
zones . 

BOARD OF HEALTH: 



This past year saw the Board of Health involved in a myriad of issues and events. 
In February, the Board adopted a new series of Minimum Requirements for the Sub- 
surface Disposal of Sanitary Sewage. These new regulations have had a significant 



impact on the design requirements and performance controls for new residential de- 
velopment. As experience dictates, the Board intends to amend and modify the regu- 
lations on a continuing basis. In addition, the Board has been working in the de- 
velopment of a set of Well Water Regulations that should enable the Town to better 
ensure the integrity of wells used for potable water purposes. These Regulations 
should be adopted by spring of 1980. 

The Board reviewed and approved ten (10) subdivision plans pursuant to the provis- 
ions of M.G.L. Chapter 41. The Board's new regulations have had a positive effect 
on the quality of plans submitted for review -- both at the subdivision level as 
well as the individual lot approval level. With respect to t he latter, the Board 
reviewed and approved 172 septic system plans and denied two (2) plans which would 
have required variances to the regulations. 

With respect to the Public Health arena, the Board authorized the dispensing of 
Pneumococcal Vaccine to all Andover residents with chronic disease via the Public 
Health Nurse's Flu Clinics. This past summer, a rather serious Salmonella outbreak 
occurred at Phillips Academy which resulted in forty-three (43) positive cases. The 
Board provided the necessary leadership and liaison to Phillips and the State — 
both of whom were very helpful and professional in their handling of the matter. 

Lastly, the Board was compelled to close Pomps Pond to swimming and other contact by 
the public. This action was necessary due to the presence of a very toxic form of 
algae and the lack of visibility in the water. It is hoped that some form of re- 
medial action can be taken by the Town this next spring and that a long-term 

43 



solution to the problem of Pomps Pond can be found and funded. 

Public Health Nursing 

Clinics : 

Influenza : Free influenza vaccine (A/Brazil, A/Texas, B/Hong Kong) was offered to 
Andover residents over sixty and to residents any age with chronic disease. Police 
fire and teachers were included as essential personnel. Three hundred and fifteen 
(315) people were immunized Nov. 28th at the clinic held at the Doherty School. On 
December 14, a make-up clinic was held at the Haven and thirty-three (33) attended 
and were immunized. Vaccine was distributed to private physicians and two Andover 
nursing homes. The Public Health Nurse immunized shut-ins with a written order froi 
their private physician. Several Andover residents were immunized in the nurses 
office as they missed the clinic. 

Four hundred and sixty-eight (468) flu shots were administered during the flu pro- ; 
gram this year. There has been considerable B/Hong Kong flu in Andover, but most 
of the elders have escaped due to the flu immunization program. 

Pneumovax : Pneumococcal Vaccine was offered to all Andover residents with chronic 
disease at the flu clinics this year and was given individually or as a second 
shot if they received flu vaccine. There was a charge of three dollars for the 
vaccine. Thirty-six (36) Andover residents received the vaccine and the town ex- 
pense was twenty-seven (27) dollars. This vaccine offers protection against pneu- 
mococcal pneumonia for three years. 

Blood Pressure Clinic : May, 1979 was High Blood Pressure Month and the Andover 
Board of Health sponsored two clinics, May 18 and May 25th, at the Andover Savings 
Bank and Arlington Trust Bank in Shawsheen. One hundred and sixty-three (163) 
people were screened and eleven (11) were found to be unknown hypertensives. Folio 1 
up on the hypertensives was completed by the Public Health Nurse. 

Diabetes Screening Clinic: A Diabetic Screening Clinic for Andover residents over 
sixty (60) was sponsored by the Health Department in May 1979, and was held at the 
Haven. Twenty-eight (20) persons were screened and five (5) were referred to their J 
private doctors due to an elevated blood sugar. The public health nurse provided 
follow-up and two unknown diabetics were discovered and treated as a result of this ] 
clinic. It is hoped when this screening is offered again, more people will take th*] 
time to have this simple blood test. 

Amblyopia Clinics (Lazy Eye Blindness) : Andover children received free Amblyopia 
screening through the Andona Society-Amblyopia Screening Program. Several screen- 
ings were held, including p re-school and kinder garden . One hundred forty (140) 
boys and one hundred and forty-three (143) girls were screened. Fifteen (15) 
referrals were made for further testing. The age range of. the children was 3-5 yea:] 



Blood Lead Screening Clinics : Free blood lead testing is done twice monthly at 
clinics held in the Public Health Nurse's Office-Clinic. Fifteen 15) pre-school 
children attended these clinics during the past year with no elevated blood lead 
levels. The Andover School Department recommended blood lead testing to parents 
for children attending the annual pre-school screening. There were thirty-four (34 
children screened by an outreach worker from the Greater Lawrence Community Action 
Council Lead Poisoning Prevention Program and seven children were screened by the 
public health nurse at the clinics. No blood lead elevations were found. 

Elderly Health Program 

Outreach Mini Clinics 

These clinics promote health, maintain optimum health and prevent disease by screen- 
ing tests, monitoring vital signs, counselling and referring patients as needed. 
Four (4) clinics are held monthly: 1st week, Haven; 2nd week, Chestnut Court and 
Grandview Terrace; 3rd week, Ballardvale United Church; 4th week, Frye Circle. Sev> 



44 






lundred eighty-four (784) Andover residents over sixty attended these clinics in 
979 and forty-nine (49) were referred to community agencies or private physicians 

[aven Hour 



:ight hundred twenty-nine (829) Andover residents over sixty (60) attended the drop- 
n clinic Wednesday afternoon at the Haven. Vital signs were monitored and counsel- 
ing and referral offered each patient as needed. 

[ome Visits 



'orty-five (45) home visits were made by the Public Health Nurse to Andover senior 
esidents. Fifty-five home visits were made by the Nurse Practitioner from the 
ireater Lawrence Elderly Health Program to Andover residents over sixty (60) years 
>f age. 



)ffice Visits 



Seventeen (I?"* office visits were made by Andover elders and they received services 
rom the public health nurse. 

lommunicable Disease Control 



el 



Salmonella outbreak at Phillips Academy during the summer school session caused 
orty-three (43) cases of reported ralmonella. The public health nurse provided the 
ollow-up for each reported case. 

lantoux Skin Testing is provided by appointment to all Andover residents. Eighty 
80) people were tested in 1979 and all positive tests were followed-up by the 
\ublic health nurse. 

itate regulations regarding Tuberculosis control and other communicable diseases are 
mplemented through the Public Health Nurse and other members of the Health Division, 
'he public health nurse arranged services to and works directly with the Greater 
.awrence Tuberculosis clinic. Biologies and culture kits are obtained from the 
tate and dispensed free by the public health nurse to private physicians, schools, 
nd industrial health centers. 



Environmental Health 

'his past year has been an extremely busy one for the Health Division. The largest 
ortion of the staff's time was spent on reviewing and inspecting new developments, 
ew regulations governing the installation and design of subsurface sewage disposal 
ystems were promulgated to ensure a safe environment for home owners in Andover. 

ncreased attention was given to our Food Service Sanitation Program, with an in- 
reased number of re-inspections of restaurants. In addition, a new and stricter 
omprehensive inspection procedure based on the U. S. Food and Drug Administration 
as adopted. Food handlers training courses were again offered free to all food 
ervice establishment employees. 

'ollution control also required more staff time this year than in previous years, 
tudies are being conducted on Pomps Pond to determine the causes of the algae 
looms which resulted in the closing of the beaches to bathers. At least five cases 
f industrial pollution required immediate and extensive staff time. A significant 
mount of noise and land pollution complaints were also investigated. 

ear 1980 will bring new challenges to the Health Division. Hazardous waste control 
romises to be an area that will receive increased attention by the Division as well 
s the appropriate State agencies. New subdivisions and industrial sites will be 
losely scrutinized for any possible future public health hazards. In general, a 
ommitment to bring more effective and comprehensive environmental health care to 
he Town residents has been made. 



45 






Statistical summary : 

Sewage Disposal: Percolation Tests 774 

Soil Analysis (water tables) 1311 

Septic System Plan Review 172 

Subdivision Plan Review 10 

Consultations 250 

Final System Installations 123 

Sewer Connection Plan Reviews 31 

Septic System Repairs 54 

Food Investigation Activity: 

Food Facilities individual 

Inspections) 143 

Food Sanitation Course 

Certificates Granted 24 

Food Facility Plan Reviews 16 

Vending Machine Inspections 71 
Food Facility Sanitation 

Consultations 69 

General: Housing Investigations 19 

Court Appearances (Housing) 2 
Stables Inspected (complaint only) 6 

Swimming Pools Inspected 18 
General Complaints 113 

Dump Sites (General) 15 

Industrial Waste Accidents 9 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS : 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapters 40A and 40B, and the Town 
Bylaws. The Board meets on the first Thursday of every month in the second floor 
hall of Memorial Hall Library. Five regular members and two associate members are 
appointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings held by the 
Board of Appeals are the result of applications in the following areas: 



1. For a variance from the requirements of Bylaws 

2. For a special permit under the Bylaws 

3. By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector or other 
administrative officer 

4. For permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Tow 
of Andover (Comprehensive Permit) 



■ 



Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches re- 
quested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified, as requirec 
by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the 
Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearing, the members of the j 
Board view each property in question. Based on their view and the evidence pre- 
sented at the hearing, a decision is rendered, signed and filed in the Town Clerk's 
office. Parties in interest are notified of the Board's decision. 

In the period from January 1, 1979, through December 31, 1979, the Board of Appeals 
held 12 regular meetings and considered 62 petitions. The Board approved thirty- 
seven r 37) Variances and nine (9) Special Permits. The Board denied seven (7) 
Variances. Seven (7) petitions were withdrawn. In addition, the Board granted 
one (1) Comprehensive Permit and reversed one (1) decision of the Inspector of 
Buildings upon appeal. 

Three petitions heard during the year attracted considerable attention. The L. 
John Davidson decision permitted the use of the Andover Institute of Business builc 
ing for commercial and retail purposes by granting a variance to the off-street 
parking requirements of the Zoning Bylaw. The P. Leo Corcoran and John M. Cocoran 



46 



;p-General Partners of Andover Commons Associates decision was the first comprehen- 



sive Permit petition ever submitted to the Board. The Board granted the Permit 
vhich, with certain restrictions, will permit the conversion and rehabilitation of 
Tyer Industries, Inc. property on Railroad Street for low and moderate income and 
?lderly housing. The Friends of Shawsheen Village Association decision reversed the 
lecisionof the Inspector of Buildings to issue a building permit to George Chongris 
ind/or James Chongris for the construction of a proposed Donut Shop at 349 North 
lain Street. 

;ONSERVATION COMMISSION: 



..and Acquisition 



''or the first time in a dozen years, no new parcels of land were acquired for con- 
ervation purposes during 1979. However, negotiation is actively proceeding for 
mrchase of land in the watershed of Fish Brook and Haggetts Pond, notably Forest 
lills wetlands. Water supply protection is receiving first priority in the use of 
onservation funds for land acquisition. 

Jelf-help funds were awarded to the Town in the amount of $19,500 as reimbursement 
or 50% of the purchase price of the Booth property (Skug River wetlands, off Salem 
Street), the Christy property (off Boston Road) and the Cutler and Lord properties 
along the Shawsheen River off Red Spring Road). At year's end, funding for the 
Said Hill-Wood Hill area (High Plain Realty Trust) and wetlands near intersection of 
[igh P ain and Greenwood Roads (Curtis Development) was still pending. 

me important parcel of land abutting the Harold Parker Forest, the 83-acre Mortimer- 
•ettigrew property along the Skug River between Harold Parker Road and Jenkins Road, 
as acquired in 1979 by the Commonwealth as an addition to the State Forest. The 
onservation Commission was instrumental in persuading the State to buy the property 
hich includes the sites of a former large sawmill, a soapstone quarry active in the 
arly 19th century, and the eastern shore of Bear Pond. 

etlands Protection Act 



M 



il: 



dministrat ion of the Wetlands Protection Act occupies most of the time and atten- 
ion of the Conservation Commission, which constantly seeks to improve its sur- 
eillance of wetlands activity for the purpose of preventing future problems for the 
own and for prospective homeowners and preserving vital wetlands functions. Ac- 
ivities subject to the provisions of the Wetlands Protection Act come to the atten- 
ion of the Commission in several ways: (1) review of proposed residential subdivision 
lans, commercial and industrial development plans and subsurface sewage disposal 
lans ; (2) requests for determination of applicability ; (3) direct observation in the 
ield. 

orty-five (45) Notices of Intent for projects subject to the Wetlands Protection 
ct were processed by the Conservation Commission and its staff during 1979. Of the 
rders of Conditions issued, three were appealed to the State Department of Environ- 
ental Quality Engineering. Sixty '60) projects subject to the Wetlands Protection 
ct have current files with the Conservation Commission. 

etlands Mapping 



f the 183 topographic maps on a scale of 1"-100', covering the Town of Andover as 
repared from aerial photographs, all but twenty-six (26) have been mapped for sta- 
utory wetlands. Prints of these maps are available at the Office of the Department 
f Community Development and Planning. 

hese maps are proving to be an extremely valuable aid both to the Town and to develop- 
rs in the planning and evaluation of prospective developments. 

he wetlands mapping team of Terrain Investigation Inc., now thoroughly familiar with 
ndover, has been employed to review several difficult sites and advise the Commis - 
ion concerning their development. 

47 



Management and Utilization 

Land in the custody of the Conservation Commission totals over 500 acres, in more 

than fifty separate parcels, most of them identified by signs on trees at points o 

access. The public is invited to use these areas for passive recreation, subject 
to the rules adopted by the Commission. 

Three areas of open land are currently in use for the production of hay and corn. 

Community vegetable gardening continues on the Merrimack River reservation, the 
former Shlakis property off Brundrett Avenue. Plots are available for the coming 
season . 

A contract between Esty & Sons Lumber Company and the Town of Andover for the re- 
moval of 50,000 board feet of lumber from Carmel Woods, off High Street, has been 
signed. Lumbering will be under the supervision of the Conservation Commission 
and the County Forester. 

The Conservation Commission is participating in efforts to improve the quality of 
water in Pomps Pond, the Town's swimming facility. 

BUILDING INSPECTION: 



The purpose and scope of the Massachusetts State Building Code is to provide for tl 
health, safety and public welfare through structural strength and stability, ade- 
quate egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property 
from fire and other hazards during and following construction. 

The Building Inspection Division of the Department of Community Development and 
Planning is charged with the enforcement of the Massachusetts State Building Code, 
local Zoning Bylaw, and other specialized related codes, with its rulings subject 
to appeal to the Zoning Board of Appeals, the Massachusetts State Building Code 
Commission, and other associated appeals boards. 

Applications for zoning variances and Special Permits are received and processed 
through this office so that petitioners can receive the guidance needed to prevent 
any potential legal ramifications that could result by misrepresenting or under- 
standing their particular case. This requires much time as records must be kept 
for office and public review. 

At the request of the Board of Selectmen, and as required by law, establishments 
seeking various licenses were investigated for compliance to the life safety codes 
and inspection reports were filed with the Town Manager. Also, as required by the 
Massachusetts State Building Code, many other establishments requiring licenses 
were investigated and Certificates of Inspection were issued as required and 
defined in Table 1.1 of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

The Inspector of Buildings, Local Building Inspector and the Assistant Local Build- 
ing Inspector attended many courses in advanced education sponsored by both the 
Commonwealth and the Massachusetts Building Inspector's Association. Attendance 
at these courses is mandatory in order to maintain current certifications, enables 
the inspectors to better interpret the newly-enacted amendments and requirements 
of the various codes. It also provides an opportunity to review new and approved 
types of materials for all types of construction and maintain the current state- 
of-the-art . 

Numerous building and zoning violations were investigated and corrected without in- 
cident; however, some violators were prosecuted creating additional workload and 
responsibilities for the inspectors. 

Considerable time was spent during the past year in prepration for the many changes 
in design criteria and the increased workload by this office relative to schools, 
special halls, nursing homes, and much more, which were formally under the juris- 
diction of the Regional State Inspector. This new workload mandated by Chapter 802 

created many demands upon this Division for additional reports - many of which adde 

48 



man-hours of inspections of new uses in addition to the work that was previously 
under local jurisdiction, and under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 143. Newly- 
enacted articles of the Massachusetts State Building Code now require that all new 
buildings, alterations and additions satisfy all requirements pertaining to energy 
conservation. Additional time has been spent by this office due to these new re- 
quirements in plan review and in the field with added inspections. 

By vote of the Board of Selectmen, new fees for Building Permits were approved 
and became effective April 24, 1979. This increased revenue, along with fees 
mandated by the Massachusetts State Building Code in accordance with Table 1.1, 
have placed this Division on a self-supporting basis. Following is a tabulation 
of the Building Permits issued for the years 1975 through 1979. 



7/74 - 12/75 



EST. VALUE 



FEES 



168 

97 

478 

194 

937 

45 

1 

1976 



Dwellings and Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign, swimming 
pools , etc . ) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 6,041,500 
9,282,296 
2,707,277 

309,630 
$18,340,703 



$ 54,143.00 

1,42 5.00 

3.0 

55,571.00 



183 

56 

360 

130 

729 

97 

1 

1977 
199 
52 
496 
122 

869 

70 

1 

1978 
161 
47 
460 
164 

832~ 
61 
1 



1979 

121 

16 

554 

293 



Dwellings and Garages 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign swimming 
pools , etc . ) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 6,704,000 
1,237,253 
1.359,664 

189,077 
$ 9,489,994 



Dwellings & Garages $ 8,655.800 

Other Buildings 619,751 

Additions & Alterations 5,713.996 

Other (raze, sign, swimming pools, 
etc.) 201, 117 

$ 19,190,664 



Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



Dwellings & Garges 
Other Buildings 
Additions & Alterations 
Other (raze, sign swimming 
pools, etc) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 7,259,000 
8,062,394 
3,787,839 

212,769 
$19,322,002 



Dwellings & Garages 

Other Buildings 

Additions & Alterations 

Other (raze, sign swimming pools > 
etc 1 . 



Certificates of Inspection 
>oil Removal 



$ 4,421,000 

10,899,233 

7,967,647 

525.381 
$23,813,261 



$ 27,536.07 

6,C51.00 

15.00 

$ 33,602.07 



$ 44,410.00 

2,401.00 

150.00 

$ 46,961.00 



$ 91,091.00 

1,956.25 

15.00 

$ 93,062.25 



$112, 153.00 
42,626.25 

$154,779.25 



49 



ELECTRICAL INSPECTION : 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding oJ| 
persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. 



Enforcement of t 
of the Electrica 
of Community Dev 
ing fire alarm r 
ing inspections 
trial jobs; condu 
care centers, an 
plans for new bu 
assisting the Fi 
or equipment and 
attending school 
tion systems to 



he Massachusett 
1 Inspector in 
elopment and PI 
egulations for 
on a daily basi 
cting and certi 
d nursing homes 
ildings; inspec 
re Department 
seeing that pe 
and classes on 
keep up with st 



s Electri 
the Build 
anning 
new homes 
s ; inspec 
fying ins 
, former 1 
ting all 
in inspec 
rmits are 
revision 
andards 



cal Code 
ing Inspe 
The Inspe 
; receivi 
ting all 
pec tion o 
y covered 
buildings 
tion of f 
issued f 
s to the 



is the respons 
ction Division 
ctor also is r 
ng and granting 
residential, c 
f schools, pub 

by the State; 

for certifica 
ires due to fa 
or repairs due 
electrical cod 



ibility of 

of the De 
esponsible 

permits a 
ommercial 
lie buildi 

approving 
te of occu 
ulty elect 

to fire d 
e and powe 



the Off 
partment 

for enf 
nd sched 
and indus 
ngs , day 

electric 
pancy ; 
rical dev 
amage ; ari 
r distriH 



t p 
liec 

r 

tor 
lor 

[ol 

in 



Because the number of inspections per permit has increased, particularly in the ir 
dustrial and commercial areas, the Division has completely revised and increased t 
permit fees dealing with those areas. It is the intent of the Electrical Inspecto 
to assure the citizens and businesses of Andover safe electrical installation and 
operation. 



1976 

178 
200 
3 
274 
655 

1977 

181 

190 

301 
672 

1978 
160 
164 
2 
313 
639 

1979 

134 

726 

133 

280 

726 



TYPE 

New Dwellings 
Alteration & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (services , boiler , etc.) 



New Dwellings 
Alteration & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others services, boiler, etc.) 



New Dwellings 
Alteration & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (services, boiler, etc 



New Dwellings 
Alteration & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boiler, etc 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION : 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and 
State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code formulated 
Plumbers and Gas Fitters under authority of Cha 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The Office of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector in 
the Department of Community Development and ^la 
authorized by Chapter 142 of the General Laws t 
as adopted and amended by the Board of State Ex 



50 



FEES COLLECTED 

$ 2,852.00 

2,510.75 

90.00 

2,965.00 

$ 8,417.00 



$ 3,305.00 
2,073.75 

3,086.50 
$ 8,465.25 



$ 4,411.00 

4,602.35 

735.50 

3,601.00 

$13,349.85 



$ 6,305.00 

2,261.00 

10,073.00 

5,572.50 

$24,211.50 



gas installation is controlled by a 
by the Board of State Examiners of 
pter 142 of the General Laws of the 



the Building Inspection Division o 
nning is the Administrative Authori 
o enforce the provisions of the cod* 
aminers . 









The Codes are founded upon certain principles of sanitation and safety through 
properly designed, acceptably installed, and adequately maintained systems to pro- 
tect the health and safety of people everywhere. 

In addition to inspection, all applications must be reviewed and issued before any 
iwork can be started. Complaints and violations must also be investigated and corrected 
or reported to the proper authorities. 

[Following is a tabulation of all permits issued for the years 1975 through 1979 and 
fees collected. 

SEWER INSPECTIONS 

Permits and inspections controlling house (building) sewers have been issued since 
June, 1975. 



CALENDAR YEA R 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 



NUMBER OF 
PERMITS 



FEES 



CALENDAR YEAR 



1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 



CALENDAR YEAR 



37 


$ 370 




60 


600 




67 


670 




34 


1525 




GAS INSPECTIONS 






NEW BUILDINGS OTHER 


TOTAL PERMITS 


FEES 


101 58 


159 


$1,049 


127 55 


182 


1,359 


87 69 


156 


1,048 


132 49 


181 


1,176 


48 252 


300 


3,000 


PLUMBING INSPECTIONS 







1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 

INSPECTION SERVICES 



NEW BUILDING S 

128 
204 
209 
215 
121 



REPAIRS & 
REMODELING 

79 

93 
105 
113 
205 



TOTAL PERMITS 

207 
297 
314 
328 
326 



FEES 

3,064 
4,136 
4,385 
5,354 
6,394 



The purpose of the Division of Inspection Services is to assure the compliance of 
private contractors and developers with the Planning Board's Rules and Regulations, 
specifications of the Department of Public Works and all other Town regulations. 

Under the direction of the Director of Community Development and Planning, the Con- 
struction Inspector enforces the rules and regulations of the Town. The scope of the 
inspections includes the construction of roads within subdivisions and all utilities 
such as sanitary sewers, water mains, storm drainage, gas. electric and telephone. 
A full testing program of utilities is conducted to insure that specifications have 
been met during construction. All sanitary sewers and sewer manholes are tested 
for infiltration before being placed in service. Water mains are subject to pres- 
sure, leakage and bacteria tests; and unless all tests are satisfactory, no water 
nain may be placed in service. Daily inspections are carried out on all active sub- 
divisions with mandatory inspections at various stages of construction. 

At present, there are approximately forty subdivisions with over ten miles of roads 
being constructed in the Town. The levels of construction range from plans on paper 
only to completed subdivisions with streets submitted for acceptance by the Town. 
Dver 700 inspections were made on these subdivisions in the past year. This includes 
the testing of sanitary sewers and water mains. Water samples are also drawn for 
bacteria testing. In 1977, fees for bacteria testing were instituted and are as 

51 



follows: $25.00 for the first test and $30.00 for all subsequent testing on the 
same water main. Thirty water samples were taken in 1979 and $420.00 was turned in 
to the Town Treasurer. 

Actine as an agent for the Conservation Commission, the General Construction Insped 
reviews plans and inspects the subdivisions for conformity with the approved plans 
of the Conservation Commission. In addition, the General Construction Inspector 
inspects street openings and maintains a cross-section file on all street openings 
and contractors. A file on insurance coverage of all road contractors working with- 
in the Town is maintained. 



Weights & Measures 



Today's high cost of living and rising energy costs have made everyone aware of the 
value of the goods purchased. 

It is a mandate, backed up by State and local laws, to make sure that the public 
gets a full measure. 

This past year the Department accomplished several inspections and retests of 
the gasoline pumps in this locality. This practice will continue. If a resident 
has a complaint, whether it be gasoline or the weight of meat purchased, please 
notify the Sealer in writing. 

Below is a partial list of measuring devices sealed and inspected by this Departme 

5 scales of 100-5000 lb. capacity 
38 scales under 100 lb capacity 
72 gasoline pumps 
27 Oil trucks inspected 

5 truck-loads of cord wood 

3 truck-loads of bark mulch 



Public Works 



General 

The following is a list of major projects that were underway during 1979. The 
list consists of 29 projects totaling $3,863,670. 

The Town staff provided field surveys; engineering design; specifications 
and contract documents for public bidding and supervision on 20 of these projects. 



Projects 



Water Mains - Dascomb Road, Osgood Street, Clark $1,250,000 

Road, Andover Street, Woburn Street 

Water Mains - Kenilworth, Riverina, and Williams 210,000 

Street 

Water Mains - Balmoral, Arundel, Argyle, York, 510,000 

Burnham Road 

Fish Brook Pumping Station Improvements 300,000 

Lowell Street Sewer 150,000 

Lucerne Drive Sewer 270,000 

52 



:■: 



Water Main - Tewksbury Street 2,500 

Andover Street - Sleeve under Railroad 5,250 

River Road Reconstruction 425,000 

Outfall Sewer Repairs 85,720 

Replace Front Walk - Treatment Plant 9,200 

Replace Roof & Water Shop & Tree Division 12,400 

Recreation Park Roadway 13,600 

Sidewalk Reconstruction (Concrete) 10,700 

Sidewalk Reconstruction (Bit. Concrete) 15,300 

Guard Rails (New) 11,400 

Fence Repairs & Playstead 800 

Intersection Improvements Harold Parker Road & 

Jenkins Road 3,800 

New Playing Fields & Landfill 21,500 

New Storm Drainage Improvements 78,400 

Miscellaneous Storm Drainage Improvements 10,900 

Storm Drainage Improvement & Town Yard & Binney 
Street (By Town Forces) 

Railroad Platform Construction 31,000 

Storm Drainage from St. Augustine's Drive to 

Shawsheen River 225,000 

Restore Girls Field Hockey Field - High School 
(By Town Forces) 

Redesign & Rebuild Vent for Holt Hill Reservoir 5,000 

Road Sealing - 45 Streets 

(83,210 gals, asphalt) 80,000 

Road Resurfacing (Bit. Concrete) Essex Street, Cuba 
Street, Elm Street to Washington Avenue 

(5,216 ft., 1,700 tons) 36,200 

Riverina Road Pumping Station (Step I) 90,000 

Total $3,863,670 

TGINEERING 



Field surveys, construction plans and documents, competitive bidding, field 
lyouts and on-site inspections were provided for the following list of projects: 

1. Improvements to the roadway and parking area at Recreation Park. 

2. Bituminous concrete and cement concrete sidewalk reconstruction. 

53 



3. A new tar and gravel roof for the Water and Tree Departments on Lewis 
Street . 

4. 2,680 feet of new surface water drainage lines of various sizes in the 
following streets; Holt Road, Wildwood Road, Embassy Lane, Sunset Rock 
Road, Homestead Circle, Ivy Lane, Lupine Road and Abbot Street. 

5. Ledge removal at corner of Jenkins Road and Harold Parker Road, for sigh 
distance improvement. 

6. 1,200 feet of new steel beam highway guard rail in various locations. 

7. Railroad platforms for the commuter rail in Ballardvale Center and near 
Essex Street in Andover Center. 

8. A 36" concrete pipe sleeve was placed under the railroad in Ballardvale 
for a future water main at the time the crossing was improved. 

A considerable amount of time was spent working with the consultants on the 
River Road Reconstruction in the Industrial Area, the Lucerne Drive sewer replace- 
ment, School Street area drainage, 24 inch water transmission main and the Town- 
wide sewer study. 



IP 1 
re; 






For the Planning Board preliminary and definitive plans for 12 subdivisions 
of land with a total of 157 lots were reviewed to determine conformance with its 
rules and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. 
Particular problems in the subdivisions under construction were reviewed with the 
Construction Inspector. Legal descriptions for easements and roadway layouts were 
checked before they were filed in the Registry of Deeds. 

Miscellaneous 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where necessary for the 
projects outlined above and for proposed projects. 

Field work was provided for the repairs to the outfall sewer trunk, the rough 

grading of the former sanitary land fill for playing fields, alterations to Rogers 

Brook near Main Street and the preliminary work for a wheelchair ramp at the Memo- 
rial Hall Library. 

The Town was represented in engineering matters with the Federal, State and 
County governments, principally concerning Elm Street reconstruction, TOPICS on 
Main Street, and Chapter 90 work. 

Many Town citizens and others were assisted in obtaining information about ex 
isting utilities, street layouts, industrial sites and other general information. 

The engineering records of the Town were maintained and updated and other Tow 
departments were aided in obtaining this information. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of underground utili- 
ties were issued through this division. 

The Engineering Division of Public Works consists of three full-time employee 
with one civil engineering student employed on a part-time basis. 



54 



... 
If 



ATER 

The Water Division of the Department of Public Works consists of 18 full-time 
mployees including the Superintendent. The division is responsible for the supply, 
reatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The major compo- 
ents of the water system are as follows: 

Supply: Haggetts Pond 
Fish Brook 
Merrimack River 
Abbott Well 

Treatment: Water Filtration Plant 

Chlorination Facilities - Fish Brook 

Pumping Stations: 

Water Filtration Plant 
Fish Brook 
Bancroft Road 
Abbott Well 

Distribution System: 

Storage Reservoirs: 
Bancroft Road 
Prospect Hill 
Wood Hill 

Distribution Water Mains; 
167 Miles 

Since the dedication in October 1974, of the Water Filtration Plant at Haggetts 
ond, the staff has conducted numerous tours for students in all grades of the 
ndover school system, colleges throughout New England, various local clubs, and 
isitors from all over the world. 

The total water pumped to the system from January 1, 1979 thru December 31, 
979, was 1,521,945,000 gallons. During the same period a total of 966,879,000 
allons of water was diverted from other sources. The average daily pumping was 
,169,712 gallons with a maximum day of 8,668,000 gallons occurring on July 14, 1979. 



-; 



Repairs 



lydrants 



f ater Meters 



House service leaks repaired - 22 
Water mains breaks repaired - 7 



Hydrants repaired or replaced - 15 
New hydrants installed - 14 



New meters installed - 110 

Old meters replaced - 90 
Water meters repaired and 

tested , - 30 

Field meters serviced - 14 
(spring and fall) 



55 



Additions to the water system by acceptance of streets: 

Algonquin Ave 3360 feet of 8" C. L.D.I. Pipe 

Bateson Drive 2150 feet of 8" C. L.D.I. Pipe 

Cherokee Circle 360 feet of 6" C. L.D.I. Pipe 

Comanche Place 860 feet of 6" C. L.D.I. Pipe 

Larchmont Circle 1190 feet of 8" C. L.D.I. Pipe 
Seminole Circle 510 feet of 6" C. L.D.I. Pipe 

icai 
In April 1979, bids for the installation of approximately 2190 linear feet of §all; 
12", 4310 linear feet of 8" and 240 linear feet of 6" ductile iron pipe on Balmora 
Street, York Street, Burnham Road, Arundel Street and Argyle Street were opened am 
the contract awarded to Grandview Contracting Inc., of Hyde Park, Mass., with com- 
pletion scheduled for April 1980. Also, in August 1979, bids for the installation f^i 
of approximately 5675 linear feet of 24", 9680 linear feet of 20", and 600 feet of 
various size pipe from 6" to 12" ductile iron pipe with completion of this work 
scheduled for early Fall of 1980. tot 

Ian 
For the twelve months of 1979, the division received $208.00 for special ser- kfi 
vices. Also, 22,009,120 gallons of water was sold to the Town of North Reading foil & 
the sum of $29,224.83, and 3,976,580 gallons of water was sold to the Town of Tewks 
bury for the sum of $5,408.15. 

Ii?ti 

SEWERS 



The Sewer Division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for the 
operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale Street in 
Ballardvale, Bridle Path Road, West Elementary School, Riverina Road in Shawsheen 
and the entire system of sanitary sev/ers . 

The sewerage system includes 62 miles of sanitary sewers and 3590 connections 
The Riverina Road pumping station discharges by means of a force main through the 
City of Lawrence to the Merrimack River. The raw sewage discharge from Riverina 
Road is collected and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's Regional 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

In the past year, the sewer division freed 17 blockages in sewer mains and 55 
private sewer services. Approximately 140 calls for assistance from homeowners 
with private sewer service problems were answered. 

The sewer maintenance program continues to show increasingly good results, 
with weekly and monthly inspections of certain sections of sewers that because of 
relatively flat slopes and low velocity cause plugging problems. 

Additions to the sewer system by the acceptance of streets: 

Bateson Drive 
Algonquin Ave 
Cherokee Circle 
Comanche Place 
Iroquois Ave 
Seminole Circle 



1875 


feet 


of 


8' 


' v.c. 


Pipe 


3360 


feet 


of 


8' 


' v.c. 


Pipe 


360 


feet 


of 


8' 


' v.c. 


Pipe 


540 


feet 


of 


8' 


' v.c. 


Pipe 


435 


feet 


of 


8' 


' v.c. 


Pipe 


500 


feet 


of 


8' 


' v.c. 


Pipe 



In June 1979, bids for the installation of approximately 1825 linear feet of 
12" and 200 linear feet of 6" ductile iron pipe for the Lowell Street sewer were 
opened and awarded to T. D. Sullivan & Sons, of Newton Center, Mass., with comple- 
tion in the Summer of 1980. 

During the twelve months of 1979, the division received $296.00 for special 
services . 



56 






IGHWAYS 



rcadia Road 

iallardvale Road 

Jannister Road 
beacon Street 

ilood Road 

foston Road 

irookfield Road 

frown Street 

lurton Farm Drive 

)handler Road 

Infield Street 
l:ssex Pit Entrance 

'orbes Lane 

'ox Hill Road 

[igh Plain Road (Rte 495 & 63) 



The following streets were sealed with asphalt and sand: 



High Street 

Holmes Road 

Holt Road 

Hunter Drive 

Karlton Circle 

Linda Road 

Marilyn Street 

Marrwood Street 

Nancy Circle 

Oak Street 

Orchard Street 

Old County Road 

Parking Lot (Park Street) 

Pinecrest Road 

Phillips Street 



Pleasant Street 

Princeton Avenue 

Robandy Road 

Rec Park Road (2 layers) 

Rattlesnake Road 

Rocky Hill Road 

Spring Grove Road 

Suncrest Road 

Shaw Drive 

Sunset Rock Road 

Tewksbury Street 

Webster Street 

Woburn Street 

Westwind Road 

Woodland Road 



Essex Street, Elm Street (Elm Square to Washington Ave.) and Cuba Street were 
resurfaced with an overlay of bituminous concrete. 

Clean Up 



During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy in continuous clean- 
ing of all streets after the winter sanding. One sweeper starts each morning at 
5:00 A.M. prior to the awakening of the business community. 

Leaf Pickup 

This was discontinued as a service to the community. 

Inspection 



The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division on its inspection of the 
conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed. 



Sidewalks 



Sidewalks were resurfaced with bituminous concrete on sections of Harding 
Street, Central Street, School Street and Stevens Street. A retaining wall was re- 
built on Harding Street. 



Storm Drains 



Storm drains, brooks and catch basins were cleaned and kept free of all debris 
borne 84 basins were repaired, deteriorization and damage mostly caused by frost and 
icy conditions during the winter season. 

Snow Removal and Ice Control 



th» o T t!? Hi f hW f y ° ivision With the help and cooperation of all other divisions of 
the Public Works Department is also responsible for snow removal and ice control 
including flood control for all town roads 



57 



The snowfall was as follows: 

November 1978 - 3 inches 

December 1978 - 10 inches 

January 1979 - 16 inches 

February 1979 - __6 inches 

Total 35 inches 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 



This division of Public Works Department is vested with the responsibility c 
providing complete maintenance for all Public Works Department vehicles. 

This division maintains a supply of fuel oil (diesel fuel and gasoline) incl 
ing lubricants for the above-mentioned divisions in addition to providing gasolin 
for the School Department, Library vehicles, Haven vehicles, Recreation vehicles 
and some Police vehicles. 

As prescribed by statutory law, all vehicles must be inspected bi-annually a 
necessary repairs are accomplished in order to maintain state standards for safet 

An Inspection Station, approved and license granted by the Registry of Motor 
Vehicles will be in effect for the first time for inspections commencing in April 
1980. 

This division is also responsible for the acquisition of replacement vehicle 

Personnel changes: Working Foreman Earle Townsend retired after 28 years of 
service to the Town. Norman Tisbert, Jr. was designated as Acting Working Forema 

PARKS 



The Park Division during the winter repairs and paints the benches, portable 
bleachers and backstops for all the baseball diamonds at the High School and the 
Little League Fields. 

All school baseball fields are raked, rolled and marked. The running tracks 
and soccer fields are prepared for all the school meets. 

Portable bleachers are erected at the school baseball and football fields. 

Fertilizer and seed, as needed, were applied in the Spring and Fall on all 
Town grassed areas, and over 65 acres of grass areas are cut each week during the 
growing season. 

Spraying was done, where required, to control infestation of Japanese beetle 

This year, 24 Town grass plot areas were mowed by private contractors during 
the growing season. 

In the fall, all necessary equipment is erected at the four school football 
fields and these fields are maintained and marked for each game. 

The Town acquired 24 acres of fields from the Sacred Heart sale of property 
the Town. A minimum of maintenance has been done to maintain these fields in fai: 
condition; much more renovations must be accomplished. 



The Park personnel return to the Highway Division during the winter season f 
maintenance of highways and sidewalks and Snow and Ice Control. 

58 



' i 









FORESTRY 



During 1979, the Forestry Division removed 183 trees ranging in size from 10" 
to over 30" in diameter. Fourteen of the trees were removed with contractor assis- 
tance . 

The division planted 41 trees consisting of the following varieties: London 
Planetree, Column Norway Maple, and Red Oak. A larger planting had been planned, 
but the supplier was unable to deliver Bradford Callery Pear trees which had been 
ordered. 

The division spent approximately 25% of available time pruning. Pruning con- 
sists of street-by-street pruning, problem tree pruning, storm repairs, flat-clear- 
ing whole streets of undesirable vegetation, and removing sight distance obstruc- 
tions at intersections and curves thus providing better visibility over distances. 

Spray operations included applications of both herbicides and insecticides. 
Herbicides were used to control weeds along guardrails, poison ivy, curbside weeds, 
and seeds in the shrub beds in the Central Park. Insecticides were sprayed to con- 
trol elm bark beetles, aphids, elm leaf beetles, Japanese beetles, fall webworm, 
hornets, and wasps. Spray operations are conducted by trained and licensed person- 
nel using approved chemicals and methods. 

In June, gypsy moths appeared in heavier than usual concentrations, especially 
in the east part of town. The infestation was too light to warrant a control spray 
beyond a few spot treatments, but its presence and a subsequent gypsy moth egg mass 
survey in early winter indicated that partial control measures may be necessary in 
the Spring of 1981; and full control measures may be necessary in the Spring of 1982 

Losses to Dutch Elm disease were heavier in 1979 than in the past several 
years. The 1979 increase can be traced to the late snowstorm in May 1977, that 
caused many broken branches . 

The elm bark beetles breed in dying elm tissue and these broken branches pro- 
vide many dispersed breeding sites for the beetles, allowing them to substantially 
increase their population in the Summers of 1977 and 1978. Elm bark beetles feed 
on healthy elm tissue, however, if the breeding site is diseased, then the beetles 
are covered with the sticky spores of the causal fungus of Dutch Elm disease. One 
bark beetle taking one bite and sloughing off one spore can transmit Dutch Elm 
disease to a large, healthy elm. 

In 1979, the division initiated a Dutch Elm disease control experiment using 
equipment loaned to the Division by the Andover Garden Club. The effectiveness of 
the experiment will be determined in the future. 

The mowing of roadside weeds was done by private contractors, and the Division 
mows individual problem areas and some Town-owned fields. During the winter months 
the Division continues with its shade tree maintenance duties and also plows snow 
for the Highway Division when needed. 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 



Spring Grove Cemetery is located in the southwesterly part of the town with 
the principal entrance at the junction of Abbott Street and Spring Grove Road. 

The cemetery contains about 60 acres of land, of which 14 acres are undevel- 
oped. It has been planned and developed to keep its natural beauty. Lots are 
available to meet all requirements. 

59 



Routine work consists of cutting the grass, trimming around the monuments, 
raking and cleaning up the grounds, cutting the brush, pruning of shrubs and trees, 
preparing of new gravesites, filling in sunken graves, grading and seeding of wintti 
graves, applying lime and fertilizers, keeping roads clear of snow, cementing foun- 1 
dations and interments. 

During snowstorms, cemetery personnel operate trucks and plows for the Highway 1 
Division. 

During the 12 month period, 31 new lots were sold and there were 87 interments' 
From the perpetual care payments on these lots and from payments by 1 lot owner 
placing his older lot into perpetual care, a total of $6,397.00 was added to the 
perpetual care fund. 

A total of $16,688.00 was received from the sale of lots, interments, founda- 
tions and from lots under annual care. These general receipts and the income from 
the Perpetual Care Fund were turned over to the Town Treasurer. 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 



The average daily flow to the plant was 27.6 mgd (million gallons per day) an 
Andover's flow was approximately 5 mgd or 18 percent of the total plant flow. 

Plant Operation: 

1) Screening Removal - 2,668 cubic feet of debris 

2) Primary Sedimentation 

Remove settleable organics, grit and floatable material 

Detention Time - 4 hours 

Removal 

32.7% of the BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand) 

50.0% of the SS (Suspended Solids) 

2,691 tons of dry solids 

3) Activated Sludge System (Biological Treatment) 

Removal 

68.4% of BOD 
56.3% of SS 

4) Overall Plant Removal 

78.8% of BOD 
78.1% of SS 

5) Solids Handling 

Total Sludge (dry) 6,686 tons 

Incineration Fuel Cost $8.45/ton 

Total Sludge Processing Cost $34.05/ton 

6) Septage Handling 

Provisions are available at the plant to accept septage for treatment. Sep- 
tage disposal from member communities is charged at a rate of $15 per load and Mas 
achusetts non-member communities $18 per load. Salem, New Hampshire, is charged 
rate of $25 per load. In 1979, the plant received 1,789 loads from within the di 
trict and 980 loads outside the district for a total of $72,869.59. 

General studies are underway in order to determine the feasibility of develo 
ment of low-head hydroelectric power from the plant's effluent and land disposal 
its sludge. 






60 



q 



Abate, Paul Jr. 

Allen, Patricia A. 

Amirto, Lawrence G. 

Anderson, C. Henry 

Anderson, Eloyce C. 

Anderson, Richard P. 

Anthony, Henry S. 

Arrigo, Mary Ann L. 

Banks, William F. 

Bartlett, Robert E. Jr 

Bartow, Leslie S. 

Batchelder, William H. 

Beckwith, Gertrude 

Belisle, Joan M. 

Beninati, A. George 

Benson, Evelyn M. 

Birdsall, Ernest L. 

Birnbach, Bernice 
a|Bissett, James 

Blake, Donald A. 

Bourque , Raymond 

Boyle, Peter A. 

Broaddus , Laura 

Brink, Michael R. 

Brodsky , Robert M. 

Brouck, Henry J. 

Brooks, Timothy A. 

Brown, Elaine D. 

Bruk , Gudrun K. 

Bruno, Louis M. 

Buck, W. Frank 

Budd , Mark 

Bullard, Sarah B. 

Bunnell, Thomas G. 

Burgess, Jane K. 

Burgess, Maureen G. 

Burke , Anne 

Burns, Marilyn F. 

Campbell, Michael S. 

Campion, David G. 

Care, Edgar W. 

Carlisle, Mary M. 

Carter, Cynthia Lois 

Carter, Mary E. 

Cat one, Melpo 

Cederberg, Ella A. 

Clark, James P. 

Clark, Robert L. 

Cleveland, Suzanne M. 

Clotworthy, Frances D. 

Collins, Ruth E. 

Collins, Thomas 
|Comeau, Joseph E. 
]Coolidge, Alden P. 

Coppeta, Robert A. 

Costello, MaryJane 

Cox, Martha Ann 

Connolly, Edmond 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1979 

Sr. Electrical Buyer 

Housewife 

Manager 

Engineer 

Senior Clerk 

Engineer 

Chemist 

Dental Assistant 

Real Estate Broker 

Production Manager 

Recreation Therapist 

Salesman 

Clerk 

Part-time Bookkeeper 

Bank President 

IRS Tax Examiner 

Accountant 

Legal Secretary 

Foreman 

Foreman 

Painting Foreman 

Banking 

Unemployed 

Manager 

President 

Tool & Die Maker 

Supervisor 

Housewi fe 

R.N./ Homemaker 

Real Estate Broker 

Engineer 

Assembler 

Part-Time Teacher 

Student 

Homemaker 

Student 

Homemaker 

Homemaker 

Salesman 

Salesman 

Computer Specialist 

Housewife 

Senior Clerk 

Housewife 

Stitcher 

Bookkeeper 

Project Engineer 

Senior Vice President 

Legal Typist 

Housewife 

Retired 

Engineer (Sr. Comp . ) 

Mgr . Data Processing Ctr 

Quality Control 

Senior Engineer 

Secretary 

Model 

Sales/Service Manager 



61 



4 Tanglewood Way(South) 
14 Lovejoy Road 
264 River Road 

14 Rennie Drive 
134 Summer Street 
123 Argilla Road 

7 Westwind Road 

11 Brentwood Circle 
10 Wildwood Road 

19 Juniper Road 
31 Bartlet Street 

17 Burton Farm Drive 
10 Crescent Drive 
242 Chandler Road 

12 Whispering Pines 
6 Westwind Road 

15 Pasho Street 

2 Bellevue Road 
34 Pasho Street 

127 Chandler Road 

13 Wildwood Road 
22 Juniper Road 
77 Bartlet Street 
10 Olympia Way 

396 South Main Street 
256 Andover Street 

38 Chestnut Street 

3 Glenwood Road 
120 Dascomb Road 

10 Shipman Road 

39 High Street 

74 Memorial Circle 
107 Highland Road 

28 Phillips Street 

91 Lowell Street 

42 Summer Street 

64 Haverhill Street 

85 Central Street 
6 Joseph Street 

76 Maple Avenue 
235 Haggetts Pond Road 

27 Strawberry Hill Road 
373 South Main Street 
2 Summer Street 

75 Harold Parker Road 
24 Lowell Street 

6 Eastman Road 
192 Holt Road 
130 Holt Road 
159 Holt Road 

406 Longwood Drive 
1 Standish Circle 
88 Poor Street 

20 Rock 0' Dundee Road 
112 Greenwood Road 

61 High Street 

7 York Street 

66 High Street 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1979 



Cox, Vincent T. 
Cronin, William J. 
Currie, Robert J. 
Daly, Susan T. White 
Damore , Anthony J. Jr. 
Davis, George W. 
Dean, Mary H. 
DeKavis, Beatrice L. 
Delaney, Alcea L. 
Demaso, James M. 
Derba, Robert M. 
Devlin, Thomas P. 
Dewhurst , Margaret D. 
DiDonato, Paul J. 
Dileso, Paul J. 
DiTroia, Anthony J. Jr 
DiTroia, Michael R. 
Douty, William F. Jr. 
Drew, Catherine J. 
D'Urso, Edward J. 
Eaton, James H. IV 
Emmett, Virginia L. 
Evans , Robert 
Fahey , James R. 
Fantini, George J. Jr. 
Farr , Nancy 
Finley, Carl J. 
Fionte, Rita M. 
Fisk, Ruth A. 
Fitzgerald, David J. 
Folley, Herbert R. 
Freitas, Edward 
Frishman , Ruth B. 
Gahan , John G. 
Gardner, Roger F. 
Gaunt , John E . 
Gauther, Claire M. 
Gauthier, Thomas W. 
Gilman, Donald M. 
Gioia, Alexander P. 
Goldman, Paul R. 
Gordon, Miriam Kate 
Gosse, Warren E. 
Graff, Robert A. 
Graninger, Dennis J. 
Grasso, James F. 
Gray, C. Kenneth 
Greenberg, Maxine B. 
Guerin, Albert J. 
Hale, Philip P. 
Haley, Doloris 
Hall, Elizabeth P. 
Halleran, Lawrence J. 
Halpert , Mindy G. 
Hanlon, Mark C. 
Harper, Polly 
Harriman, Mary 
Harris, Rosemary 



Chemical Salesman 


7 


Retired 


8 


Retired 


38 


Teacher /part- time 


11 


Data Editor 


432 


Self-employed 


81 


Purchasing Agent 


450 


Revenue Officer 


5 


Tumor Registrar 


42 


Supervisor 


2 


Self-employed 


7 


Molding Maker 


17 


Homemaker 


12 


Treasurer 


37 


Social Worker 


20 


Student 


1 


Cook 


1 


Equipment Operator 


136 


Housewife 


39 


Salesman 


9 


Survey Man 


80 


Unemployed 


43 


Unemployed 


75 


Dist . Manager 


13 


Loan Officer 


30 


Rental Secretary 


10 


Carpenter 


96 


Retired 


127 


Nurse 


362 


Sales 


322 


Retired 


75 


Production Manager 


23 


Clerk /Bookkeeper 


14 


Accountant 


A-2 


Sr . Engineer 


52 


Bank Manager 


84 


Housewife 


365 


Unemployed 


365 


Assistant Manager 


3 0B 


Superintendent 


10 


Furniture Mf gr . 


8 


Student 


16 


Letter Carrier 


93 


Manager 


14 


Senior Store Manager 


23E 


Machine Operator 


110 


Division Manager 


8 


Homemaker 


46 


Carpenter 


54 


Free Lance Artist Adv. 


147 


Homemaker 


57 


Accounting Dept . 


79 


Supervisor 


63 


Student 


7 


Customer Service Rep. 


39 


Sales Rep. 


128 


Housekeeper 


51 


Senior Clerk Typist 


11 



York Street 
Punchard Avenue 
Pearson Street 
Rose Glen Drive 
South Main Street 
Haggetts Pond Road 
South Main Street 
Juliette Street 
Wild Rose Drive 
Mitton Circle 
Whispering Pines 
Webster Street 
Rennie Drive 
Farrwood Drive 
Post Office Avenue 
Ivanhoe Lane 
Ivanhoe Lane 
Salem Street 
Prospect Road 
Sweetbriar Lane 
Argilla Road 
Elm Street 
Spring Grove Road 
Carmel Road 
Cutler Road 
Penobscot Way 
Woburn Street 
Salem Street 
High Plain Road 
River Road 
Essex Street 
Porter Road 
Castle Heights Road 
Colonial Drive 
Dascomb Road 
Summer Street 
High Plain Road 
High Plain Road 
Colonial Drive 
Flint Circle 
Joyce Terrace 
Florence Street 
Main Street 
Hartford Circle 
Lincoln Circle 
Lovejoy Road 
Deerberry Lane 
Sagamore Drive 
Maple Avenue 
River Road 
Harold Parker Road 
Tewksbury Street 
Lowell Street 
Wintergreen Circle 
Linwood Street 
Main Street 
North Street 
Dorset Circle 



62 



Harrison, William H. Jr. 
Hatfield, Harley F. 
He in, Matthew N. 
Hero, Carl 
Hevehan , Colleen A. 
Hinckley, Joseph B. 
Hindman , Marion D. 
Hinds, Mark F. 
Hirst , Dana C. 
Holihan, Loyola C. 
Holmes, J. Alan 
Holt , Patricia J . 
Hood, Dorris R. 
Hopwood , Peter J. 
Howes, Phyllis E. 
Hoyt , Marlene L. 
Hughes, Scott 
Hunt , Norman T . 
Hurlin, John C. 
Ingram, Richard L. 
Jaffe, Saul W. 
Jones, Philip S. 
Jorgensen , Catherine F. 
Joyce, F. Leo 
Kalman, Irene 
Karahalios, Calypso 
Katsiane, Richard H. 
Kesslak, Eleanor 
Kew, Kenneth P. 
Knipe, Diane 
Koffman, Philip J. 
Konstantinakos , Corinne J 
Krauson , Stephanie C. 
Krigbaum, Mary A. 
Krikorian, Rose 
Krochmal , Ann M. 
Lake, Janet D. 
Lalonde , Bernard L. 
Lambiris, Ellen B. 
Lane, Cyrill S. 
Lang, Helen R. 
Laquidara, Charles 
LaTorre , Margaret A. 
LaTorre , Philip 
Lebowitz, Scott E. 
Legallee, Phyllis C. 
Levinson, Shirley R. 
Lewis, Bonne 
Lindsay, Betty M. 
Long, Andrea J. 
Long, Charles E. 
Lussier, Lucien F. 
Lutsch, Linda 
Lyons, Cathy 
MacBride, Charles H. 
Maclnnis, Paul A.E. 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1979 

Marketing Services 253 

Technicial Sales Rep. 11 

Student 12 

Operation Mgr . 25 

Collating Clerk 17 

Unemployed 43 

At Home 10 

Landscape 207 

V.P. Operations 2 

At Home 151 

Manager 197 

Secretary 9 

Housewife 6 

Restaurant Mgr. 183 

Crossing Guard 11 

Mortgage Service Officer 2 

Mechanic 42 

Photo-typesetting 7 

System Engineer 29 

Psychiatric Asst . 398 

Representative 6 

Registered Pharmacist 8 
Liability Claim Supervisor 7 

Self-Employed 3 

Office Mgr. 4 

Secretary/Stenographer 13 

Edging Inspector 128 

At Home 68 

Manager 9 

Secretary 59 

Warehouse Supervisor 9 
Stewardess 

Housewife 11 

Housewife 27 

Unemployed 67 

Housewife 9 

At Home 22 

Advertising Sales Manager 8 

Housewife 15 
Delivery Driver Red Cross 23 

Asst. Mgr. Personnel 144 

Self-Employed 4 

Teacher Aide 17 
Director Personnel Services 17 

Student 122 

Senior Clerk 15 

Librarian 26 

Interior Decorator 7 

Surgical Assistant 233 

Part-time Office Clerk 109 

Vice President 8 

Plastic Technician 40 

Packer 182 

Student 30 

Part-Time Record Keeper 9 

Retired 54 



South Main Street 
Charlotte Drive 
Burton Farm Drive 
Lincoln Circle (East) 
Partridge Hill Road 
Elm Street 
Castle Heights Road 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Woodhill Road 
Argilla Road 
Highland Road 
Canterbury Street 
Juniper Road 
Woburn Street 
Greenwood Road 
Punchard Avenue 
Central Street 
Alderbrook Road 
Linda Road 
North Main Street 
Hawthorne Circle 
Maple Avenue 
Crescent Drive(Apt.8) 
Sandy Brook Circle 
Mohawk Road 
Launching Road 
Andover Street 
Pleasant Street 
Longwood Drive 
Essex Street 
Punchard Avenue 
Evergreen Lane 
Mohawk Drive 
Boutwell Road 
Memorial Circle 
Carriage Hill Road 
Greenwood Road 
Rasmussen Circle 
Shipman Road 
Salem Street 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Alderbrook Road 
Strawberry Hill Road 
Strawberry Hill Road 
Argilla Road 
High Street 
Birch Road 
Kirkland Drive 
Lowell Street 
Main Street 
Yardley Street 
Linwood Street 
Elm Street 
Washington Avenue 
Bellevue Road 
Shawsheen Road 



63 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1979 



Magane , Brenda L. 
Mahan , William F. 
Marchlik, Michael D. 
Mathias, Virginia L. 
Maietta, Eleanor A. 
Malcolm, Miller D. 
Mangulis, Elisabeth B. 
Masters, George E. 
Maxwell, Steven 
McDonald, Agnes M. 
McGrath, Mark H. 
McHendry, Walter J. 
McKain, James A. 
McKeown , Barbara 
McKew, Howard J. 
McKenna, Maureen S. 
McNally, Donald W. 
McNaught , Beatrice C. 
McParland, Marilyn J. 
Mercer, Ivy 
Meckel, James F. 
Mesler, Larry L. 
Mitchell , William J. 
Mooney, John II 
Moore, Donald S. 
Morehardt , Nancy D.E. 
Morkeski, Maureen 
Morkeski , Nancy 
Morrissette, Eleanor M. 
Muldoon, Arthur F. 
Murgia, Robert D. Jr. 
Murphy, James T. 
Murphy, Marie F. 
Nader, Valencia R. 
Nabydowski , Stanley J. 
Nagle , Mary E. 
Napolitan, Gilberta 
Nelson, John H. 
Nichols, Lawrence J. Jr 
Nichols, Shirley A. 
Nickerson , Virginia 
Nicoll, Cecile R. 
Nicolosi, Agatha 
Norris, David H. 
O'Brien, John D. Jr. 
O'Brien, Robert J. 
O'Connell, Stephen V. 
O'Hagan, Peter F. 
Olsen, Arthur Jr. 
Orenstein, Harold D. 
Ota, Mark D. 
Padva, Henry A. 
Palma, Joseph J. 
Pariseau, Ronald R. 
Pascucci , Paula 
Pasquale, Josephine T. 



Housewife 

Electronic Test Tech. 

Manager 

Student 

Homemaker 

Architect 

Registered Nurse 

Conductor 

Machine Operator 

Housewife 

Lab Tech. 

Ind. Engineer 

Senior Engineer 

Homemaker 

Engineer 

Registered Dietitian 

Machine Operator 

Homemaker 

Homemaker 

Retired 

Reliability Engineer 

Engineer 

Electrical Engineer 

Musician 

Cost & Systems Mgr . 

Supervisor 

Supervisor 

Solderer 

Housewife 

General Mgr. 

Student 

Retired 

Bookkeeper 

Inspector 

Farmer 

Bookkeeper 

Retired 

Master Electrician 

Self-Employed 

Dog Groomer 

Office Mgr/Bookkeeper 

Housewife 

Student 

Postal Clerk 

Student 

Principal Engineer 

Unemployed 

Mail Carrier 

Supervisor 

Retail Merchant 

Customer Service 

Pales Representative 

Sales Manager 

Self-Employed 

Instructor 

Salesperson 



9 Howell Drive 
34 Lowell Street 
29 Rutgers Road 

7 Brentwood Circle 
22 Bannister Road 
16 Porter Road 
36 Kirkland Drive 
16 Cross Street 
80 Essex Street 

2 McDonald Circle 
209 Greenwood Road 

16 Wild Rose Drive 
165 Shawsheen Road 

29 Farrwood Drive 
24 Tilton Lane 

10 Locke Street 
140 Andover Street 
66 River Road 
19 Wild Rose Drive 

256 North Main Street 

87 Ballardvale Road 
12 Fulton Road 

16 Korinthian Way 

7 Washington Avenue 
12 Longwood Drive 

122 Salem Street 

88 Carmel Road 

55 Memorial Circle 
27 Burton Farm Drive 
52 Woodland Road 

8 Canterbury Street 
288 River Road 

288 River Road 

30 River Street 

76 Blanchard Street 
77| School Street 

10 Bradley Road 

82 Gould Road 
180 Andover Street 
501 South Main Street 

60 Colonial Drive 

17 Chester Street 

3 Homestead Circle 
1 Walnut Avenue 

7 Serenity Lane 
6 Sandy Brook Circle 
36 Lovejoy Road 
1 Bakers Lane 

4 Farrwood Drive 

257 North Main Street 
160 Salem Street 

10 Hartford Circle 
14 Hansom Road 
36 Chandler Road 
22R Hidden Field Road 
147 Chestnut Street 



64 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1979 



Pellerin, Raymond A. 
Pelletier, Esther B. 
Peront , Madeleine M. 
Perreault, Geraldine D, 
Perreault, Paul H. 
Pettoruto, Elizabeth B. 
Piercy, Dorothy M. 
Pilelsky, Rhoda 
Powers, Barbara Ann 
Powers, Kathleen M. 
Pratt , Susan J . 
Prout , Terence P. 
Pustell, Margaret Ann 
Radford, Ray A. 
Randall, John F. 
Reddington, John B. 
Regan, Marcia L. 
Reed, Sylvia C. 
Read, William T. 
Reidy, Veronica 
Reilly, Anne M. 
Rembisz, Gail S. 
Ricci, Bernadette A. 
Ricker, Phyllis J. 
Rindone, Frank 
Riley, Laurence W. 
Robidoux, Ernest J. 
Robidoux, Richard J. 
Robinson, Wyley G. Ill 
Roche, Patrick J. Jr. 
Ross, Robert D. Jr. 
Roulston, Robert 
Sagaser, Catherine A. 
Sampiere, Frank N. 
Sanborn, Edith L. 
Schall, Margaret P. 
Sciuto, Grace 
Sanft, Marshall B. 
Scarpulla, Suzanne C. 
Seccareccio, Helen 
Seccareccio, Suzanne 
Sebell, Bruce E. 
Seikunas, Ruth E. 
Shapiro, John S. 
Shapiro, Patricia M. 
Sharrow, Arnold H. 
Sheedy , John J. 
Sheehan , Martha C. 
Sheehy , Catherine A. 
Sheehy, Mary T. 
Shepard, John A. 
Sherman , Jean 
Sherman, Natalie L. 
Shui, Ven H. 
Simpson, David T. 



Compositor 160 

Housewife 38 

Tax Examiner 440 

Housewife 31 

Upholstery 3 

Housewife 9 

Bus Driver 273 

Student 4 

Tax Clerk 75 

Dial Facilities Asst . 100 

Student 1 

Lab Technician 13 

Housewife 5 

Sales Engineer 5 

Investment Clerk 17 

Self-Employed 8 

Sr. Tester 78 

Secretary 11 

CPA 30 

Secretary 17 

State Employee 6 

Homemaker 4 

Group Leader 97 

Tax Examiner 4 

Equip. Editor 27 

USPS Letter Carrier 26 
Tool & Gage Lab. Inspector 66 

Position Mechanic 21 

Engineer 17 

V.P. Fin. & Admin. 46 

Senior Chemist 10 

Senior Buyer 59 

College Student 56 

Tool Designer/Draftsman 178 

Housewife 56 

At Home 22 

Lunch Supervisor 16 

Student 14 

Physical Therapist 3 

Executive Secretary 16 

Dental Assistant 25 

Senior Engineer 3 

Executive Secretary 21 
Electronic Design Engineer 27 

At Home 27 

Programmer 3 

Salesman 6 

Representative 10 

Student 22 

Housewife 112 

V.P. Sales 11 

At Home 6 

Housewife 23 

Research Scientist 39 

Chemical Mfgr. 12 



River Road 
Farrwood Drive 
Lowell Street 
McKenney Circle 
Middle Street 
Kathleen Drive 
North Main Street 
Eagle Way 
Lovejoy Road 
Washington Park Dr. 
Tobey Lane 
William Street 
Ivy Lane 
Olympia Way 
Oriole Drive 
Elysian Drive 
Chestnut Street 
Cabot Road 
Farrwood Drive 
Flint Circle 
Olympia Way 
Wintergreen Circle 
Haverhill Street 
Locke Street 
Rock Ridge Road 
River Road 

Lowell Junction Road 
Brundrett Avenue 
High Street 
Wildwood Road 
William Street 
Bartlet Street 
Chestnut Street 
North Main Street 
Jenkins Road 
Wildwood Road 
Farrwood Drive 
Kirkland Drive 
Olde Berry Road 
Bellevue Road 
Lowell Street 
Foster Pond 
Gould Road 
Chandler Road 
Chandler Road 
Lancaster Place 
Lamancha Way 
Bateson Drive 
Beech Circle 
Main Street 
Tiffany Lane 
College Circle 
Smithshire Estates 
Bannister Road 
Gray Road 



65 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1979 



Skinner, Mary R. 
Smith, Arthur W. 
Smith, Stephanie M. 
Snell, Frederick E. 
Souter, Charles R. 
Spear, Judith 
Spezzafero, Daniel A. 
Spires, Craig T. 
Stack, John J. 
Stafford, Walter F. Ill 
Strassel , Allen G. 
Staley, Robert 
Stephens, Whitman G. 
St . Jean, Donald F. 
St . Jean , George 
Stupack, Gregory 
Suchodolski, Edward 
Suhr , , Kenneth C. 
Sunderland, Myra E. 
Suter, Diane C. 
Tarbox, Gretchen A. 
Thibodeau, Marie A. 
Theriault , Henry L. 
Thomson, George P. 
Thorn, Alice R. 
Tremblay, Joanne M. 
Trepanier, Joseph F. 
Tufts, Jane E. 
Turpening, Roger M. 
Treska, Peter W. 
Van Laethem, Frank 
Verrette, Glenn P. 
Vogel , Seymour H. 
Warren, Jean W. 
Weber, Merle 
Wesolowski , Mary F. 
Wetterberg, Carl R. Jr. 
Whitworth, Grace M 
Wills, Geraldine A. 
Wilson, Eric K. 
Winter, Florence P. 
Winters, Brian P. 
Worontsoff, Walter G. 
Wright, Robert W. 
Yeaton , Leander G. Ill 
Young, Caroline M. 
Young, Christie D. 
Zaharris, Drake C. 
Zajicek, Margaret M. 
Ziegenbein, Barbara A. 
Young, Meredith L. 



Secretary 


67 


Sales Representative 


47 


Secretary 


21 


Production Engr. 


7 


Student 


49 


Supervisor 


60 


Warehouse 


C-l 


Salesman 


112 


Systems Standards Engr. 


45 


Staff Scientist 


60 


Technical Writer 


14 


Store Manager 


36 


Sales Manager 


13 


Mechanical Inspector 


143 


Art Gallery Technician 


53 


General Clerk 


18 


Representative 


123 


Plant Engineer 


139 


Accounts Payable Clerk 


6 


Research Technician 


23 


Program Associate 


18 


Jr. Clerk/Stenographer 


104 


President 


16 


Salesmanager 


57 


Part-time Office Secretary 


111 


Customer Service 


41 


Electrical Engineer 


134 


Project Editor 


4 


Research Seismologist 


48 


Stock Broker 


A-5 


Engineer 


443 


Student 


4 


Businessman 


15 


Housewife 


10 


Part-time Sales Clerk 


14 


Import/Export Agent 


10 


Clerk 


85 


Housewife 


19 


Student 


186 


Student 


9 


At Home 


32 


Painting Contractor 


28 


Food Service Director 


33 


Engineer 


10 


Sales Representative 


1 


Housewife 


96 


Animal Caretaker 


13 


Student 


5 


Microfilm Clerk 


72 


Teacher Aide 


117 


Student 


18 



Walnut Avenue 

Rattlesnake Hill Road 

Cuba Street 

Mercury Circle 

Wild Rose Drive 

Colonial Dr. Apt. 1 

Colonial Drive 

North Main Street 

Juniper Road 

Bartlet Street 

Elm Court 

Whittier Street 

Summer Street 

Chestnut Street 

Red Spring Road 

Nutmeg Lane 

Shawsheen Road 

Hidden Road 

Lincoln Circle 

McKenney Circle 

Cutler Road 

Red Spring Road 

Sheridan Road 

Haverhill Street 

North Main Street 

Pine Street 

Chestnut Street 

Dumbarton Street 

Clark Road 

Colonial Drive 

Lowell Street 

Gardner Avenue 

Birch Road 

Marion Avenue 

Longwood Drive 

Canterbury Street 

Lowell Street 

Johnson Road 

Elm Street 

Hidden Road 

Riverina Road 

McKenney Circle 

Balmoral Street 

Bellevue Road 

Arcadia Road 

Argilla Road 

Bellevue Road 

Chaise Circle 

Princeton Avenue 

Lovejov Road 
Summer Street 



66 






ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 26, 1979 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, February 20, 1979, the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover , qualified to vote in Elections and Town 
Affairs, met and assembled at the designated polling place. All eight pre- 
cincts; Precinct One, Precinct Two, Precinct Three, Precinct Four, Precinct 
Five, Precinct Six, Precinct Seven and Precinct Eight to vote at the Dunn 
Gymnasium, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road in said Andover, on 

MONDAY, THE TWENTY-SIXTH DAY OF MARCH, 1979 

at 8:00 o'clock A.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Essex, SS February 20, 1979 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at 
the time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a 
true and attested copy of the same, on the Town House, on each schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted, and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Benjamin C. Brown, Constable. 

ARTICLE 1. 

Took up Article 1 and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. 
The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 

The polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock P.M. 
The total number of ballots cast was 3,672, viz: 

Precinct 1- 503 Precinct 2-533 Precinct 3- 472 Precinct 4-439 
Precinct 5- 395 Precinct 6-487 Precinct 7- 395 Precinct 8-448 



PRECINCTS 














1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


MODERATOR FOR ONE YEAR 


416 428 


364 


348 


304 


370 


317 


354 


James D. Doherty 2901 


87 105 


108 


91 


91 


117 


78 


94 


Blanks 771 



SELECTMAN - 



















TWO FOR THREE YEARS 




219 


255 


199 


219 


230 


306 


234 


238 


Susan T. Poore 


1900 


244 


285 


237 


208 


168 


208 


170 


242 


Norma A. Gammon 


1762 


151 


163 


131 


122 


138 


129 


154 


130 


Nicholas D. Rizzo 


1118 


225 


225 


257 


216 


157 


181 


178 


191 


Philip J. Salamone 


1630 


167 


138 


120 


113 


97 


150 


54 


95 


Blanks 


934 



201 


230 


192 


176 


175 


233 


211 


254 


282 


276 


259 


233 


196 


221 


166 


163 


20 


27 


21 


30 


24 


33 


18 


31 



SELECTMAN - 

TO FILL A VACANCY (ONE YEAR) 
Thomas P. Stark 1672 
Lawrence J.Sullivan 1796 
Blanks 204 



67 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 26, 1979 

PRECINCTS 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 SCHOOL COMMITTEE- TWO for THREE YEARS 

2487 

2506 

882 

1469 



338 


341 


320 


308 


273 


348 


252 


307 


Joseph 


A. Finn 


343 


349 


309 


303 


256 


324 


302 


320 


John S. 


Eaton 


103 


133 


115 


101 


102 


124 


104 


100 


Edward 


Kaufman 


222 


243 


200 


166 


159 


178 


132 


169 


Blanks 





I 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY- 1 for 5 Yes 



412 


386 


360 


348 


291 


365 


311 


337 


91 


147 


112 


91 


104 


122 


84 


111 



Thomas R. Wallace 2810 
Blanks 862 

GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 
COMMITTEE - ONE FOR THREE YEARS 



392 


382 


338 


333 


292 


350 


306 


338 


James A. Booth 


2731 


111 


151 


134 


106 


103 


137 


89 


110 


Blanks 

TRUSTEES PUNCHARD FREE 
FIVE FOR THREE YEARS 


941 
SCHOOL 


341 


329 


309 


299 


254 


326 


277 


301 


Earl G. Efinger 


2436 


380 


378 


336 


305 


257 


331 


288 


314 


William V. Emmons 


2589 


342 


349 


317 


294 


254 


327 


285 


294 


Joan M. Lewis 


2462 


317 


306 


296 


279 


244 


322 


266 


287 


John R. Petty 


2317 


337 


327 


311 


300 


251 


313 


279 


298 


Margaret R. Porter 


2416 


798 


976 


791 


718 


715 


816 


580 


746 


Blanks 


6140 



All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and the check lists 
were used. 



REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 1 March 26, 1979 






Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 1004. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1005. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 495. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 7. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 1. Total number of ballots for computer count 503. Number of 
defective ballots 4. Number of ballots counted by computer 499. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Grand total for 
precinct 503 . Forrest H. Noyes, Jr. Warden. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 2 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 971. Total spoiled and unused ballots 972. Number 
of ballots machine voted at precinct 528. Number of absentee ballots machine 
voted at Town Clerk's Office 5. Number of absentee ballots received via 
mailing 0. Total number of ballots for computer count 533. Number of defect- 
ive ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 533. Number of write- 
in ballots processed 0. Number of overvoted ballots 0. Grand total for 
precinct 533. Fernand J. Lussier, Warden. 



68 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 26, 1979 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 3 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 1035. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1036. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 464. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 5. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 3. Total number of ballots for computer count 472. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 472. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand total 
for precinct 472. William H. Ammon , Warden. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 4 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 1065. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1066. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 434. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 4. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 1. Total number of ballots for computer count 439. Number of 
defective ballots 1. Number of ballots counted by computer 438. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand total 
for precinct 439. Norman P. Merrill, Warden. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 5 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 1109. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1110. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 390. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 0. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 5. Total number of ballots for computer count 395. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 395. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand total 
for precinct 395. Francis J. McBride, Warden. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 6 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 3. 
Number of unused ballots 1019. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1022. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 478. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 7. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 2. Total number of ballots for computer count 487. Number of 
defective ballots 1. Number of ballots counted by computer 486. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 1. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand total 
for precinct 487. Irving 0. Piper, Warden. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 7 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots recieved 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 0. 
Number of unused ballots 1114. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1114. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 386. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 7. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 2. Total number of ballots for computer count 395. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 395. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand total 
for precinct 395. Albert R. Retelle, Warden. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 8 March 26, 1979 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1500. Number of spoiled ballots 0. 
Number of unused ballots 1057. Total of spoiled and unused ballots 1057. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 443. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 4. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 1. Total number of ballots for computer count 448. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 448. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand total 
for precinct 448. Henry Hopkins, Warden. 



69 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 26, 1979 

Police Officers on Duty in Precincts: Sgt . Kevin Lynch, Steven Avery, Richard 
0. Aumais and Robert J. Fanning, Jr. 

After final action on Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue 
of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws to Monday, April 23, 1979, at 
7:30 P.M. at the case Memorial Cage, Phillips Academy. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, APRIL 23, 1979 

The check lists were used at the entrance to Case Memorial Cage and showed 
6 voters admitted to the meeting, lacking a quorum of 350. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED to 
adjourn the meeting at 7:35 P.M., to reconvene at 7:30 P.M. on Monday, May 
7, 1979, at the Case Memorial Cage, Phillips Academy. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING. 



MAY 7, 1979 



The check lists were used at the entrance to the Case Memorial Cage, 
Phillips Academy and showed 1057 voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 7:40 P.M, 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Jack L. Daniel, Jr. of the Free 
Christian Church. 

Salute to the flag was led by Col. Edward M. Harris, followed by the singing 
of America the Beautiful led by the Andover High School A Cappella Choir under 
the direction of Keith Gould and J. Everett Collins. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 19 non-voters. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the Auditorium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED that the Moderator be 
allowed to dispense with the reading of the Warrant, the return of service of 
the Constable, and that he be allowed to refer to the Articles by number as 
they appear in the Warrant. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, 
one Selectman for one year (to fill a vacancy), two members of the School 
Committee for three years, one member of the Andover Housing Authority for 
five years, one member of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical 
High School District Committee for three years, five Trustees of the Punchard 
Free School for three years and any other town officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot. 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot. The polls will be 
open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.. 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter announced the results of the election on March 26, 
1979 and declared James D. Doherty elected as Moderator and that he had pre- 
viously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of 
their offices. 



James D. Doherty 
Susan T. Poore 
Norma A. Gammon 
Lawrence J. Sullivan 
Joseph A. Finn 
John S. Eaton 
Thomas R. Wallace 
James A. Booth 



Moderator for One Year 

Selectman for Three Years 

Selectman for Three Years 

Selectman for One Year - to fill a vacancy 

School Committee for Three Years 

School Committee for Three Years 

Andover Housing Authority for Five Years 

Member of the Greater Lawrence Regional 

Technical High School District Committee 

for Three Years . 



70 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 7, 1979 



Earl G. Efinger ) Trustees of 

William V. Emmons 5 Punchard Free School 

Joan M. Lewis \ for Three Years 

John R. Petty 

Margaret R. Porter 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected 
by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Alcide J. LeGendre 
be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Annual Report of 
the Town Officers covering the period from January 1, 1978 through December 
31, 1978, in the Annual Town Report be accepted and placed on file. 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the 
Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available 
funds, to defray charges and expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, 
and to provide for a Reserve Fund for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1979 
and ending June 30, 1980. 

At this time an explanation was given by the Moderator as to the ramifi- 
cations of the proposed tax cap of 4% voted by the State Legislature, yet 
still unsigned by the Governor of the Commonwealth. 

The Town Meeting then voted overwhelmingly to vote each line item with a 
required vote of 2/3 instead of the usual requirement of majority vote. This 
would eliminate the necessity of the Town Meeting having to reconvene at a 
later date so as to reconsider a revised town budget should the governor and 
the Legislature enact into law a tax cap lower than 4%. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by more than two-thirds 
to raise and appropriate the following sums of money: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 



1. Town Moderator 

2. Board of Selectmen 

3. Board of Selectmen 

4. Finance Committee 

5. Finance Committee 

6. Town Manager 

7. Town Manager 

8. Data Processing 

9. Data Processing 



Personal Services $ 125.00 

Personal Services 6,200.00 

Other Expenses, including 

$100.00 for out-of-state 

travel 3,070.00 

Personal Services 980.00 

Other Expenses 10,065.00 

Personal Services 84,031.00 

Other Expenses, including 

$725.00 for out-of-state 

travel 9,845.00 

Personal Services 14,812.00 

Other Expenses, including 

$400.00 for out-of-state 

travel 30,520.00 



71 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 7, 1979 

10. Town Counsel Personal Services $ 17,000.00 

11. Town Counsel Other Expenses 30,000.00 

12. Town Clerk Personal Services 30,230.00 

13. Town Clerk Other Expenses, including 

$575.00 for out-of-state 

travel 5,220.00 

14. Elections and 

Registrations Personal Services 25,686.00 

15. Elections and 

Registrations Other Expenses 15,880.00 

16. Municipal buildings Personal Services 22,284.00 

17. Municipal Buildings Other Expenses 33,600.00 

18. Central Services Personal Services 2,250.00 

19. Central Services Other Expenses, including 

$150.00 for out-of-state 

travel 34,200.00 

20. Veterans Services Personal Services 24,827.00 

21. Veterans Services Other Expenses 1,572.00 

22. Veterans Services Assistance 45,000.00 



Total appropriated for line items 1-22 $447,397.00 

From taxation 447,397.00 

The Vote YES -- 875 NO - 7 more than 2/3. 

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE AND BUDGET 

23. Town Accountant Personal Services 54,156.00 

24. Town Accountant Other Expenses 15,925.00 

25. Collector-Treasurer Personal Services 65,187.00 

26. Collector-Treasurer Other Expenses, including 

$500.00 for out-of-state 

travel 12,635.00 

27. Board of Assessors Personal Services 72,217.00 

28. Board of Assessors Other Expenses, including 

$660.00 for out-of-state 

travel 19,435.00 

29. Central Purchasing Personal Services 18,951.00 

30. Central Purchasing Other Expenses, including 

$150.00 for out-of-state 

travel 6,015.00 

Total appropriated for line items 23-30 $264,521.00 



From taxation 264,521.00 

The Vote YES — 862 NO — 15 more than 2/3 



72 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 7, 1979 

31. Library Personal Services $ 409,259.00 

32. Library Other Expenses: $158,142.00 

less Dog License Reimbursements 
of $2,803.94 and Grants in Aid 
of $9,768.75 and State Reimburse- 
ments of $2,764.00 and including 
$650.00 for out-of-state travel 142,805.31 



Total appropriated for line items 31-32 $567,401.00 

from taxation 552,064.31 

The Vote YES -- 921 NO — 39 more than 2/3 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

33. Department of *Personal Services 116,701.00 

OA Community Services _... „ , ,. 

34. J Other Expenses, including 

$350.00 for out-of-state 

travel 74,185.00 

35. " " Special Program Account 45,000.00 

36. " " Gr. Lawrence Outreach 13,000.00 

37. " " Gr. Lawrence Mental Health 18,000.00 

38. Council on Aging Personal Services 22,442.00 

39. Council on Aging Other Expenses 13,750.00 

40. Council on Aging M. V. Home Care 2,200.00 

41. Council on Aging Special Program Account 15,000.00 



43. Com. Devel. & Plan. Other Expenses, including 

$1200.00 for out-of-state 



Total appropriated for line items 33-41 $320,278.00 

from taxation 320,278.00 

The Vote YES -- 686 NO — 15 more than 2/3. 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 



42. Com. Devel. & Plan. Personal Services 238,302.00 

Other Expenses, including 
$1200.00 for out-of-state 
travel. 67,485.00 



Total appropriated for line items 42-43 $305,787.00 

from taxation 305,787.00 

The Vote YES -- 539 NO -- 19 More than 2/3 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

44. Fire Department Personal Services 1,153,898.00 

45. Fire Department Other Expenses, including 

$600.00 for out-of-state 

travel. 89,660.00 

* It was also voted that the Community Service Dept. will submit a voucher for 
reimbursement from the Massachusetts State Department of Education for all evening 
practical arts courses that the Town offers to its citizens. 



73 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 7, 1979 

46. Police Department Personal Services 

$1,029,941.00 less 

$435,000.00 from Federal 

Revenue Sharing $ 594,941.00 

47. Police Department Other Expenses, including 

$1,000.00 for out-of-state 

travel 132,000.00 

48. Civil Defense Personal Services 1,500.00 

49. Civil Defense Other Expenses 1,025.00 

50. Animal Control Personal Services 21,480.00 

51. Animal Control Other Expenses 15,475.00 
Total appropriated for line items 44-51 $2,444,979.00 

from taxation $ 2,009,979.00 

The Vote YES — 377 NO — 39 more than 2/3. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to adjourn at 10:50 P.M. until Tuesday, May 8, 1979 at 7:30 P.M. in the Case 
Memorial Cage, Phillips Academy. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 8, 1979 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 836 voters admitted 
to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 7:50 P.M. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 12 non-voters to the meeting. 



ARTICLE IV (Cont) 



PUBLIC WORKS 



52. Highways Personal Services $ 307,707.00 

53. Highways Other Expenses 448,880.00 

54. General Admin. Personal Services 58,070.00 

55. General Admin. Other Expenses, including 

$500.00 for out-of-state 

travel 950.00 

56. Parks Personal Services . 89,557.00 

57. Parks Other Expenses 30,280.00 

58. Forestry Personal Services 91,109.00 

59. Forestry Other Expenses 20,035.00 

60. Vehicle Maintenance Personal Services 43,737.00 

61. Vehicle Maintenance Other Expenses 178,225.00 

62. Street Lighting 140,000.00 

63. Engineering Personal Services 56,049.00 

64. Engineering Other Expenses 1,675.00 

65. Sewer Personal Services 47,171.00 

66. Sewer Other Expenses 41,100.00 

67. Sewer Gr . Lawrence Sanitary District 

$409,528.00 less $385,000.00 

to come from the Sewer system 

Revenue Fund 24,528.00 



74 



68. 


Solid 


Waste 


69. 


Solid 


Waste 


70. 


Water 




71. 


Water 





ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 8, 1979 

Personal Services $ 11,550.00 

Other Expenses 312,056.00 

Personal Services 272,036.00 

Other Expenses, including 

$1,280.00 for out-of-state 

travel 439,120.00 

72. Spring Grove Cemetery Personal Services- 

$58,436.00 less investment 

income of $16,000.00 42,436.00 

73. Spring Grove Cemetery Other Expenses, including 

$150.00 for out-of-state 

travel 13,375.00 

Total appropriated for line items 52-73 $3,070,646.00 

from taxation $ 2,669,646.00 

The Vote YES — 668 NO — 4 more than 2/3. 

ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

74. Schools Personal Services 9,430,000.00 

75. Schools Other Expenses- 

$2,555,283.00 less $50,000.00 

from Public Law 874 and including 

$2,000.00 for out-of-state 

travel. 2,505,283.00 

Total appropriated for line items 74-75 $11,985,283.00 

from taxation 11,935,283.00 

The Vote YES — 558 NO -- 173 more than 2/3. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 11:10 P.M. until Wednesday, May 9, 1979, at 7:30 P.M. in the Case 
Memorial Cage, Phillips Academy. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 9, 1979 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 325 voters admitted 
to the meeting, lacking the required quorum of 350. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to adjourn at 8:25 P.M., until Monday, May 14, 1979 at the West Junior High 
School Auditorium, Shawsheen Road, Andover, Massachusetts at 7:30 P.M. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

The checklists were used at the entrance to West Jr. High School and showed 
538 Voters admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:45 P.M. 

ARTICLE VI (cont ) 

GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

76. Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 

Technical High School 153,932.00 

Total appropriated for line item 76 $153,932.00 

from taxation 153,932.00 

The Vote on this line item was unanimous. 

75 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

** UNCLASSIFIED 

77. Insurance $ 380,000.00 

78. Employees Benefits 215,000.00 

79. Patriotic/Civil Celebrations 7,600.00 

80. Veterans Headquarters Rentals 



81. Retirement Personal Services 11,664.00 

82. Retirement Other Expenses 825.00 

83. Pension Fund 492,850.00 

84. Non-Contrib. Pensions 71,722.00 

85. Unemployment Comp . 101,000.00 

86. Damages - Personal/Property 2,000.00 

Total appropriated for line items 77-86 $1,282,661.00 

from taxation $ 1,282,661.00 

The Vote on these line items was unanimous. More than 2/3. 

** Fred Fitzgerald who had previously been sworn to the faithful performance of 
his duties, acted as Moderator for line items 77-86. James D. Doherty assumed 
the gavel at line item 87. 

DEBT SERVICE 

87. *Interest Expense 670,650.00 

88. Bond Issue Expense 15,000.00 

89. Bond Redemption 1,665,000.00 
Total appropriated for line items 87-89 $2,350,650.00 

from taxation $ 2,350.650.00 

The Vote on these line items was unanimous. More than 2/3. 

*It was voted to table this item on May 14, 1979, and it was taken from the table 
on May 15, 1979. 

90. Compensation Fund 180,000.00 

91. Reserve Fund 150,000.00 
Total appropriated for line items 90-91 $330,000.00 

from taxation $ 330,000.00 

The Vote on these line items was unanimous. More than 2/3. 

TOTAL BUDGET APPROPRIATED $23,523,535.00. 

Total Budget from taxation $ 22,622,198.31 



76 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

ARTICLE 5 . To establish the salaries of the elected Officers for the 
ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the salaries of 
the elected Town Officers be as follows: 



Moderator : 



Selectmen - Chairman 
Selectmen - Members 



$100.00 for each annual Town Meeting and 

25.00 for each Special Town Meeting except 
when it falls within the Annual Town Meeting 

$1,000.00 per year 
800.00 per year 



ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Select- 
men and/or the Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts 
from time to time for the expenditures of any funds allotted to Andover 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U.S. Government under any State 
or Federal Grant Program, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 6 
as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to 
enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works 
Commissioners, the County Commissioners and/or either of them for the con- 
struction and maintainance of public highways in the town of Andover for 
the ensuing year. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 7 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in antici- 
pation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1979 in accord- 
ance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 8 
as printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and Town 
Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act to exempt 
from the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 31 (Civil Service) all po- 
sitions in the Andover Department of Public Works. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to raise $20,000.00 by taxation, 
by transfer from available funds, from conservation funds, by bonding or 
by any combination of the foregoing to purchase in fee or any lesser in- 
terest in all or part of the following described parcels of land located 
on the Westerly side of High Street, North of Walnut Avenue, Lots 3A , 3B , 
3C, 3D, 3E, of Assessors' Map 20, supposed to be owned by Wilfred 



77 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

Article 10 cont . 

Mullett; and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary property 

by purchase, by gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

On petition of John W. Donovan and others. 

Article 10 was Defeated. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by trans- 
fer, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
$50,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of designing, laying out and 
constructing playing fields on property owned by the Town of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 11 
as printed in the warrant in the amount of $21,500.00 from taxation. 
A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by G. Warren Patterson. 
ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to change the following described 
parcel of land from Industrial General to Residence C; namely, being Lot 29 
as shown on Assessors' Map 179, bounded and described substantially as 
follows : 

Westerly by the easterly line of Frontage Road Four Hundred 
Thirty and 08/100 (430.08) feet; 

Northerly by Lot One (1) as shown on plan hereinafter mentioned 
Three Hundred Forty (340) feet; 

Easterly Four Hundred Thirty and 08/100 (430.08) feet, 

Southerly Five Hundred Two and 65/100 (502.65) feet; and 

Southerly again Twenty (20) feet by the Westerly, Northerly and 
Northerly lines of a State Highway - Route 93, no access. 

All of said boundaries are determined by the Court to be located 
as shown on Plan No. 30282B, drawn by Andover Engineers, Inc., 
dated Octover 1962, as modified and approved by the Court, filed 
in the Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is 
filed with Certificate of Title No. 5325, Book 36, page 101, and 
being designated as Lot Two (2) thereon. 

Inserted by the Request of the Planning Board. 

Article 12 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning 
By-Law by inserting the following at the end of Section VI, Other Re- 
quirements, 

L. Design Advisory Group 

1) Establishment 

A Design Advisory Group (DAG) is hereby established, consisting 
of five members to be appointed by the Town Manager, comprising 
one nominee of the Planning Board, one nominee of the Historic 
Commission, one nominee of the Chamber of Commerce, and two 
others. Members shall, if possible, include an architect, a 
landscape architect, and a resident from within or near a General 
Business District. Members shall serve for three years or until 
their successors are appointed, except that of the five members 
first appointed, one shall serve for three years, two shall serve 
for two years and two shall serve for one year. 

2) Responsibilities 



78 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

(a) Anyone considering or anyone who has preliminary proposals for 
a new building, alteration or sign within any area zoned for 
General Business is strongly urged to consult with the DAG prior 
to seeking a permit. The DAG shall provide assistance in relating 
that proposal to the guidelines for the District. This may in- 
volve explaining these and other applicable guidelines, reviewing 
proposals, suggesting good examples of how others have responded 
in similar cases, and maintaining information regarding sources 

of design assistance. 

(b) In addition, whether or not requested by the applicant, the DAG 
shall review all applications for building permits, special per- 
mits, or variances for proposals located in areas zoned for Gen- 
eral Business if involving new construction, exterior alteration, 
or a sign larger than six square feet. An extra copy of all usual 
submittals required for such proposals shall be provided to the 
DAG through the Inspector of Buildings. The DAG review shall 
preferrably be done in consultation with the applicant and his 
designer, The DAG shall make an advisory report in writing to 
the applicant and as follows: 

(1) For building permits: to the Building Inspector regarding 
any changes to which the applicant has voluntarily agreed. 

(2) For Special Permits: to the Special Permit Granting Auth- 
ority regarding effect on the amenity of the neighborhood, 
as provided at VIII. C. 2. c. 

(3) For variances: to the Board of Appeals regarding possible 
detriment to the public good or derogation from the intent 
or purpose of this By-Law, as provided at VIII. B. 2. c. 

(c) Lack of a report from the DAG shall not be sufficient reason to 
delay action on a proposal which otherwise could be acted upon 
by the Building Inspector, Special Permit Granting Authority, or 
Board of Appeals. 

M. General Business District Design Guidance. 

The following guidelines indicate ways in which design of new develop- 
ment and change can be made supportive of Andover ' s General Business 
Districts. These guidelines are not mandatory, but degree of con- 
sistency with them shall be considered by the Special Permit Granting 
Authority in acting upon special permits and by the Board of Appeals 
in acting upon variances. 

1) Promote safety by avoiding pedestrian or vehicular hazards within 
the site or egressing from it. facilitating access by emergency 
vehicles, and facilitating visual surveillance by occupants, neigh- 
bors, and passers-by. 

2) Protect the natural environment by reducing the number of mature 
trees removed, reducing the volume of earth materials cut or filled, 
reducing soil erosion during and after construction, and reducing 
the extent of alteration in the amount, timing, and location of 
stormwater runoff from the site. 

3) Serve functional needs by avoiding inconvenience to pedestrians 
because of storm water ponding or flow, by assuring accessibility 
by the handicapped, and by providing microclimate control. 



79 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

4) Promote a pedestrian-oriented business area by applying the 
following : 

(a) To provide continuous visual interest and accessibility to 
the pedestrian, a major portion of the building facade at 
the street level which faces the street should be trans- 
parent. Bay windows and recessed doorways are particularly 
encouraged. 

(b) To maintain visual continuity, the entire lot width should 
be fully occupied by a building wall, fence, gate, shrubs 
or other landscape elements or as a pedestrian connection. 

(c) Building detailing should provide small-scale elements of 
interest from a pedestrian viewing distance. 

5) Promote enhancement of the established visual character of 
Andover's General Business Districts by the following: 

(a) Buildings need not conform to any specific style of archi- 
tecture. Enhancement of the Districts' diversity of styles 
is welcomed. 

(b) On the other hand, new efforts should avoid the removal, 
obscuring, or disruption of existing structures of his- 
toric value. 

(c) The appearance of materials characteristic of the area is 
preferred. These materials include brick and other unit 
masonry (painted or unpainted), granite and other cut 
stone, and painted clapboard. Uncharacteristic materials 
include rough, imitation, or reflective materials such as 
unpainted wood, field stone, stucco, exposed metal, imi- 
tation materials (e.g., false siding), mirror glass, por- 
celain enamel, or polished stone. Such appearance should 
generally be avoided; however, variation within the range 
of characteristic materials, colors, and textures is en- 
couraged when they are compatible with surrounding buildings. 

(d) To retain the small-scale character of Andover and to pro- 
mote diversity of design, a single building with a width 

of more than 40 feet facing a public way should, where feas- 
ible, be divided visually into sub-elements, preferably ex- 
pressing the functional diversity within the building. 

(e) To provide visual relief from buildings and hard materials, 
landscape treatment using shrubs, trees', flower boxes, and 
other greenery around buildings or in recessed spaces is 
encouraged. 

(f) Major visual exposure comes not only from the building front; 
therefore, full attention should be given to the treatment of 
sidewalks, landscaping, parking areas, and the building wall 
at the rear and sides. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the Andover 
Zoning By-Law by inserting the following at the end of Section VI, Other 
Requirements , 

L. Design Advisory Group 

1) Establishment 

A Design Advisory Group (DAG) is hereby established, consisting of 
five members to be appointed by the Town Manager, comprising one 



80 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

nominee of the Planning Board, one nominee of the Historic Com- 
mission, one nominee of the Chamber of Commerce, and two others. 
Members shall, if possible, include an architect, a landscape 
architect, and a resident from within or near a General Business 
District. Members shall serve for three years or until their 
successors are appointed, except that of the five members first 
appointed, one shall serve for three years, two shall serve for 
two year, and two shall serve for one year. 

2. Responsibilities 

(a) Anyone considering or anyone who has preliminary proposals for 
a new building, alteration, or sign within any area zoned for 
General Business is strongly urged to consult with the DAG 
prior to seeking a permit. The DAG shall provide assistance in 
relating that proposal to the guidelines for the District. This 
may involve explaining these and other applicable guidelines, 
reviewing proposals, suggesting good examples of how others 
have responded in similar cases, and maintaining information 
regarding sources of design assistance. 

(b) In addition, whether or not requested by the applicant, the DAG 
shall review all applications for building permits, special per- 
mits, or variances for proposals located in areas zoned for Gen- 
eral Business if involving new construction, exterior alteration 
or a sign larger than six square feet. An extra copy of all 
usual submittals required for such proposals shall be provided 
to the DAG through the Inspector of Buildings. The DAG review 
shall preferably be done in consultation with the applicant 

and his designer. The DAG shall make an advisory report in 
writing to the applicant and as follows: 

(1) For building permits: to the Building Inspector regarding 
any changes to which the applicant has voluntarily agreed. 

(2) For special permits: to the Special Permit Granting Auth- 
ority regarding effect on the amenity of the neighborhood, 
as provided at VIII. C. 2. c. 

(3) For variances: to the Board of Appeals regarding possible 
detriment to the public good or derogation from the intent 
or purpose of this By-Law, as provided at VIII. B. 2. c. 

(c) Lack of a report from the DAG shall not be sufficient reason 
to delay action on a proposal which otherwise could be acted 
upon by the Building Inspector, Special Permit Granting Auth- 
ority, or Board of Appeals. 

M. General Business District Design Guidance 

The following guidelines indicate ways in which design of new develop- 
ment and change can be made supportive of Andover's General Business 
Districts. These guidelines are not mandatory, but degree of consist- 
ency with them shall be considered by the Special Permit Granting 
Authority in acting upon special permits and by the Board of Appeals 
in acting upon variances. 

1) Promote safety by avoiding pedestrian or vehicular hazards within 
the site or egressing from it, facilitating access by emergency 
vehicles, and facilitating visual surveillance by occupants, 
neighbors, and passers-by. 

2) Protect the natural environment by reducing the number of mature 
trees removed, reducing the volume of earth materials cut or filled, 
reducing soil erosion during and after construction and reducing 



81 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

the extent of alteration in the amount, timing and location of 
stormwater runoff from the site. 

3) Serve functional needs by avoiding inconvenience to pedestrians 
because of storm water ponding or flow, by assuring accessibility 
by the handicapped, and by providing microclimate control. 

4) Promote a pedestrian-oriented business area by applying the following: 

(a) to provide continuous visual interest and accessibility to the 
pedestrian, a major portion of the building facade at the street 
level which faces the street should be transparent. Bay windows 
and recessed doorways are particularly encouraged. 

(b) To maintain visual continuity, the entire lot width should be 
fully occupied by a building wall, fence, gate, shrubs or other 
landscape elements or as a pedestrian connection. 

(c) Building detailing should provide small-scale elements of in- 
terest from a pedestrian viewing distance. 

5) Promote enhancement of the established visual character of Andover's 
General Business Districts by the following: 

(a) Buildings need not conform to any specific style of archi- 
tecture. Enhancement of the Districts' diversity of styles 
is welcomed. 

(b) On the other hand, new efforts should avoid the removal, ob- 
scuring, or disruption of existing structures of historic value. 

(c) The appearance of materials characteristic of the area is pre- 
ferred. These materials include brick and other unit masonry 
(painted or unpainted), granite and other cut stone, and painted 
clapboard. Uncharacteristic materials include rough, imitation, 
or reflective materials such as unpainted wood, field stone, 
stucco, exposed metal, imitation materials (e.g., false brick siding 
mirror glass, porcelain enamel, or polished stone. Such appear- 
ance should generally be avoided; however, variation within the 
range of characteristic materials, colors and textures is en- 
couraged when they are compatible with surrounding buildings. 

(d) To retain the small-scale character of Andover and to promote 
diversity of design, a single building with a width of more 
than 40 feet facing a public way should, where feasible, be 
divided visually into sub-elements, preferrably expressing 
the functional diversity within the building. 

(e) To provide visual relief from buildings and hard materials, 
landscape treatment using shrubs, trees, flower boxes, and 
other greenery around buildings or in recessed spaces is 
encouraged. 

(f) Major visual exposure comes not only from the building front; 
therefore, full attention should be given to the treatment of 
sidewalks, landscaping, parking areas, and the building wall 
at the rear and sides. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

The Vote YES — 408 NO — 8 Voted by more than the 2/3 required. 



82 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by trans- 
fer from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appro- 
priate the sum of $2,500.00 for seasonal lighting on the condition that 
the Town match contributions from the Andover Center Merchants on a dollar- 
for-dollar basis. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 14 
as printed in the warrant in the amount of $2,500.00 from taxation. 

ARTICLE 15 . The following Advisory Questions are submitted to the Town 
Meeting to aid the School Building Committee in arriving at their ultimate 
recommensation concerning East Junior High School and are set forth below: 

1. Shall the Building Committee proceed with the preparation of 
construction documents for a new East Junior High School in 
order to obtain actual bid costs for presentation to Town 
Meeting? 

2. Shall the Building Committee proceed with the preparation of 
construction documents for renovations of East Junior High 
School in order to obtain actual bid costs for presentation 
to Town Meeting? 

3. Shall the Building Committee proceed with the preparation of 
construction documents for renovations at West Junior High 
School in order to obtain actual bid costs for presentation 
to Town Meeting? 

4. Shall the Building Committee proceed with the preparation of 
construction documents for renovations and addition of an 
auditorium at Andover High School in order to obtain actual 
bid costs for presentation to Town Meeting. 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee and the School Building 
Committee. 

Article 15 was withdrawn. 

(At this point in the meeting a non-binding vote was taken and it was the 
concensus of those assembled, that the School Building Committee be advised 
that before any future East Junior High School specifications be put out to 
bid that the Town Meeting be apprised of and afforded the opportunity of 
voting any proposed project.) 

ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Public Way in name, 
BATES0N DRIVE, as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled : "Subdivision and Acceptance 
Plan, Bateson Drive, Andover, Massachusetts, Scale 1" = 40' said plan is re- 
corded in Essex No. District Registry of Deeds, as plan No. 6947 on November 
16, 1973. Plan and description align with the necessary deed or deeds and 
easements on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of James Bateson, Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 16 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear . 

ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
ALGONQUIN AVENUE, as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the 
Board of Selectmen as shown on a Plan entitled: Subdivision and Accept- 
ance Plan, Indian Ridge Development Corp., Engineer: Clinton F. 



83 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

Goodwin, Reg. Land Surveyor, Scale 1" - 50', Dated October 1, 1971," 
recorded with the North Essex Registry of Deeds, as Plan No. 6538. 
Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for recording 
purposes on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Louis D. Patracone and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 17 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear. 

ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
CHEROKEE CIRCLE , as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a Plan entitled: "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, 
Indian Ridge Estates, Subdivider, Indian Ridge Development Corp., Engineer 
Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Land Surveyor, scale 1" = 50' , Dated October 1, 1971.' 
Recorded with the North Essex Registry of Deeds, As Plan No. 6538. Plan and 
description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Louise D. Patracone and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 18 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear. 

ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the Conservation Fund 
the following amounts: 

$72,000.00 from Article 37 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970; 

7,847.00 from Article 32 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1972; 
said funds to be expended only upon such terms as the Board of Selectmen 
shall approve. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to transfer to the Con- 
servation Fund the following amounts: 

$72,000.00 from Article 37 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1970; 

7,847.00 from Article 32 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1972; 

said funds to be expended only for the purchase of the fee or any lesser 
interest in lands within the Fish Brook watershed already authorized for 
acquisition by Town Meeting action and only upon such .terms as the Board of 
Selectmen shall approve. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Com- 
mission to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L.'s Chapter 40, Section 
8C as amended, the fee or any lesser interest in the following described par- 
cels of land and the buildings thereon, shown on Subdivision and Acceptance 
Plan "Forest Hill Commons, Scale 1" =40'. February 28, 1968" and said plan 
is filed with North Essex Registry of Deeds as No. 5908 and supposed to be 
owned by Launching Road Trust of Andover; said parcels to be in care and 
control of the Conservation Commission: 

considered as one lot and consisting of 44,457 SF; 

345A, considered as one lot and consisting of 54,262 SF, 

Lot 344, 344A and 61A, considered as one lot consisting of 81,476 SF, 
more or less; 



84 



Lot 68, 


68A, 


346 


Lot 69, 


69A, 


69B 


more or 


less 





ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

Lot 36 and 36A , considered as one lot and consisting of 49,051 SF 
more or less; 

Lot 337 consisting of 42,617 SF , more or less; 

Lot 338 consisting of 42,342 SF , more or less; 

Lot 339 consisting of 36,929 SF . more or less; 

Lot 340, consisting of 36,824 SF , more or less; 

Lot 341 consisting of 38,082 SF , more or less; 

Lot 342 consisting of 33,583 SF, more or less; 

Lot 343 consisting of 45,674 SF , more or less; 

All of the right, title and interest of the owner in Thornbush Circle 
as shown on said plan; 

All said acquisitions to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund; 
all terms and conditions of the acquisitions to be subject to approval by 
the Board of Selectmen, The Conservation Commission is further authorized 
to apply for and accept any State Self-Help Funds under the provisions of 
G.L.'s Chapter 132A, Section 11 and enter into any contract thereto, or to 
apply for and accept any federal funds that may be available in connection 
with such acquisitions. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town authorize 
the Conservation Commission to acquire for Conservation purposes under G.L.'i 
Chapter 40, Section 8C , as amended, the fee or any lesser interest in the 
following described parcels of land and the buildings thereon, shown on 
Subdivision and Acceptance Plan "Forest Hill Commons, Scale: 1" = 40', 
February 28, 1968" and said plan is filed with North Essex Registry of Deeds 
as No. 5908 and supposed to be owned by Launching Road Trust of Andover; 
said parcels to be in the care and control of the Conservation Commission: 

Lot 68, 68A, 346 considered as one lot and consisting of 44,457 SF , 
more or less; 

Lot 69, 69A, 69B. 345, and 345A considered as one lot and consisting 
of 54,262 SF, more or less; 

Lot 344, 344A, and 61A considered as one lot consisting of 81,476 SF , 
more or less; 

Lot 336 and 336A, considered as one lot and consisting of 49,051 SF , 
more or less; 

Lot 337 consisting of 42,617 SF , more or less 

Lot 338 consisting of 42,342 SF, more or less 

Lot 339 consisting of 36,929 SF, more or less 

Lot 340 consisting of 36,824 SF, more or less 

Lot 341 consisting of 38,082 SF, more or less 

Lot 342 consisting of 33,583 SF , more or less 

Lot 343 consisting of 45,674 SF , more or less 

All of the right, title and interest of the owner in Thornbush Circle 
as shown on said plan; 
all said acquisitions to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund; 
all terms and conditions of the acquisitions to be subject to approval by the 
Board of Selectmen. The Conservation Commission is further authorized to 



85 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

apply for and accept any State Self-Help Funds under the provisions of 
G.L.'s Chapter 132A, Section 11, and enter into any contract thereto, or 
to apply for and accept any federal funds that may be available in con- 
nection with such acquisitions. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L.'s Chapter 40, 
Section 8C as amended the fee or any lesser interest in all or part of the 
following described parcels of land and building thereon, located on the 
easterly side of the valley of Fish Brook: said parcels to be in the care 
and control of the Conservation Commission. 

1. Lot 2 of Assessors' Map 189, supposed to be owned by Walter A. and 
Alice Disbrow, containing 9.91 acres, more or less; 

2. Lot 24A of Assessors' Map 168, supposed to be owned by Walter D. 
Belisle, containing 16.39 acres, more or less; 

3. Lot 25 of Assessors' Map 168, supposed to be owned by Walter D. 
Belisle, containing 4.13 acres more or less; 

4. Lot 43 of Assessors' Map 204, supposed to be owned by Gerald A. 
and Marie Rose Levesque , containing 3.21 acres, more or less; 

5. Lot 4 of Assessors' Map 169, supposed to be owned by Margaret 
Mooradian, containing 6.46 acres, more or less; 

6. Lot 5 of Assessors' Map 169, supposed to be owned by Margaret 
Mooradian, containing 27.11 acres, more or less; 

7. Lot 1 of Assessors' Map 145, supposed to be owned by Henry and 
Susan Hovanasian and Robert A. and Ann Maksisian, containing 22 
acres, more or less. 

8. Lot 9 of Assessors' Map 205, supposed to be owned by George Chongris, 
containing 1 acre, more or less; 

all said acquisitions to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund; 
all terms and conditions of the acquisititons to be subject to approval by 
the Board of Selectmen. The Conservation Commission is further authorized 
to apply for and accept any State Self-Help Funds under the provisions of 
G.L.'s Chapter 132A, Section 11 and enter into any contract thereto, or to 
apply for and accept any federal funds that may be available in connection 
with such acquisition. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 21 as 
printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to place in the care and control 
of the Conservation Commission under the provisions of G.L.'s Chapter 40, 
Section 8C as amended, the following parcels of land already voted to be 
acquired and some of which have been acquired by the Town of Andover for 
Conservation purposes: 

Area #1 - Shawsheen River Frontage 

All of Lot 6A of Map 73, 34,500 SF , more or less, supposed to be owned by 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover; 



86 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

Area #2 - Shawsheen River Frontage 

All of Lot 6B of Map 73, 2 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover; 

Area #3 - Wood Hill - Bald Hill 

Lot 1 of Map 172, 5,800 SF, more or less, supposed to be owned by the Inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot 2 of Map 193, 43.5 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the In- 
habitants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot 3 of Map 193, 46,845 SF, more or less, supposed to be owned by the In- 
habitants of the Town of Andover; 

Lots 4,5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 
24 of Map 193, total of 21 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Andover. 

Lot 1 of Map 194, 31.15 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the In- 
habitants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot3 of Map 194, 35,655 SF , more or less, supposed to be owned by the Inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Andover; 

Lots 4, 5, 6 and 7 of Map 194, total 143,951 SF , more or less, supposed to be 
owned by the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot 1 of Map 209, 39 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the Inhabit- 
ants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot 5 of Map 210, 16.04 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the In- 
habitants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot 6 of Map 210, 10.32 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by the In- 
habitants of the Town of Andover; 

Lot 2 of Map 209, 3 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Antonio 
Dispirito ; 

Lot 8 of Map 218, 22 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Baker's 
Meadow Realty Trust; (Neal Mitton, Herbert Schurian, Joseph A. Watson and 
Arthur Williams) 

Area #4 - Fish Brook Wetlands 

Lot 4 of Map 146, 12 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Anne Moor- 
adian and Sarkes Arakelian. 

Lot 1 of Map 170, 1 acre, more or less, supposed to be owned by Robert A. and 
Catherine T. Park; 

Lot 2 of Map 170, 3 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Robert A. 
and Catherine T. Park; 

Lot 4 of Map 170, 38 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by John and 
Mary Boloian; 

Lot 2 of Map 146, 20 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by John and 
Mary Boloian; 

Lot 1 of Map 169, 12 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Irving and 
Shirley Leoff; 

Lot 2 of Map 169, 18 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by James T. 
and Marie D. Murphy; 

Lot 3 of Map 189, 12 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by Ernest J. 
and Bette L. Henderson; 

Lot 3 of Map 172, 5.70 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by J. 
Terrence and Patricia A. Sullivan. 

87 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

Lot 3A of Map 172, 1.84 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by J. 
Terrance and Patricia A. Sullivan. 

Lot 7 of Map 172, 12.5 acres, more or less, supposed to be owned by J. Terrance* 

and Patricia A. Sullivan. 

■ 

and to authorize and direct the Conservation Commission, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen on behalf of the Town, to enter into any agreement that j 
it deems advantageous with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under the pro- 
visions of the Self-Help Act, Chapter 132A, Section 11, and with the Federal 
Government, for partial reimbursement of the costs of such acquisitions. 

This article is to correct former articles which failed to make reference to 
the custody and control of such land by the Conservation Commission. This 
correction is necessary for the Town to obtain Self-Help reimbursement for 
said acquisition. 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 22 as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to provide equal legal support for 
all its past and present elected and appointed Town Officials who are or have 
been sued in their individual capacities for actions taken in good faith 
during their terms of office by providing (1) counsel of the Official's 
choice, (2) equal indemnification, and (3) equal financial payments for the 
above and all related legal proceedings. 

On petition of Frederick Fitzgerald and others. 

Article 23 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 24 . To see of the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-Law 
by inserting the following at the end of VI, A. 5. a. (General Regulations re- 
garding parking in the General Business District): 

(9) Where alternative access locations are feasible, parking lot 
driveways shall not provide access onto Main Street unless 
granted a Special Permit by the Board of Appeals upon its 
determination that such access onto Main Street is dictated 
by considerations of safety, congestion, or conflict with 
other premises. 

(10) No parking area shall be located in front of any principal 

building facing Main Street, Barnard Street, Central Street, 
Chestnut Street, Park Street west of Bartlet, Post Office Ave- 
nue, or Elm Street, unless granted a Special Permit by the 
Board of Appeals upon its determination that such placement 
is dictated by location of existing buildings or other pec- 
uliarities of the site. 

Inserted at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the Zoning 
By-Law by inserting the following at the end of VI. A. 5. a. (General Regulations 
regarding parking in the General Business District): 

(9) Where alternative access locations are feasible, parking lot 
driveways shall not provide access onto Main Street unless 
granted a Special Permit by the Board of Appeals upon its 
determination that such access onto Main Street is dictated 
by considerations of safety, congestion, or conflict with 
other premises. 

88 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

(10) No parking area shall be located in front of any principal 

building facing Main Street, Barnard Street, Central Street, 
Chestnut Street, Park Street west of Bartlet, Post Office 
Avenue or Elm Street, unless granted a Special Permit by the 
Board of Appeals upon its determination that such placement 
is dictated by location of existing buildings or other pec- 
uliarities of the site. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

The Vote YES — 397 NO — 19 More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $12,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of 
acquiring by purchase, by gift or by right, of eminent domain for Municipal 
Buildings or other municipal purposes all or a portion of the following 
described parcel of land and buildings thereon: 

Map # Lot # Supposed to be owned by Area +/- 

55 71 Cyr Oil Company 4,568 sq.ft. 

and, further, to authorize the application for and acceptance of any State 
and/or federal aid that may be available in connection with such acquisition; 
or to take any other action relating to the foregoing. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 25 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to instruct its Representative and 
Senators in the General Court to enter a bill in the 1979 Session of the Gen- 
eral Court that would allow those persons that are physically disabled, and 
those that are over 70 years old to vote by mail for the secret ballot session 
of Annual Town Meetings; if they so desire and make known their wish to the 
Town Clerk not less than 15 days before the stated time for the start of an 
Annual Town Meeting. 

On petition of Karl Haartz and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 26 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell 
the so-called Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium on Haverhill Street upon such terms 
and conditions as the Selectmen may order. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 27 as printed 
in the warrant be stricken and the following be substituted: That the Town 
Manager appoint a committee of five to study the uses of said Cardinal Cushing 
Gymnasium and report back to the October Special Town Meeting with its 
recommendations . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by G. Warren Patterson. 

ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
the sum of $120,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of reconstructing 
the so-called Recreation Park Lodge. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 



89 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 14, 1979 

Article 28 was defeated. The Vote YES — 276 NO — 174 Less than 2/3 requi] 

(The Selectmen had inserted this article contingent on the sale of the 
Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium. When Article 27 was amended and passed without 
the sale of the gymn , the Selectmen wanted to withdraw Article 28 because 
of the lack of necessary funds. However the Tiown Meeting opted to vote the 
amendment with funds being derived from Free Cash in turn necessitating a 2/3 
vote requirement for passage.) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
COMANCHE PLACE, as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board 
;of Selectmen as shown on a Plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, 
Indian Ridge Estates, Subdivider Indian Ridge Development Corp., Engineer: 
Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Land Surveyor, Scale 1" = 50', dated October 1, 1971, 
recorded with the North Essex Registry of Deeds, as Plan No. 6538. Plan and 
description, along with all necessary papers for recording purposes on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Louis D. Patracone and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 29 
as printed in the warrant . 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
IROQUOIS AVENUE, as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the Board 
of Selectmen as shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision and Acceptance Plan, 
Indian Ridge Estates, subdivider, Indian Ridge Development Corporation., 
Engineer: Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Land Surveyor, scale 1" = 50', dated 
October 1, 1971," recorded with the North Essex Registry of Deeds, as Plan 
No. 6538. Plan and description, along with all necessary papers for re- 
cording purposes on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Louis D. Patracone and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 30 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear. 

ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $200, 000 . 00 for the purpose of undertaking and 
completing a property value equalization program and to authorize the Town 
Manager to engage professional consultants or employees for this purpose. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve ARTICLE 31 
in the amount of $200,000.00 from taxation, as printed in the warrant. 

The Vote YES — 350 NO — 36. More than the 2/3 required. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to adjourn at 10:25 P.M. until Tuesday, May 15, 1979 in the West Junior 
High School Auditorium on Shawsheen Road. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed 400 voters admitted to 
the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 8:22 P.M. 



90 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $270,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of 
replacing the sanitary sewer in Lucerne Drive, Pine Street and Summer Street, 
beginning at Lucerne Drive and extending southerly across country to Pine 
Street and Summer Street, to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary 
temporary construction easements and permanent easements by purchase, by gift 
or by seizure by right of eminent domain, and to take any other action re- 
lating thereto. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the sum 
of $270,000.00 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of constructing sewers 
to replace the sanitary sewer in Lucerne Drive, Pine Street and Summer Street 
beginning at Lucerne Drive and extending across country to Pine Street , and 
Summer Street. That the Selectmen are hereby authorized to acquire the ne- 
cessary temporary construction easements and permanent easements by purchase, 
by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain, and that to meet such appro- 
priation the Town Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen is 
hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding $270,000.00 at one time or from 
time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General 
Laws as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes therefor. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

The Vote YES -- UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend ARTICLE XII Miscellaneous 
By-Laws by inserting the following as Section 22: 

Section 22. Storage of Inflammables 

All licenses granted by the Board of Selectmen for the storage of 
inflammables in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 148, Sec- 
tion 13 of the Massachusetts General Laws shall be subject to the 
following Fee Schedule; 

License Fee $30.00 

Annual Certificate of Registration Fee: 

1 to 999 gals 5.00 

1,000 gals to 14,999 gals 10.00 

15,000 gals and up 15.00 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article XII 
Miscellaneous By-Laws by inserting the following as Section 22: 

Section 22. Storage of Inflammables 

All licenses granted by the Board of Selectmen for the storage of 
inflammables in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 148, Sec- 
tion 13 of the Massachusetts General Laws shall be subject to the 
following Fee Schedule: 

License Fee $30.00 

Annual Certificate of Registration Fee: 

1 to 999 gals 5.00 

1,000 to 14,999 gals 10.00 

15,000 gals and up 15.00 

Article 33 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 



91 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

The Town Meeting then voted to accept and read into the record the following 
resolution presented by Stephen C. Flashenberg: 

Be it hereby resolved that : 

WHEREAS, the citizens and property owners of the Town of Andover were en- 
dangered by the flooding conditions which resulted from the unusually heavy 
rains which inundated the northeastern United States on January 25, 1979, and 

WHEREAS the flood waters of the Shawsheen River threatened to damage or de- 
stroy the Riverina Road Pumping Station, which event would have resulted in 
great and irreparable harm to the lives and property of said citizens and 
property owners, and 

WHEREAS, the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover wish to formally recognize 
amd commend the efforts of the many officials and employees of the Town who 
worked tirelessly to avert the catasrtophic results which would have occurred 
from the loss of the Riverina Road Pumping Station, 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, THAT the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover 
assembled at the 1979 Annual Town Meeting held on May 15, 1979, hereby extend 
their deep appreciation and thanks to all those persons who performed yeoman 
service in behalf of the Town, with a special commendation to the Town Man- 
ager, Mr. Jared S. A. Clark, and to the Director of the Department of Public 
Works, Mr. Robert E. McQuade , and Mr. James F. Johnson having given of them- 
selves far beyond the call of duty. 

ARTICLE 34 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the issuance of Bonds 
or Notes in the sum of $400,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of funding 
and restoring to the Treasury the cost of reconstructing and making extra- 
ordinary repairs to the sewer trunk line damaged by the flood conditions 
which occurred on or about January 25, 1979, said reconstruction and repairs 
having been undertaken and payment of liabilities incurred therefor authorized 
and provided from funds in the Treasury under the emergency provisions of the 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 31, and, further, to authorize the Select- 
men and the Town Manager to Petition the General Court for the passage of a 
Special Law to authorize said bonds or notes to be issued to validate the 
action taken hereunder, or to take any other action relative to the foregoing 
matters. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to transfer 
$100,000.00 from available funds for the purpose of funding and restoring to 
the Treasury the cost of reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to 
the sewer trunkline damaged by the flood conditions which occurred on or 
about January 25, 1979, said reconstruction and repairs having been under- 
taken and payment of liabilities therefor authorized and provided from the 
funds in the Treasury under the emergency provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 31. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

The Vote YES — UNANIMOUS More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 35 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII Miscellaneous 
By-Laws by inserting the following as Section 24: 

Section 24: Emergency Reporting Equipment and Procedures 

SECTION 1: DEFINITIONS: 

For the purpose of this by-law, the following terms shall have the definitions 
herein ascribed to them: 

1.1 Automatic Protection Device : An electrically operated instrument com- 
posed of sensory apparatus and related hardware which automatically 



92 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

sends over regular telephone lines, by direct connection or otherwise, 
a pre-recorded voice alarm upon receipt of a stimulus from the sensory 
apparatus that has detected a physical force or condition inherently 
characteristic of a fire or unauthorized intrusion. 

1.2 Central Station Protective System : A system, or group of systems, operated 
for its customers, by a person, firm or corporation with a franchise from 
the Town, in which the operations of electrical protection circuits and 
devices are transmitted to, recorded in, maintained and supervised from 

a central station or modified central station. 

1.3 Direct Line : A telephone line leading directly to the communications 
center of the Fire Department or Police Department that is for use only 
to report emergency messages and signals on a person-to-person basis. 

1.4 Indication : The instrumentation on a monitor panel at the receiving ter- 
minal of a signal line which produces both visual and audible alarm sig- 
nals when activated by a signaling device in the same electrical circuit 
at an identifiable location or origin. 

1.5 Key (To a Telephone Line) : To use a telephone line for transmitting a 
message, either by direct connection or by a mechanism not so connected 
that utilizes the microphone of a standard telephone to do so. 

1.6 Primary Trunkline : A telephone line leading into the communication cen- 
ter of the Fire Department or Police Department that is for the purpose 
of handling emergency calls on a person-to-person basis, and which line 
is identified by a specific listing among the emergency numbers in the 
telephone directory issued by the Telephone Company serving the Town. 

1.7 Signal Line : A line not connected to any standard telephone equipment 
which leads into an indicator panel in the communications center of the 
Police Department or to such a panel in either a central station pro- 
tective system or a modified central station and which is designed to 
transmit electrically an alarm signal readily identifiable as to location 
of origin. 

1.8 Special Trunkline : A telephone line leading into the communications cen- 
ter of the Fire Department or the Police Department that is for the pri- 
mary purpose of handling emergency messages which originate from auto- 
matic protection devices and are transmitted directly or through an 
intermediary . 

SECTION 2: AUTOMATIC PROTECTION DEVICES - RESTRICTIONS ON KEYING 

2.1 No automatic protection device that is installed after the effective date 
hereof by any person on premises of any kind in the Town of Andover shall 
be keyed to a primary trunkline. 

2.2 After the effective date hereof, any alarm equipment supplier who installs 
automatic protection devices in the Town for the purpose of sending pre- 
recorded emergency messages directly to the Fire Department or the Police 
Department shall first obtain necessary instructions, including a desig- 
nated telephone number, from the particular department concerned with the 
types of messages in order to key such devices to a special trunkline 
into that department. 

2.3 Within ninety (90) days after the effective date hereof, all automatic 
protection devices in the Town that were keyed on that date to a primary 
or secondary trunkline shall be disconnected therefrom. The owner or 
lessee of any such device shall be responsible for the disconnecting of it 

2.4 An owner or lessee of an automatic protection who has it disconnected as 
required by (2.3) of this section, may authorize an alarm equipment sup- 
plier to key the automatic protection device to a special trunkline into 
the Fire Department or the Police Department, provided that the device 
meets operational requirements, as set forth in this ordinance. 



93 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

SECTION 3: SAME KEYING TO INTERMEDIARIES AUTHORIZED TO RELAY MESSAGES 

3.1 Any person who has an automatic protection device in the Town may arrange 
to have such device keyed to any intermediaries who are authorized to re- 
lay emergency messages to the Fire Department or Police Department over 
a special trunkline. 

SECTION 4: OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

4.1 Automatic Protection Devices installed on the premises of any kind in the 
Town that are keyed to a special trunkline shall meet minimum operational 
requirements, as determined by the police or Fire Chief. 

4.2 No recorded message shall be delivered to the Police or Fire Department 
more than three times as a result of a single stimulus of the sensory 
mechanism. 

4.3 The time gap between delivery of each recorded message must be in the 
range from ten (10) to twelve (12) seconds. 

4.4 The length of time for transmitting the recorded message must not ex- 
ceed fifteen (15) seconds. 

4.5 All telephone reporting devices will be equipped with an off and on 
switch which in the event of an alarm that is activated which is false, 
the owner may shut recording device off and notify the proper department 
immediately that it is a false alarm. 

4.6 The sensory mechanism used in connection with such devices must be ad- 
justed to suppress false indications of fire or intrusion so that the 
devices will not be actuated by impulse due to transient pressure changes 
in water pipes, short flashes of light, wind noise such as rattling or 
vibrating of doors or windows, vehicular noise adjacent to the install- 
ation or other forces unrelated to genuine alarms. 

4.7 All components comprising such device must be maintained by the owner 
in good repair to assure reliability of operation. 

SECTION 5: INSTRUCTIONS ON OPERATIONS 

5.1 Each alarm equipment supplier that sells or leases to a person an auto- 
matic protection device which is installed on such person's premises in 
the Town after the installation hereof, and which is keyed to a special 
trunkline, shall furnish that person with written instruction as to the 
way the device operates, along with a maintenance manual and a correct 
circuit diagram pertaining to such device. 

5.2 Prior to the installation of an emergency reporting systems, an install- 
ation permit shall be obtained from the electrical inspector. The fee 
for said permit shall be established by the Board of Selectmen. 

SECTION 6: TESTING 

6.1 No person shall conduct any test or demonstration on an automatic pro- 
tection device or a signaling device designed to make direct connection 
with headquarters of the Fire Department or Police Department without 
first notifying the Chief of the department concerned with the particular 
kind of alarm. 

SECTION 7: SIGNALING DEVICES AND INDICATOR DEVICES 

7.1 Every alarm equipment supplier who wants to connect automatic protection 
devices in the Town to the Police or Fire Department alarm board shall 
furnish the Police or Fire Chief with a current list of such install- 
ations showing the following: 



94 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

1. Name, residence address, and telephone number of owner or lessee 

2. Address or place where device is installed and telephone number at 
that location. 

3. Name and telephone number of two (2) other persons at different 
locations who is authorized to respond to an emergency and open 
the place where the device is installed and be able to reset, or 
terminate such device if found to be defective. 

7.2 The supplier will contact the Town contractor ten (10) days in advance 
of connection to the Town Board. 

7.3 Telephone lines will by ordered by the Town contractor. 

SECTION 8: OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS - IF CONNECTED TO AN OUTSIDE ALARM 

8.1 The length of time for alarm ringing outside must not exceed fifteen 
(15) minutes. 

SECTION 9: FINES AND CANCELLATION OF SERVICE 

9.1 The following shall not count as false alarms: 

1. Town Power Failure 

2. Telephone Company Repair 

3. Results of Major Storm 

4. 30 Day New Installation 

5. Break Activation, Fire or Smoke Activation 

9.2 If an automatic protection device is activated with the exception of the 
above in 9.1, the owner shall be allowed up to six (6) false alarms per 
year. After the sixth false alarm, the owner will be charged $10.00 for 
each additional alarm until a yearly total of nine (9) at which time the 
owner will be notified that his alarm will be disconnected from the Town 
Board. If the alarm is received by Special Trunkline, the owner will be 
required to disconnect such device until it has been satisfactorily 
repaired. 

9.3 A hearing may be requested before the termination from the Town Board, 
or the special trunkline within five (5) days of official notification 
of such termination either by the Town or Town Alarm Board Contractor. 
The hearing will be held with the Police Chief or the Fire Chief of the 
Department that the disconnection is being made. 

SECTION 10: LIABILITY OF TOWN LIMITED 

10.1 The Town shall take every reasonable precaution to assure that alarm and 

pre-recorded messages received by the Town are given appropriate attention 
and are acted upon with dispatch. The Town shall not be liable for any 
defects in operation of automatic protection devices and signal line 
systems, for any failure or neglect to respond appropriately upon receipt 
of an alarm from such a source. In the event that the Town finds it 
necessary to disconnect a defective automatic protection device or sig- 
naling device, the Town shall incur no liability by such action. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend ARTICLE XII, 
Miscellaneous By-Laws by inserting the following as Section 24: 

Section 24: Emergency Reporting Equipment and Procedures 
SECTION 1: DEFINITIONS: 



95 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

For the purpose of this By-Law the following terms have the definitions 
herein ascribed to them: 

1.1 Automatic Protection Device : An electrically operated instrument com- 
posed of sensory apparatus and related hardware which automatically 
sends over regular telephone lines, by direct connection or otherwise, 
a pre-recorded voice alarm upon receipt of a stimulus from the sensory 
apparatus that has detected a physical force or condition inherently 
characteristic of a fire or unauthorized intrusion. 

1.2 Central Station Protective System : A system, or group of systems, op- 
erated for its customers by a person, firm or corporation with a fran- 
chise from the Town in which the operations of electrical protection 
circuits and devices are transmitted to, recorded in, maintained and 
supervised from a central station or modified central station. 

1-3 Direct Line : A telephone line leading directly to the communications 

center of the Fire Department or Police Department that is for use only 
to report emergency messages and signals on a person-to-person basis. 

1.4 Indication : The instrumentation on a monitor panel at the receiving 
terminal of a signal line which produces both visual and audible alarm 
signals when activated by a signaling device in the same electrical 
circuit at an identifiable location or origin. 

1.5 Key (To a Telephone Line) : To use a telephone line for transmitting a 
message, either by direct connection or by a mechanism not so connected 
that utilizes the microphone of a standard telephone to do so. 

1.6 Primary Trunkline : A telephone line leading into the communication 
center of the Fj re Department or Police Department that is for the pur- 
pose of handling emergency calls on a person-to-person basis, and which 
line is identified by a specific listing among the emergency numbers in 
the telephone directory issued by the Telephone Company serving the Town. 

1.7 Signal Line : A line not connected to any standard telephone equipment 
which leads into an indicator panel in the communications center of the 
Police Department or to such a panel in either a central station pro- 
tective system or a modified central station and which is designed to 
transmit electrically an alarm signal readily identifiable as to location 
of origin. 

1.8 Special Trunkline : A telephone line leading into the communications cen- 
ter of the Fire Department or the Police Department that is for the pri- 
mary purpose of handling emergency messages which originate from auto- 
matic protection devices and are transmitted directly or through an 
intermediary . 

SECTION 2: AUTOMATIC PROTECTION DEVICES - RESTRICTIONS ON KEYING 

2.1 No automatic protection device that is installed after the effective date 
hereof by any person on premises of any kind in the Town of Andover shall 
be keyed to a primary trunkline. 

2.2 After the effective date hereof, any alarm equipment supplier who installs 
automatic protection devices in Town for the purpose of sending pre- 
recorded emergency messages directly to the Fire Department or the Police 
Department shall first obtain necessary instructions, including a desig- 
nated telephone number, from the particular department concerned with the 
types of messages in order to key such devices to a special trunkline 
into that department . 



96 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

2.3 Within ninety (90) days after the effective date hereof, all automatic 
protection devices in the Town that werp keyed on that date to a primary 
or secondary trunkline shall be disconnected therefrom. The owner or 
lessee of any such device shall be responsible for the disconnecting 

of it. 

2.4 An owner or lessee of an automatic protection who has it dis- 
connected as required by (2.3) of this section, may authorize an alarm 
equipment supplier to key the automatic protection device to a special 
trunkline into the Fire Department or the Police Department, provided 
that the recorded message shall not be transmitted for a period of time 
exceeding three (3) minutes. 

SECTION 3: SAME KEYING TO INTERMEDIARIES AUTHORIZED TO RELAY MESSAGES 

3.1 Any person who has an automatic protection device in the Town may arrange 
to have such device keyed to any intermediaries who are authorized to 
relay emergency messages to the Fire Department or Police Department over 
a special trunkline. 

SECTION 4: OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS - FOR NEW INSTALLATIONS 

4.1 Automatic protection devices installed on premises of any kind in the 
Town that are keyed to a special trunkline shall meet minimum operational 
requirements as determined by the Police or Fire Chief. 

4 . 2 No recorded message shall be delivered to the Police or Fire Department 
more than three times as a result of a single stimulus of the sensory 
mechanism. 

4.3 The time gap between delivery of each recorded message must be in the 
range from ten (10) to twelve (12) seconds. 

4.4 The length of time for transmitting the recorded message must not ex- 
ceed fifteen (15) seconds. 

4.5 All telephone reporting devices will be equipped with an off and on 
switch which in the event of an alarm that is activated which is false, 
the owner may shut recording device off and notify the proper depart- 
ment immediately that is a false alarm. 

4.6 The sensory mechanism used in connection with such devices must be ad- 
justed to suppress false indications of fire or intrusion so that the 
devices will not be actuated by impulse due to transient pressure changes 
in water pipes, short flashes of light, wind noise such as rattling or 
vibrating of doors or windows, vehicular noise adjacent to the install- 
ation or other forces unrelated to genuine alarms. 

4.7 All components comprising such device must be maintained by the owner 
in good repair to assure reliability of operation. 

SECTION 5: INSTRUCTIONS ON OPERATIONS 

5.1 Each alarm equipment supplier that sells or leases to a person an auto- 
matic protection device which is installed on such person's premises in 
the Town after the installation hereof, and which is keyed to a special 
trunkline, shall furnish that person with written instruction as to the 
way the device operates, along with a maintenance manual and a correct 
circuit diagram pertaining to such device. 

5.2 Prior to the installation of an emergency reporting system, an install- 
ation permit shall be obtained from the electric inspector. The fee 
for such permit shall be established by the Board of Selectmen. 



97 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

SECTION 6; TESTING 

6.1 No person shall conduct any test or demonstration on an automatic pro- 
tection device or a signaling device designed to make direct connection 
with headquarters of the Fire Department or Police Department without 
first notifying the Chief of the Department concerned with the parti- 
cular kind of alarm. 

SECTION 7: SIGNALING DEVICES AND INDICATOR DEVICES : 

7.1 Every alarm equipment supplier who wants to connect automatic pro- 
tection devices in the Town to the Police or Fire Department alarm 
board shall furnish the Police or Fire Chief with a current list of 
such installations showing the following: 

1. Name, residence address, and telephone number of owner or lessee. 

2. Address or place where device is installed and telephone number at 
that location. 

3. Name and telephone number of two (2) other persons at different 
locations who is authorized to respond to an emergency and open 
the place where the device is installed and be able to reset, or 
terminate such device of found to be defective. 

7.2 The supplier will contact the Town contractor ten (10) days in advance 
of connection to the Town Board. 

7.3 Telephone lines will be ordered by the Town contractor. 

SECTION 8: OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS - IF CONNECTED TO AN OUTSIDE ALARM 

8.1 The length of time for alarm ringing outside must not exceed fifteen 
(15) minutes. 

SECTION 9: FINES AND CANCELLATION OF SERVICE 

9.1 The following shall not count as false alarms: 

1. Town Power Failure 

2. Telephone Company Repair 

3. Results of Major Storm 

4. 30 Day New Installation 

5. Break Activation, Fire or Smoke Activation 

9.2 If an automatic protection device is activated with the exception of 
the above 9.1, the owner shall be allowed up to six (6) false alarms 
per year. After the sixth false alarm, the owner will be charged 
$15.00 for each additional alarm until a yearly total of nine (9) 

at which time his alarm may be disconnected from the Town Board upon 
notification of the chief of the department. If a defective alarm is 
received by special trunkline, the owner will be required to disconnect 
such device until it has been satisfactorily repaired. 

9.3 A hearing may be requested before the termination from the Town board, 
or the special trunkline within five (5) days of official notification 
of such termination either by the Town, or Town Alarm Board contractor. 
The hearing will be held with the Police Chief or the Fire Chief of the 
Department that the disconnection is being made. 

SECTION 10: LIABILITY OF THE TOWN LIMITED 

10.1 The Town shall take every reasonable precaution to assure that alarm 
and pre-recorded messages received by the Town are given appropriate 



98 



ADJOURNED ANNAUL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

attention and are acted upon with dispatch. The Town shall not be liable 
for any defects in operation of automatic protection devices and signal 
line systems, for any failure or neglect to respond appropriately upon 
receipt of an alarm from such a source. In the event that the Town finds 
it necessary to disconnect a defective automatic protection device or 
signaling device, the Town shall incur no liability by such action. 
Article 35 passed by a Majority Vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to petition the Legislature to enact a law authorizing the Town to pay bills 
of the Andover Electric Company in the amount of $3,835.86 which bills were 
incurred as a result of a misinterpretation of the State Bidding Laws. The 
School Department has received the labor and materials furnished by the Andover 
Electric Company. 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 36 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $3,835.86 from taxation. 

The Vote YES — UNANIMOUS more than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 37 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
the sum of $3,000.00 or any other sum for continuation of the Andover His- 
toric Building Survey and to authorize the Town Manager to apply for and 
receive available Federal and State matching funds. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 37 as 
printed in the warrant in the amount of $2,500.00 from taxation and $2,500.00 
from a grant-in-aid. 

A report of the Planning Board was read by G. Warren Patterson. 

ARTICLE 38 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
the sum of $75,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of making energy-con- 
serving repairs and improvements to various municipal buildings. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 38 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $25,000.00 from taxation. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by G. Warren Patterson. 

The Vote YES -- UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to support commuter rail service 
and authorize the Selectmen as a matter of policy to instruct the Town Man- 
ager and/or Andover 's Representative to the Merrimack Valley Regional Transit 
Authority to vote and enter into a contract for this service. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the Town 
Manager be authorized to enter into a contract with the Merrimack Valley 
Regional Transit Authority for commuter rail service subject to the following 
conditions : 

1. That State and Federal participation and the method of regional allocation 
of costs will be such that the net cost of rail service to Andover will 
not exceed $45,000.00 in Fiscal Year 1980 or Fiscal Year 1981. 



99 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

2. That Andover be able to terminate service with notice of not more than 
60 days. 

3. That in the case of termination of service, Andover be liable only for: 
(a) its pro rata share of capital expenses, including debt service, which 
shall have been incurred by the Merrimack Valley Regional Transit Auth- 
ority up to but not including the day on which the municipality gives 
notice of its decision to terminate any such service; and (b) its share 
of operating expenses, pro rated through the final day of service to 
Andover . 

4. And such other conditions as the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen 
may determine. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson . 

The Vote YES — UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 40 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $1,250,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of 
laying and relaying water mains of sixteen (16) inches in diameter or more 
in the following areas: 

Osgood Street Andover Street Dascomb Road 

Woburn Street Clark Road Interstate Route 93 

and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase 
by gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $1,250,000.00 
be hereby appropriated for the purpose of laying and relaying water mains of 
sixteen (16) inches in diameter or more in the following areas: 

Osgood Street Andover Street Dascomb Road 

Woburn Street Clark Road Interstate Route 93 

Tewksbury Street 

that the Selectmen are hereby authorized to acquire the necessary easements 
in connection therewith by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain and that to meet such appropriation the sum of $45,124.90 shall be 
transferred from the unexpended balance of the appropriation raised under 
Article 8 of the 1976 Annual Town Meeting, the sum of $36,697.30 shall be 
raised from the unexpended balance of the appropriation raised under Article 
14 of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting and the Town Treasurer with the approval 
of the Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding $1,168,177.80 
at one time or from time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 
8(6) of the General Laws as amended and supplemented or any other enabling 
authority, and to issue bonds or notes therefor. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

The Vote YES — 285 NO 29 More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $110,000.00 to construct a sanitary sewer in Os- 
good Street; and further to authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary 
temporary construction easements, and permanent easements, by purchase, by 
gift, or by seizure by right of eminent domain. Betterments are to be 
assessed for the entire costs of the project against the land owners who will 
benefit by said construction, as allowed in G.L.'s Chapter 80. 



100 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 
Article 41 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 42 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation , by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
the sum of $10,000.00 pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53C, 
for the purpose of paying for the costs associated with the assignment of 
paid detail and other overtime work in the Andover Police Department and 
charging the contracting agencies thereof for such administrative and other 
associated costs. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 42 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to transfer to the jurisdict ion 
and control of the Conservation Commission for all the purposes included in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C as amended, the following described 
land now owned by the Town of Andover; 

That portion of each of the following lots lying between the 
Shawsheen River and a line marked "top of steep slope" shown 
on a plan entitled "Site Plan, Existing Recreation Areas on 
Land of the Brothers of the Sacred Heart ; Scale 1" = 80', 
John Avery, Jr., Town Engineer, October 1976.:" 

1. Lot 2 of Town Map 36 

2. Lot 7 of Town Map 36 

3. Lot 8 of Town Map 36 

4. Lot 5 of Town Map 37 

5. Lot 4 of Town Map 37 

Inserted at the request of the Conservation Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 43 as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

The Vote YES -- UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 44 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
SEMINOLE CIRCLE, as approved by the Planning Board and layed out by the 
Board of Selectmen as shown on a Plan entitled: "Subdivision and Acceptance 
Plan, Indian Ridge Estates, Subdivider, Indian Ridge Development Corp., En- 
gineer Clinton F. Goodwin, Reg. Land Surveyor, Scale 1" = 50'. Dated October 
1, 1971." Recorded with the North Essex Registry of Deeds, as Plan No. 6538. 
Plan and description , along with all necessary papers for recording purposes 
on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Louis D. Patracone and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 44 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear . 

ARTICLE 45 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
LARCHMONT CIRCLE, as shown on a Plan of Land which was approved by the And- 
over Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision 
and acceptance plan Larchmont Circle, Andover, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', Sept- 
ember 18, 1974, Developer Baker's Meadow Realty Trust, Andover Consultants, 
Inc., Engineer" and said 



101 






ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

plan is recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 
7498. Plan and description along the the necessary deed or deeds and easements 
on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Joseph W. Watson. Jr. and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 45 as 
printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Rhys Kear . 

ARTICLE 46. To see how the Town will vote to instruct its Senators and Rep- 
resentative in the Great and General Court, 

RESOLUTION ON LOCAL CONTROL OVER COUNTY BUDGET EXPENDITURES 

WHEREAS, county government in the Commonwealth is supported entirely 
by local property taxes, and 

WHEREAS, county government officials who must set local tax rates, do 
not have adequate control over how those funds are spent on 
the county level; and 

WHEREAS, county government will continue for the forseeable future to 
constitute a significant cost to local governments... 

urge the members of the General Court to enact legislation 
in this session to grant control over county budgets to 
county advisory boards made up of local officials. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 46 as 
printed in the warrant and further that the report of the Elderly Tax Exemption 
Study Committee be referred to our State Legislators for review and implemen- 
tation as appropriate. 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing, or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $1,000,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of 
installing storm drains and to authorize the Selectmen to acquire on behalf 
of the Town by purchase, by gift or by seizure by right on eminent domain the 
necessary temporary construction easements and permanent easements and to take 
any other action related thereto. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the sum of 
$1,000,000.00 be hereby appropriated for the purpose of constructing sewers 
and surface drains for storm drainage, that the Selectmen are hereby author- 
ized to acquire on behalf of the Town by purchase, by gift or by seizure by 
right of eminent domain the necessary temporary construction easements and 
permanent easements, and that to meet such appropriation the Town Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding 
$1,000,000.00 at one time or from time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 
44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, or any other 
enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes therefor. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

The Vote YES — UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 48 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate 
the sum of $100,000.00 for the purpose of installing storm drains; and to 
authorize the Selectmen to acquire the necessary easements by purchase, by 
gift or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 



102 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen 
Article 48 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 49 . To see if the Town will vote to pursue and petition the Bureau 
of Accounts, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to effect enterprise fund account- 
ing for the Water and Sewer Divisions of the Andover Department of Public 
Works. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 49 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 50 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Article IV of the Town's 
By-Laws by inserting after Section 9 a new item entitled "Section 6, Stabil - 
ization Fund :"(As permitted under Chapter 40, Section 5B of the General Laws) 
and which states that ; 

"The Warrant for each Annual Town Meeting shall contain an Article 
that reads substantially as follows: 'To see what sum, if any, that 
the Town will vote to use as a stabilization fund.'" 

On petition of Karl Haartz and others. 

Article 50 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 51 . To see whether the Town under and pursuant to authority granted 
in General Laws Chapter 40D, Section 21(G), as amended, will authorize the 
Town Manager to enter into a contract for operation of solid waste disposal 
facility to be established in the Town of North Andover for the disposal of 
acceptable waste and for the use of By-products resulting from the operation 
of such facilities which contract will: 

1. be for term of twenty years, more or less; 

2. include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts 
of acceptable waste and payments for the use of the fac- 
ilities to be based in part thereon; 

3. provide for unit prices for the disposal of acceptable 
waste that will be graduated and for adjustments thereof, 
for the use or sale of steam, electricity and other by- 
products resulting from the use of the facility, and for 
credits or payments to the Town resulting therefrom; 

4. provide for similar commitments by other communities; 

5. provide for the use by the Town, other municipalities or 
other persons of the uncommitted capacity of such facility; 

6. contain other provisions incidental and related to the fore- 
going general matters; and, 

7. be generally in the form of proposed contract (Copies of 
which are on file in the office of the Town Clerk and the 
Town Manager where they may be examined during office hours) 
negotiated by representatives of the member communities of the 
Northeast Solid Waste Committee (NESWC) with such changes there- 
in as may be approved by the Board of Selectmen; 

or enter into some other contract for the disposal of solid waste with any 
other disposal facility under such terms and conditions more favorable to 
the Town of Andover as the Selectmen may determine. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 51 was withdrawn. 



103 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



MAY 15, 1979 



ARTICLE 52 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing, or by any combination of the fore- 
going and appropriate the sum of $195,000.00 or any other sum for the pur- 
pose of repairing the roof and other portions of the Bancroft School or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of 
be hereby appropriated for the purpose of making extraordinary rep 
roof and other portions of the Bancroft School and that to meet su 
priationm the sum of $9,276.06 shall be transferred from the unexp 
ance of the appropriation raised by transfer under Article 1 of th 
1967 Special Town Meeting and Article 17 of the 1968 Annual Town M 
the construction of the Bancroft School and the Town Treasurer wit 
val of the Selectmen is hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding 
at one time or from time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 44, 
of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, or any other enab 
ority, and to issue bonds or notes therefor. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 



$194,276.06 
airs to the 
ch appro- 
ended bal- 
e August 21, 
eeting for 
h the appro- 
$185,000.00 

Section 7(3A 
ling auth- 



The Vote 



YES — 313 



NO — 7 



More than the 2/3 required 



ARTICLE 53 . To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations 
and free cash in the Treasury. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following balances 
be lapsed and returned to Certified Free Cash: 



Art. 


15 


- 1968 


Annual 


T 


M 


Art. 


13 


- 1967 


Annual 


T 


M 


Art . 


10 


- 1975 


Oct. Sp 


T 


M 


Art. 


2 


- 1976 


Aug. Sp 


T 


M 


Art. 


44 


- 1977 


Annual 


T 


M 


Art. 


17 


- 1973 


Annual 


T 


M 


Art. 


45 


- 1974 


Annual 


T 


M 


Art. 


61 


- 1971 


Annual 


T 


M 


Art. 


2 


- 1973 


Oct.Sp 


T 


M 


Art. 


21 


- 1977 


Oct . Sp 


T 


M 


Art. 


1 


- 1977 


Oct . Sp 


T 


M 


Art. 


4 


- 1977 


Oct.Sp 


T 


M 



East Jr. High Remodeling 
Bancroft Reservoir 
Plans - Water Distrib. 
Easements Water Mains 
Repairs - Abbot Well 
West Andover Sewer 
Ballardvale Sewer 
Pomps Pond Dike 
Tea Lots 

Albee/Shattuck Lots 
Board of Health Supp . 
Highway Temp. Leave 

TOTAL 



538.30 

2,096.44 

1,566.20 

10,000.00 

5,277.95 

80,000.00 

3,652.08 

2,258.49 

2,166.42 

100.00 

962.95 

4,500.00 

113,118.83 



ARTICLE 54. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to 
use in Free Cash to Reduce the 1979-1980 Tax Rate and to affect appropriations 
voted at the 1979 Town Meeting. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the Town 
retain the sum of $1,250,000.00 in Certified Free Cash and further that the 
Assessors be permitted to use the balance of the Free Cash to reduce the 
Fiscal Year 1980 Tax Rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 1979 
Annual Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing a sum not to ex- 
ceed $10,000.00 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior 
fiscal years. 



104 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the Town 
transfer from available funds the sum of $2,307.07 to pay the following un- 
paid bills incurred in prior fiscal years: 

1. Dalrymple Oil Co. Municipal Buildings $ 49.45 

2. Phinney's Conserv. Comm. 4.44 

3. Philip B. Herr & Assoc. Planning Board 1,538.15 

4. Idak Convalescent 

Centers, Inc. Veterans 461.43 

5. Andover Townsman School 22.00 

6. Andover Townsman Town Manager 47.00 

7. Walden Paper Co. Municipal Buildings 29.90 

8. Science Research School 94.80 

9. Delta Education School 59.90 

$ 2,307.07 

ARTICLE 56 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Assessors to pre- 
pare a tax commitment in accordance with the provisions of G.L.'s Chapter 59, 
Section 21, 23, 24, 25 and 26V as in force and effect January 1, 1979, to 
fund such articles of appropriation voted and approved by the Annual Town 
Meeting, April, 1979, and deemed necessary by those present and voting to 
provide for the proper and efficient operation of the Town of Andover and 
the Andover School Department and to provide for all other assessments which 
have been lawfully charged to the Town of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 56 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 57 . To see if the Town will vote to petition the executive office for 
administration and finance, local finance appeals board of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts or any other Legislative or executive body, division or 
agency as may be established to exempt from tax cap legislation expenditures 
and appropriations for the following: 

1. Such sums as may be necessary to pay for the cost of existing 
labor contracts, labor contracts to be negotiated and applicable 
during FY80 and FY81 which are within the Federal Wage and Price 
Guidelines and the conferring of like and similar benefits and 
wage and salary adjustments to the independent employees of the 
Town of Andover and the Andover School Department ; 

2. To pay for the costs of an equalized valuation program and all 
other state mandated programs or portions thereof which are un- 
funded or underfunded by the state; 

3. To pay for the costs of repairs to the Bancroft School and other 
emergency repairs and replacements of Town or School property con- 
nected with the January, 1979, flood, other natural disasters as 
may occur or anything related thereto; 

4. And to pay for the appropriation and expenditure of any funds levied 
against the Town of Andover by any other autonomous school, county 
government or agency, court, board of binding arbitration, or other 
agency, board, commission or tribunal which, because of the force of 
law, has the ability to compel the appropriation and expenditure of 
funds assessed against the Town of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 57 was withdrawn. 



105 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MAY 15, 1979 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to dissolve the 1979 Annual Town Meeting at 10:10 P.M. 

The Foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 



ATTEST: 






Elden R. Salter, CMC 
Town Clerk 



106 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on September 18, 1979, 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover, qualified to vote in Town Affairs, 
met and assembled in the West Junior High School Auditorium, Shawsheen Road 
in said Andover on Monday, the fifteenth day of October, 1979 at 7:30 P.M. 

The Meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 7:40 P.M. 

Check lists were used at the entrance and showed 425 voters admitted to 
the meeting. 

Salute to the Flag was led by Selectman Col. Edward M. Harris. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the auditorium. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 33 nonvoters to the meeting. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the reading of the 
Warrant and the return of service of the Constable be dispensed with, and 
that the Moderator refer to the Articles by number and subject matter. 

Essex, SS. September 20, 1979 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at 
the time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a 
true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse and 
in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Thomas P. Eldred 



Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see whether the Town under and pursuant to authority granted 
in General Laws Chapter 40D, Section 21 (G), as amended, will authorize the 
Town Manager to enter into a contract for operation of a solid waste dis- 
posal facility to be established in the Town of North Andover for the dis- 
posal of acceptable waste and for the use of by-products resulting from the 
operation of such facilities which contract will: 

1. be for a term of twenty years, more or less; 

2. include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of acceptable 
waste and payment for the use of facilities to be in part thereon; 

3. provide for unit prices for the disposal of acceptable waste that 
will be graduated and for adjustments thereof, for the use or sale 
of steam, electricity and other by-products resulting from the use 
of the facility, and for credits or payments to the Town resulting 
therefrom ; 

4. provide for similar commitments by other communities; 

5. provide for the use by the Town, other municipalities or other 
persons of the uncommitted capacity of such facility. 

6. contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing 
general matters; 

7. be generally in the form of the proposed contract (copies of which 
are on file in the office of the Town Clerk and the Town Manager 
where they may be examined during office hours) negotiated by rep- 
resentatives of the member communities of the North East Solid 
Waste Committee (NESWC) with such changes therein as may be approved 
by the Board of Selectmen; and 



107 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 

8. or enter into some other contract for the disposal of solid waste with 
this or any other disposal facility under such terms and conditions 
more favorable to the Town of Andover as the Selectmen may determine. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 1 as 
printed in the warrant with the following amendment: 

Change paragraph 8 by inserting after the word "or", "Subject to the 
approval of Town Meeting" 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

Article 1 passed by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer of available 
funds and appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of developing 
bikeways in the Town, and further, to authorize the Town Manager to file an 
application for funds for purposes realting to the development of bikeways 
in a form and manner as may be required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and the United States Government and to contract for and expend such funds, 
provided, however, no more than $5,000.00 shall be expended until the Town 
receives approval of a seventy-five (75%) grant-in-aid from the federal or 
State government. Be it further provided that this Article shall be an 
amendment by substitution for Article 16 as adopted by the 1977 Annual Town 
Meeting. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town revoke its 
vote under Article 16 of the Warrant of the Annual Town Meeting of 1977 and 
substitute therefore the following: 

That the Town raise by transfer of available funds and appropriate the sum 
of $20,000.00 for the purpose of developing bikeways in the Town, and further, 
to authorize the Town Manager to file an application for funds for purposes 
relating to the development of bikeways in a form and manner as may be re- 
quired by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States Government 
and to contract for and expend such funds provided, however, no more than 
$5,000.00 shall be expended until the Town receives approval of a seventy- 
five (75%) grant-in-aid from the Federal or State Government. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

the Vote YES — 345 NO — 5 More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 3. To see what disposition shall be made of the unobligated balance 
of funds received by the Town pursuant to Title II of the Public Works Em- 
ployment Act of 1976 as amended. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen, 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the unobligated funds 
in the sum of $345.30, received pursuant to Title II of the Public Works Em- 
ployment Act of 1976 be transferred to Personal Services, Andover Police De- 
partment . 

Article 3 passed by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to trans- 
fer to the Andover Housing Authority a parcel of town-owned land located on 
the westerly side of the present Grandview Elderly Housing Project parking 
area, being 12,000 square feet in area more or less, and more particularly 
described as follows: 



108 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 

"Beginning at a point on the westerly side of land of the Andover 
Housing Authority, the line runs Southerly 200 feet along said land 
to a point; thence the line turns and runs Westerly 60 feet; thence 
the line turns and runs Northerly 200 feet to a point; thence the 
line turns and runs Easterly 60 feet to the point of beginning;" 

and to remove the restriction created in the conveyance, authorized by the 
vote at the Town Meeting of March 10, 1969 of 1.25 acres adjoining which 
was to be used for access, parking and snow removal and to grant the Auth- 
ority the right to use it for construction of apartments for elderly and 
handicapped. Or what the Town will do in regard to the same. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the 
Town authorize the Selectmen to transfer to the Andover Housing Authority 
a parcel of Town owned land located on the westerly side of the present 
Grandview Elderly Housing Project parking area, being 12,000 square feet 
in area, more or less, and more particularly described as follows: 

Beginning at a point on the westerly side of land of the Andover 
Housing Authority, the line runs southerly 200 feet along said land 
to a point; thence the line turns and runs Westerly 60 feet; thence 
the line turns and runs Northerly 200 feet to a point; thence the 
line turns and runs Easterly 60 feet to the point of beginning; 

that the Selectmen be further authorized to convey said property upon terms 
and conditions as they may determine and further authorize the Selectmen to 
do any act or acts necessary for the completion of said conveyance. 

A report of and Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 5 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from avail- 
able funds and appropriate the sum of $304,308.00 for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction, the Town to be reimbursed by the Commonwealth and the County 
as the law may permit; to authorize the Town to acquire the necessary 
drainage easements by gift, by purchase, or by seizure by right of eminent 
domain . 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 5 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $304,308.00 from 
available funds. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-Law 
as amended so as to change from Single Resident "A" and Industrial "G" to 
the General Business Zone, a tract of land with all the buildings thereon 
of the Trustees of Lebaron Realty Trust situated in said Andover, located 
at 186 North Main Street, being shown as Lot numbered Six on "Plan of land 
in Andover, Mass., as subdivided by J. P. Stevens & Co., Inc." Dated October 
1955, recorded in the North District of Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 
3356, and said lot is more particularly bounded and described as follows: 

Northerly and northeasterly by a curved line which is the line of 
Stevens Street, two hundred seventy-nine and fifty- two hundredths 
(279.52') feet; southerly by Lot No. 5 two hundred forty-three and 
thirty hundredths (243.30') feetjand westerly by land now or formerly 



109 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 

by J. P. Stevens & Co., Inc., forty-four and forty-three hundredths 
(44.43') feet; all as shown on said plan; containing thirteen thou- 
sand one hundred eighty (13,180) square feet more or less. 
Said parcel is shown as Lot #11 on Assessors Map 54 and is presently 
zoned Single Residence A in part and Industrial G in part. 

Such rezoning shall be subject to any restrictions on use as may be re- 
corded at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as provided for in 
Section VIII (C) of the Andover Zoning By-Law as amended. 

On petition of Irving M. Leoff and others. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Mary Myers. 

Article 6 was defeated. 

The Vote - less than the 2/3 required. 

(As Moderator James D. Doherty was taking a standing count of the 
vote, the Town Meeting was so obviously against passage that Gerald 
Lewis, attorney for the proponents conceded defeat and the Moderator 
so ruled . ) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to Amend Article XII, Miscellaneous 
By-Laws, by inserting the following as Section 26: 

Section 26. Depositing Leaves or other Refuse on Streets 

No person shall throw, scatter, drop or place or shall cause 
or procure to be thrown, scattered, dropped or placed in or 
upon any street, highway or other public place within the 
Town any leaves, refuse or other substances except in and 
upon areas and at such times as specifically designated by 
the Town Manager or his designee. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend 
Article XII, Miscellaneous By-Laws, by inserting the following as Section 26: 

Section 26. Depositing Leaves or other Refuse on Streets 

No person shall throw, scatter, drop or place or shall cause 
or procure to be thrown, scattered, dropped or placed in or 
upon any street, highway or other public place within the 
Town any leaves, refuse or other substances except in and 
upon areas and at such times as specifically designated by 
the Town Manager or his designee. 

Article 7 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer of available 
funds and appropriate the sum of $51,000.00 for the purpose of making en- 
ergy conserving repairs and improvements to various municipal buildings 
and schools and, further, to authorize the Town Manager to file an appli- 
cation for funds for pusposes relating in form and manner as may be re- 
quired by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States Govern- 
ment and to contract for and expend funds, provided however, that no funds 
in excess of $25,000.00 shall be expended until the Town receives approval 
for a grant-in-aid in the amount of $25,000.00 from either the Federal or 
State Agencies for the purpose of making such repairs or improvements. Be 
it further provided that this Article shall amend by substitution Article 
38 as adopted by the 1979 Annual Town Meeting. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 



110 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the 
Town revoke its vote under Article 38 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1979 
and substitute therefore the following: 

That the Town raise by transfer of available funds and appropriate 
the sum of $51,000.00 for the purpose of making energy conserving 
repairs and improvements to various Municipal Buildings and schools 
and, further, to authorize the Town Manager to file an application 
for funds for purposes relating in form and manner as may be required 
by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the United States Government 
and to contract for and expend funds, provided , however , that no funds 
in excess of $25,000.00 shall be expended until the Town receives 
approval for a Grant-in-aid in the amount of $25,000.00 from either 
the Federal or State Agencies for the purpose of making such repairs 
or improvements. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to Amend Section V.B.6a. , Motels 
and Hotels (Except in the Business District) of the Zoning By-Law as 
follows : 

Strike out the word "or" and substitute the word "nor". Accordingly 
the sentence shall read as follows: 

a. No building shall exceed two stories nor thirty feet in height. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the Planning Board. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend 
the Andover Zoning By-Law Section V.B.6a., Motels and Hotels (Except in 
the Business District) as follows: 

Strike out the word "or" and substitute the word "nor". Accordingly 
the sentence shall read as follows: 

a. No building shall exceed two stories nor thirty feet in height. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

the Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend its Zoning By-Law by 
striking out the words "two (2) Associate Members" and substituting there- 
fore the words "Four (4) Associate Members" as it appears under Section 
VIII. B. 1. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to Amend 
the Andover Zoning By-Laws by striking out the words "Two (2) Associate 
Members" and substituting therefore the words "Four (4) Associate Members" 
as it appears under Section VIII. B.l. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

the Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen and 
Town Manager to petition the Massachusetts Legislature for a Special Act 
to exempt from the provisions of the General Laws, Chapter 31, (Civil 
Service) all custodial positions within the Andover School Department. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the School Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Article 11 be 
approved as printed in the Warrant. 



Ill 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING OCTOBER 15, 1979 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law as 
follows : 

Amend Section VIII. A. by deleting item "1" in its entirety and substituting 
the following therefor: 

1. This By-Law shall be administered by a Zoning Administrator appointed 
by the Zoning Board of Appeals, subject to confirmation by the Board 
of Selectmen. The Zoning Administrator shall serve at the pleasure 
of the Board of Appeals, subject to such qualifications as may be 
established by the Board of Selectmen. The Board of Appeals may 
delegate some if its powers and duties to the Zoning Administrator 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 13. 
And further amend the Zoning By-Law sections listed below by deleting 
references to "Building Inspector" and "Inspector of Buildings"and sub- 
stituting "Zoning Administrator" therefor: 

VI.A.4.b 

VI.A.4.C. 

VI. C. 2 (line 21) 

VI. E. 1.2b (line 11) 

VI. E. 1.3. 

VI. J. 1. 

VI. J. 2. (b) 

VIII. A. 2. 

VIII. A. 4. 

VIII. A. 5. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 12 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-Law 
by revising Article II, Definitions, Item 10A- Lot Area, by deleting the num- 
ber "90%" and inserting in place thereof the number "20%". Or to take any 
vote or make any other action thereon. 

On petition of Douglas R. Mifflin and others. 

Article 13 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to accept the report prepared by 
the Cardinal Cushing Gym Study Committee as presented and as required by 
amendment to Article 27 as voted by the 1979 Annual Town Meeting. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 14 
as printed in the warrant. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will vote to repeal the requirements for an 
October Town Meeting by striking out Article II, Section 1A of the By-Laws 
of the Town of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town repeal the 
requirement for an October Town Meeting by striking out Article II, Section 
1A of the By-Laws of the Town of Andover. 

Article 15 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 



112 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15,1979 

ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name, 
Apple Blossom Road, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out 
by the Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled "Definitive Plan, Apple 
Blossom Road (located off Osgood Street), Owner Gates M. Poore , Engineer: 
Dana F. Perkins, Inc. of Reading, Mass. , Scale 1" = 40' , dated July 30, 1976" 
and said plan is recorded with the Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7554, 
Plan and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements 
on file with the Town Clerk. 

In petition of Dorothy N. Treanor and others. 

Article 16 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate a sum not to exceed $1,500.00 to pay unpaid bills for 
which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the Town 
transfer from available funds the sum of $1,287.70 to pay the following un- 
paid bills incurred in prior fiscal years: 

1. Perry Dean Stahl & Dept . of Community $ 967.01 

Rogers, Inc. Devel . & Planning 

2. Janet G. Gerraughty Finance Committee 200.20 

3. New England Telephone Dept. of Community 85.49 

Services 

4. Paul B. Williams, Inc. Central Services 35.00 

TOTAL $ 1,287.70 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 9/10 required 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-Law 
as follows: 

Amend Article IV. B. Table of Use Regulations by deleting item 17 in its 
entirety and substituting the following therefor: 

17. Restaurant SRA SRB SRC APT SC .OP GB IG IA ID 

a. an establishment where 
the principal activity 
is the service or sale 
of food or drink for 
consumption on pre- 
mises. N N N N BA N Y Y BA BA 

b. an establishment whose 
primary business is the 
sale of food or drink 
for consumption on or 
off premises which is 

1. primarily intended 
for immediate consump- 
tion rather than for 
use as an ingredient 
or component of meals; 
and 

2. available upon a 
short waiting time; 
and 



113 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 



SRA SRB SRC APT 
3. packaged or presented 

in such a manner that it 

can readily be consumed 

outside the premises where 

it is purchased. N N N N 

An establishment which 

provides service or 

sale of food or drink 

to customers while in 

their vehicles. N N N N 



SC OP GB IG IA ID 



BA BA 



Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town Amend the 
Andover Zoning By-Law as follows: 

Amend Article IV. B. Table of Use Regulations by deleting item 17 in its 
entirety and substituting the following therefor: 



17. Restaurant 



SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB IG IA ID 



an establishment where 
the principal activity 
is the service or sale 
of food or drink for 
consumption on pre- 
mises. N N N 

an establishment whose 
primary business is the 
sale of food or drink 
for consumption on or 
off premises which is 

1. primarily intended 
for immediate consump- 
tion rather than for 
use as an ingredient 
or component of meals; 
and 

2. available upon a 
short waiting time; 
and 

3. packaged or presented 
in such a manner that it 
can readily be consumed 
outside the premises where 
it is purchased. N 

an establishment which 
provides service or 
sale of food or drink 
to customers while in 
their vehicles. N 



BA 



BA BA 



N 



BA 



N 



N 



N 



N 



N 



X 



BA N 



N N 



A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 
The Vote YES — 282 NO — 1 More than the 2/3 required. 



114 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING, OCTOBER 15, 1979 

ARTICLE 19. That the Town of Andover convey to Michael L. Lopez and 
Elizabeth Ann Lopez a 5' strip of land containing 1,070 square feet, said 
strip running along South Main Street a distance of 343.80' in front of 
land owned by Michael L. Lopez and Elizabeth Ann Lopez and denying them 
legal frontage on South Main Street. This strip was owned by the Bay State 
Street Railway Company and was taken by the Town of Andover over by tax 
taking August 26, 1969. Said strip being lot 1A of the Town of Andover 
Assessors' Map 83. 

On petition of Dean Ward and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 19 as printed in the warrant upon terms and conditions that which 
the Selectmen may impose. 

A Report of the Andover Planning Board was read by David Erickson. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II of the By-Laws 
by adding Section 9 as follows: 

The failure of the Finance Committee to prepare and mail its report 
as required in Article III, Section 3 (a) of the By-Laws and the 
failure of the Town Manager to complete his budget by the time stated 
in Article IV, Section 6 of the By-Laws shall not invalidate action 
taken at a Town Meeting. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article II of 
the By-Laws by adding Section 9 as follows: 

The failure of the Finance Committee to prepare and mail its report 
as required in Article III, Section 3 (a) of the By-Laws and the 
failure of the Town Manager to complete his budget by the time stated 
in Article IV, Section 6 of the By-Laws shall not invalidate action 
taken at a Town Meeting. 

Article 20 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to dissolve the October Special Town Meeting of 1979 at 10:05 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST: 



Elden R. Salter, CMC 
Town Clerk 



115 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN DECEMBER 31, 1979 



State Equalized Valuation 

Borrowing Capacity 5% 

Town Debt as of December 31, 1979 



$14,080,000.00 



$507, 100,000.00 
25,355,000.00 



LESS DEBT OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT : 

1963-Accelera ted Sewer 
1966-New Senior High School 
1966-Fish Brook 
1967-Water Mains 
1967-Bancrof t School 
1967-High School Additional 
1968-West Elem. Additional 
1968-Water Mains 
1970-Water Mains 
1971-Water Treatment Plant 
1973-Shawsheen-Doherty Addition 
1975-Sewers 
1976-Water Reservoir 
1977-Water Mains 
1978-Water Mains 
1979-Water Mains 



TOWN DEBT INSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 

1966-Municipal Buildings 

1967-Public Safety Center 

1968-Sewers 

1968-Land Acquisition 

1970-Sewers 

1970-Public Safety Center 

1975-Water Plans 

1976-Conservation Land 

1979-Sewers 

1979-School Plans 

1979-Bancrof t Roof 



$ 


160 


000 


00 


1 


,170 


000 


.00 




240 


000 


00 




120 


000 


00 




660 


000 


00 




315 


000 


00 




990 


000 


00 




45 


000 


00 




15 


000 


00 


1 


,365 


000 


00 




385 


000 


00 


1 


,840 


000 


00 




725 


000 


00 




90 


000 


00 




70 


000 


00 


2 


,185 


000 


00 



$ 210,000.00 

330,000.00 

205,000.00 

80,000.00 

20,000.00 

10,000.00 

30,000.00 

645,000.00 

1,270,000.00 

720,000.00 

185,000.00 



$10,375,000.00 



3,705,000.00 



Borrowing Capacity December 31, 1979 $21,650,000.00 
Hewlett Packard Interest Free Loan Balance Due $288,776.70 



116 



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117 



Town of Andover 
Revenue 

For the Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30. 1979 

Receipts Included in Assessors' Estimates 



Local Aid and Agency Funds: 

Elderly Exemption Ch 967 1977 

Veterans Benefits 

Loss of Taxes - State Property 

Widows 

Blind Persons Exemption 

School Transportation 

Construction of School Projects 

School Lunch Program 

Regional Public Libraries 

Free Public Libraries 

Special Education Programs 

School Aid 

Highway Ch 497 

Highway Construction and 

Maintenance 
Lottery 



22,932.97 

6,837.20 

58,954.81 

700.00 

1,137.50 

167,443.00 

257,292.50 

222,293.53 

74,079.86 

9,768 8 75 

28,350.00 

1,597,505.00 

117,494.00 

161,422.00 
281,026.86 



3,007,237,98 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes: 

Current Year 1,220,526.36 

Previous Years 326, 739.85 



1,547,266.21 



Licenses : 
Dog Fees 
Liquor 
Marriage 
Miscellaneous 

Fines 



2,618.85 

19,450.00 

756.00 

9,447.75 



32,272.60 
49,672.67 



Special Assessments: 

Apportioned Sewer Paid in Advance 22,180.01 

Apportioned Sewer Added to Taxes : 

Current Year 19,368.06 

Previous Years 329.70 

Apportioned Water Paid in Advance 11,598.94 

Apportioned Water Added tobTaxes : 

Current Year 1,708.56 

Unapportioned Street Assessments 5,405.00 



60,590.27 



118 



Town of Andover 
Revenue 

For the Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30, 1979 

Receipts Included in Assessors' Estimates (cont.) 



General Government: 
Rent of Town Property 
Planning Board 
Miscellaneous 

Protection of Persons and Property 
Ambulance Fees 
Building Inspection 
Electrical Inspection 
Gas Inspection 
Miscellaneous 

Health and Sanitation: 
Plumbing Inspection 
Sewer Installations 
Miscellaneous 

Highways : 

Supervision of Tree Trimming 

Veterans Services : 
Reimbursements : 
Individual 
State 

School : 

Summer School Tuition 
Other Tuition 
Rentals and Other 

Recreation : 

Self-supporting Programs 

Concessions 

Council on Aging 



4.330.50 
10,466.00 
21,422.75 



5.363.00 

146,287.40 

18,350.25 

523.00 

6,757.94 



6,262.00 

375.00 

12.190.60 



36.219.25 



10.285.27 
17,253.05 



4.205.00 
1.908.74 
3.145.94 



61.135.92 
2.177.60 
8.997.68 



177,281.59 



18,827.60 



1.140.00 



27.538.32 



9,259.68 



72.311.20 



119 



Town of Andover 
Revenue 

For the Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30, 1979 






RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS" ESTIMATES 



(cont . ) 



Public Service Enterprises 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Liens Added to Taxes : 

Current Year 

Previous Years 

Cemeteries : 
Care of Lots 
Foundations 
Tombs and Interments 

Libraries : 

Fines and Sales 



1,033.798.02 
23.706.08 

25.734.39 
811.38 



314.00 
2.578.00 
9,180.00 



1.084.049.87 



12.072.00 



8.168.09 



Interest : 
Committed 
Cash Investments 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Taxes and assessments 
Tax Titles 
Water and Sewer Charges 

Farm Animal Excise Taxes: 
Current Year 



7,121.45 
358.193.54 
1,624.62 
30,904.26 
2,680.25 
1.097.91 



441.50 



401,622.03 



441.50 



Andover Housing Authority 
Lieu of Taxes 



2,016.00 



2.016.00 



6.554,824.06 



120 






Town of Andover 
Revenue 
For the Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30. 1979 
Receipts Not Included in Assessors' Estimates 



Tax Title Redemptions 7.691.01 

Tax Title Costs 455.25 

Dog Funds - Care and Custody 4.308.46 

Insurance Claims 51,582.58 
Refunds : 

Departmental 7.441.84 

Miscellaneous 14,216.32 

Sale of Equipment 2.210.87 
Recycling : 

Paper 5.849.28 

Glass 2,995.02 

State - Dept. of Public Safety 48.00 

Insurance Dividend 234.96 

State - Health Dept. 962.80 

State - Arts & Humanities 400.00 

Mass Historical Commission 2,500.00 

Christ Church Lunch Program 565.01 



101.461.40 



121 



1 



Town of Andover 
Revenue 

For the Fiscal Year Ending 
June 30, 1979 
Agency and Revenue Accounts 
Personal Property Taxes: 

Current Year 674,178.84 

Previous Years 146.60 674,325.44 

Real Estate Taxes: 

Current Year 15,595,601.74 

Previous Years 91,056.79 15,690,843.93 

Dog Licenses from County 

Dog Licenses to County 5,658.05 

Off Street Parking Meters 2,144.33 

Sale of Dogs 96.00 

School Lunch Program 343,865.77 

Andover Athletic Program 14,310.09 

Cemetery Sale of Lots 4,952.00 

Cemetery Perpetual Cares 8,333.00 

Interest : 

Spring Grove Cemetery Funds 18,396.11 

Trust and Investment Funds 9,090.00 

Flower Funds 1,637.00 29,123.11 

Municipal Debt: 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 925,000.00 

Non-Revenue Cash Investments 3, 150, 068 <, 29 

Revenue Cash Investments 25,111,841.65 

Payroll Deductions: 

Blue Cross and Blue Shield 302,795.13 

Group Life Insurance 7,763.91 

Group Life Insurance - Optional 14,976.73 

U S Savings Bonds 17,141.25 

United Fund 6,952.93 

Withholding Taxes - Federal 2,161,659.41 

Withholding Taxes - State 582,610.76 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 47.00 

Tailings 291,22 



122 



Town of Andover 
Revenue 

For the Fiscal Year ending 
June 30, 1979 

Agency and Revenue Accounts 



School Aid: 

P L 94-405 

Sex Equity Program 

Project 79-009-505-1612 

Project 003341 

Ed Lib Learning Resources 

Project 79-009-595-0272 

Project 300-770-280 

Project 300-780-422 

Project 78-009-103 

Project 79-009-01N 

Project 79-042N 

Project Oral History #0H 1 

Individual Reading 

P L 874 
State Grant - Elderly Affairs 
Library - Title I Grant 
Title VI - Ceta Program 
Police - Miscellaneous 
Police - Off duty work details 
Police - Legal Advisor 
Sale of Trash Bags 
Meals Tax 
Tax Title Escrow 
Federal Revenue Sharing: 

Grants 

Investments 

Investment Income 
Federal Anti-Recession Funds: 

Grants 

Investments 

Investment Income 
Sewer Charges 
Sewer Liens Added to Taxes 





900. 


00 


1 


781 


00 


1 


584. 


00 


12 


300. 


00 


14 


420 


95 


4 


956. 


00 


12 


149. 


04 


29 


119 


49 


36 


340 


00 


55 


290. 


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24 


500 


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5 


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8 


200 


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77 


803 


23 


33 


750 


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13 


680 


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26 


450 


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5 


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00 


97 


341 


40 


7 


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37 


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066 


76 


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446 


512 


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58 


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59 


337 


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2 


330 


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389 


958 


.54 


10 


662 


36 



51,164.085.54 



GROUP I 
GROUP II 
GROUP III 



6,554,824.06 

101,461.40 

51, 164,085.54 

57,820,371.00 



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26. OS 

14.. 59 

43 

6S.46 


ao o 
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into an to ih en 

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Year Ending June 30, 1979 



Employees' Payroll Deductions: 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

United Fund 

U. S. Savings Bonds 
School Aid: 

Project 790-009-595-0272 

Board of Education Project 003341 

Project Oral History OH 1 

P. L. 94 Project 149-2 

Fed Project 300-780-422 

Distributive Ed Project 054-2 

Project 79-009-505-161-2 

Project 79-042N 

Project 79-009-103 

Project 79-009-001N 

Project OM-301-ID & OM-302-HU 

Project 78-009-103 

Project 300-770-280 

Project 78-009-75N 

Title III-Misc Projects 

Title VIB E S E A FY 1977 

Title VIB E S E A FY 78 

P. L. 874 
Petty Cash Advances 
Title II Ceta Project 
Anti-Recession Funds 
State and County Assessments: 

County Tax 

State Parks and Reservations 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 

Examination of Retirement System 

Ipswich River Watershed District 

Air Pollution Control 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 

Group Insurance - Elderly 

Group Insurance - Retired Teachers 

Merrimack Valley RTA 
Refunds : 

Real Estate Taxes 

Personal Property Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Water Rates and Services 

Sewer Charges 

Miscellaneous 



2,264, 


725 


47 


461, 


485 


56 


297, 


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33 


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322 


24 


69 


261 


63 


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10 


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7 


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135 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 
Year Ending June 30, 1979 (cont.) 



Off Duty Work Details: 

Police 98,652.84 

Fire 718.00 

School 1,632.50 

Police Legal Advisor 13,157.48 

Trust Funds 8,518.72 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 11,480.20 

Purchase of Trash Bags 40,584.23 

Dog Licenses to County 5,727.65 

Sale of Dogs 66.00 

Walter Raymond Fund 391.40 

Lucy Shaw Fund 119.65 

Library - Fed Project L S C A 13,238.36 
Revenue Cash Investments 27,578,431.29 

Non-Revenue Cash Investments 2,850,000.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Cash Investments 614,539.46 

Insurance Claim Recoveries 2,561.95 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 183,706.55 

Other Expenses 317,598.36 

Andover Athletic Program 14,856.37 

Miscellaneous 602.89 

Tailings 7.70 

Retirement System 416,334.00 

Non- Contributory . Pensions 61 , 715 .43 

Meals Tax 1,289.99 

Haven Renovation Project 38,604.95 

Transfer - Police Escrow Account 5,005.00 

Insurance Fund 5,350.00 

Ceta Funds Transfer 10,200.00 



36,487,737.08 



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139 



TRANSFERS FROM COMPENSATION PLAN ACCOUNT 
Year Ending June 30, 1979 



Town Manager 


$ 4 


048 


00 


Elections and Registration 




390 


00 


Finance Committee 




45. 


00 


Town Accountant 


3 


104 


00 


Col lee tor -Treasurer 


3 


476. 


00 


Assessors 


2 


645 


00 


Central Purchasing 


1 


313 


00 


Town Clerk 


1 


440 


00 


Planning Board 




518 


00 


Municipal Buildings 


1 


568 


00 


Central Services 




107 


00 


Council on Aging 


1 


059 


00 


Police 


67 


343 


00 


Fire 


49 


446 


00 


Animal Control 




716 


00 


Community Development 


8 


893 


00 


Highway 


14 


401 


00 


Public Works Administration 


2 


754 


00 


Park 


4 


442 


00 


Forestry 


4 


371 


00 


Vehicle Maintenance 


2 


093 


00 


Engineering 


2 


215 


00 


Sewer 


2 


240 


00 


Solid Waste 




605 


00 


Veterans Services 


1 


168 


00 


Library 


19 


543 


00 


Recreation 


5 


383 


00 


Water 


12 


837 


00 


Cemetery 


2 


811 


00 




220 


974 


00 



140 





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144 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1979 



Net Funded and 
Fixed Debt 10,900,000.00 



Article 1, 1963-Sewer APW 46G 
Article 8, 1964-High School 1 
Article 6, 1965-Fish Brook 
Article 11, 1965-Municipal 

Buildings 
Article 1, 1967-Bancrof t 

School 
Article 1, 1966 and Article 3, 

1967-High School 
Article 13, 1967-Water 

System Projects 
Article 16, 1967-Municipal 

Buildings 
Article 8B, 1968 and Article 17, 
1968-West and Bancroft 1 
Article 10, 1967-Land 

Acquisi tion 
Article 4A , 1967 and Article 32, 

1968-Water Projects 
Article 4B, 1967 and Article 16, 

1968-Sewer Projects 
Article 19A and 3B, 1969- 

Sewer Project Lowell & 

Summer Streets 
Article 5, 1968 and Article 2B, 

1969-Water Project 

Lowell Street 
Article 14, 1969-Municipal 

Buildings 
Article 26, 1970-Water 

Treatment Plant 1 

Article 15, 1973-Shawsheen & 

Doherty School Renovations 
Article 48, 1974-Land 

Acquisition 
Article 17, 1973-Sewer 

West Andover 1 

Article 10A , 1975-Plans 

Water Distribution 
Article 8, 1976-Water 

Reservoir & Mains 
Article 47, 1976-Land 

Acquisition 
Article 14, 1975-Water 

Mains 
Article 9, 1977-Water 

Mains 



200 

,170 

240 

330 

755 

360 

180 

240 

,100 

90 

55 

235 

40 

35 

20 

,560 

485 

60 
,960 

60 
775 
690 

70 



000.00 
000.00 
000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 

000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 
000.00 



190,000.00 



10,900,000.00 



10,900,000.00 



145 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1979 






Apportioned Sewer Assessments 
Not Due 97,857.79 



Apportioned Water Assessments 
Not Due 18,804.93 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 

9,653.03 

Suspended Water Assessments 

2,341.66 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Revenue Due in 1979 

to 1995 Inclusive 97,857.79 

Apportioned Water Assessments 

Revenue Due in 1979 

to 1996 Inclusive 18,804.93 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

9,653.03 

Suspended Water Assessments 

2,341.66 



128,657.41 



128,657.41 



146 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

December 31, 1979 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1979 $ 16,244,58 

Receipts : 

Payroll Deductions $ 281,734.59 

Make-up Payments 6,151.89 
Pension Reimbursements from 

Other Systems 2,498.00 

Appropriations 505,339.00 

Investment Income 224,609.34 

Sale of Investments 63,861.42 1,084,194.24 



Disbursements 

Administrative Expense: 

Salaries 12,404.50 

Other Expenses 858.02 

Refunds of Accumulated 

Deposits 73,506.72 

Annuities Paid 60,771.81 

Pensions Paid 544,097.55 

Purchase of Securities 293,064.94 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 960.07 

Pension Reimbursements to 

Other Systems 2,830.98 

Transfer of Accounts to 

Other Systems 25,723.13 1,014,217.72 



Cash Balance, December 31, 1979 $ 86,221.10 



147 



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151 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 



ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Edward M. Harris, Chairman - 1980 
Susan T. Poore, Secretary - 1982 
James Abramson - 1981 
Norma A. Gammon - 1982 
Lawrence J. Sullivan - 1980 

TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty - 1980 



TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 

Charles F. Dalton, Chairman 
Alcide J. LeGendre - 1982 
John M. Murray - 1981 



- 1980 



TRUSTEES, PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

William V. Emmons - 1982 
Earl G. Efinger - 1982 
Rev. Westy Egmont 
Joan M. Lewis - 1982 
Rev. Otis W. Maxfield 
John R. Petty - 1982 
Margaret R. Porter - 1982 
Rev. J. Edison Pike 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Donn B. Byrne, Chairman - 1980 
Jordan J. Burgess - 1981 
Timothy D. Driscoll - 1981 
Ruth T. Dunbar - 1982 
Donald K. Ellsworth - 1982 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald - 1980 
Joanne F. Marden - 1982 
Robert L. Merrill - 1980 
John J. Sullivan - 1981 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Archibald D. Maclaren, Chairman 
William H. Russell 

BOARD OF RETIREMENT 

David L. Nicoll, Chairman 
Wendell A. Mattheson, Secretary 
Leo F. Daley 

TOWLE FUND TRUST 

Marilyn R. Brodie 
Philip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Westcott 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Elaine F. Viehmann - Chairman - 1981 
Alan W. Doerr - 1980 
John S. Eaton - 1982 
Joseph A. Finn - 1982 
Donald W. Robb - 1980 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Winston A. Blake, Chairman - 1983 
Thomas P. Eldred - 1981 
Mary Jane Powell* 
Richard A. Savrann - 1980 
Thomas R. Wallace - 1984 

*Appointed by Commissioner of Depai 

ment of Community Affairs (State) 

June 24, 1981 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

James A. Booth, Andover - 1982 

John P. Ford, Lawrence 

Patrick McCarthy, Lawrence 

Joseph F. Sweeney, Lawrence 

Terrence Breen, Methuen 

John W. Regan, Methuen 

John F. Caffrey, III, North Andover 



APPOINTIVE 



Robert E. McQuade 



MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 

George S. Moran 
Paul V. Teplitz 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Albert F. Cullen, Jr., Chairman 

Jane E. Griswold 

Ernest N. Hall 

Richard H. Moody 

Wesley E. Whitney 

Associate Members: 

Robert Levinson 

Carol C. McDonough 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Chairman 
Dr. James P. Kartell 
Joseph P. Madden 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

Clarence Johnson (American Legion) 
John J. Lewis (Veterans' Service Agent 
Joseph L. Monan (V.F.W. 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Virginia H. Cole 
Philip A. Dargie 
Joseph Walsh 
Elden R. Salter 






152 



ISTEES, MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 



•nelia 


W. LeMaitre, Chairman 


>ert G. 


Butler 


ricia 


D. Dye 


/ard I . 


Erickson (Emeritus) 


;eph A . 


Glasser 


•ta B. 


Hornidge 


in W. Kimball 


:hard C. MacGowan 


ISERVATION COMMISSION 


>ert A. 


Pustell, Chairman 


•ranee 


L. Campbell 


les O'Day 


Edward W. Lenoe 


.en T. 


Marcus 


liel Pi 


ngree 


laid F. 


Shepard 


1MUNITY SERVICES COMMITTEE 



irles C. Rancourt, Chairman 

rce Andrews 

ineth DeBenedictis 

iglas F. Mitchell 

jmas Powers 

in Rosenblatt 

laid Thorpe, Jr. 

STORICAL COMMISSION 



Llip K. Allen Chairman 
inley Butcher 
vrence Gross 
inklin K. Haggerty 
in D. Lewis 
rsha E. Rooney 
rgaret H. Thompson 

WMUTER RAIL STUDY COMMITTEE 



George Kachen, Chairman 
son S . Cohen 

Randolph W. Lehman-Becker 
ayer S. Warshaw 
bert S. Zollner 

ITTEE ON TOWN TRUST FUNDS 



bert M. Foster 
drew F. Shea 
ron H. Muise 

AFFIC COMMITTEE 



wn Engineer John Avery 

wn Manager Jared S. A. Clark 

ancis C. Emmons, Jr. 

lice Chief David L. Nicoll 

ancis J. Trombly 

CHITECTURAL BARRIERS STUDY COMMITTEE 



ndra Chateauneauf 

an Kennan 

bert E. McQuade 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Dr. Lawrence Spiegel, Chairman 
George J. Fantini, Jr. 
Robert Finlayson 
S. Joseph Hoffman 
Dorothy Sherrerd 
Dr. Thomas J. Swift 
Susan C. Tucker 
George Ziady 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Thomas Powers, Chairman 
James A. Booth 
Florence McGrath 
Don P. Scott 
Isabella Hurst 
John B. McAllister 
Joseph W. Odium 

COMPUTER ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

George Orfanedes, Chairman 

John Baker 

Jordan J. Burgess 

Albert DelCheccolo 

David Dickey 

Sharin Luti 

Harry McCormick 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Jared S. A. Clark 
George Fantini 
Robert Finlayson 
Dorothy Sherrerd 
George Ziady 

PLANNING BOARD 

Mary J. Meyers, Chairman 
Patricia G. Curtin 
Francis J. McBride 
Paul Teplitz 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Reginald L. Marden, Chairman 
James Caldwell 
John F. Sweeney 

DESIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Dennis R. St. John Chairman 

Anthony S. DiDio 

Rachel Garcia 

Bruce Moody 

G. Warren Patterson 

SOLID WASTE STUDY COMMITTEE 

Jared S. A. Clark 
Beverly Faust 
Reginald Marden 
Robert E. McQuade 
Thomas Stark 

Resource Members : 
Clark Lewis 
John J. Lewis 



153 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Gropper , Chairman 
Robert B. Mclntyre 
Virginia H. Cole 
Paul R. Curley 
Francis J. Hill 
Richard E. Landry 
William A. Munroe 
Renee Pruneau 
Donald S. Robb 



Alternates 

William Eaton 
Beth Haskell 



Resource Bank 

Sandra N. Chateauneuf 

Mark DeLisio 

John Doyle 

Alfred E. Hart 

Howard McKew 

Lewis Stella, Jr. 



**:4c*****;f#* 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



Paul E. Tsongas, 2003F, JFK Federal Bldg., Boston 
Edward M. Kennedy, 1702 P.O. Bldg., Boston 



SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 



William X. Wall, 179 Spruce Street, Lawrence 



FIRST ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 6, 7, and 8 



Robert C. Buell, Rm 516, State House, Boston 



SEVENTEENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 



Gerald M. Cohen, 5 William Street, Andover 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



James M. Shannon, 11 Lawrence Street, Lawrence 



FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 



John F. Markey , 246 Turnpike Road, North Andover 



154 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1979 



nimal Inspector Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M. 

ssessor William H. Russell 

ivil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

ollector-Treasurer Myron H. Muise 

irector, Memorial Hall Library Nancy C. Jacobson 

irector of Community Development and Planning. . . .Rhys G. Kear 

irector of Community Services Joan S. Pearson 

irector of Finance and Budget Anthony J. Torrisi 

irector of Public Health (Acting) Edward L. Tyler, Jr. 

irector of Public Works Robert E. McQuade 

og Officer Donald V. Porter 

ire Chief William T. Downs 

orestry Superintendent James L. Bamford 

ame Warden Forrest H. Noyes , Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden James V. Deyermond 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A. Zalla, Jr. 

eneral Construction Inspector James J. Rand, Jr. 

ighway Superintendent Robert T. Volker 

ousing Authority Executive Director Thomas P. Walsh 

nspector of Buildings William Meins 

Local Building Inspector Sam J. DeSalvo 

Asst. Local Building Inspector David W. Pattullo 

nspector of Wires Kenneth Smigliani 

Asst. Inspector of Wires Gilbert DeMoor 

lumbing, Gas and Sewer Inspector Harold A. Rutter, Jr. 

olice Chief (Acting) James F. Johnson 

urchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

ealer of Weights and Measures Charles P. Howe 

uperintendent of Schools Dr. Kenneth R. Seifert 

uperintendent of Spring Grove Cemetery Stephan J. Bamford 

own Accountant Wendell A. Mattheson 

own Clerk Elden R. Salter 

Asst. Town Clerk Olga Palenski 

own Counsel Alfred L. Daniels 

Asst. Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien 

own Engineer John Avery 

own Manager Jared S. A. Clark 

own Constables Thomas P. Eldred and Willard 

M. Walsh 

eterans ' Service Agent John J. Lewis 

ater and Sewer Superintendent Ernest J. Cote 



155 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection 42 

Assessors 12 

AVIS 26 

Board of Selectmen 4 

CETA Program 19 

Central Purchasing 20 

Civil Defense 19 

Collector /Treasurer 11 

Community Development & Planning 42 

Planning Board 43 

Board of Health 43 

Zoning Board of Appeals 46 

Conservation Commission 47 

Building Inspection 48 

Electrical Inspection 50 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection 50 

Inspection Services 51 

Community Services 37 

Council on Aging 39 

Directory of Department Heads 155 

Directory of Town Officials 152 

Dog Officer 22 

Finance & Budget 7 

Financial Statements 116 

Fire Department 16 

Greater Lawrence Mental Health 

Center 23 



Greater Lawrence Outreach, Inc 4 

Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational 
Technical High School 

Greater Lawrence Sanitary District.. 8 

Historical Commission 2 

Housing Authority 2 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund % 

Jury List 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 

Memorial Hall Library 2 

Police Department 1 

Public Works 3 

Engineering 5 

Water 5 

Sewers 5 

Highways 5 

Vehicle Maintenance 5 

Parks 5 

Forestry 5 

Spring Grove Cemetery 5 

Town Clerk. 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager I 

Town Meeting Minutes 51 

Trustees Punchard Free School lj 

Veterans ' Services 23 

Weights & Measures 5J 



1980 



^sasss*^*, 




TOWN 
OF 



VNNUAL 
REPORT 



Annual 
Report 
for the 
Town of 
Andover 



1980 



(January 1, 1980 through 



December 31, 1980) 



Prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 

Chapter 40, Section 49 

of the General Laws of the 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

and Article II, Section Four 

of the By-Laws of the 

Town of Andover 




Board of Selectmen 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
01810 



March 15, 1981 



Fellow Citizens of Andover: 

The year 1980 was another big one for your town government. 
However, this year we were spared the problems arising from such 
natural phenomena as blizzards and floods. 

Some changes in the Board of Selectmen took place as a 
result of the annual election on March 24, 1980. Selectman 
Edward M. Harris was re-elected for another three-year term and 
Gerald H. Silverman, a former School Committeeman, was elected 
for a three-year term, Selectman Lawrence J. Sullivan having 
declined to stand for re-election. Selectman James L. Abramson 
was elected Chairman of the Board; Norma A. Gammon, 
Vice-chairman; and Susan T. Poore, Secretary, for the coming 
year. 

The operations of the town government continued to be under 
the direction of Town Manager Jared S. A. Clark, who completed 
his second year in this capacity. He continued to be faced with 
the ceiling of increases in municipal expenditures of 4% over 
those for 1979 as established by the State Legislature. As this 
was the second year under the 4% ceiling, there was no delay in 
convening the Annual Town Meeting which was held commencing on 
Monday, April 14, 1980, again at the Case Memorial Cage of 
Phillips Academy, thanks to the public spirit of that 
institution and the continued unsafe condition of the Memorial 
Auditorium of the East Junior High School. The third session of 
the Annual Town Meeting was held at the West Junior High School 
on Shawsheen Road. 

The continuing deteriorating economic condition of the 
country, imbalance of budgets, adverse balance of payments, the 
resulting inflation and other factors led to the development by 
a private group of legislation (1) to limit property taxes to 2 
1/2% of full market value and to limit each subsequent year's 
tax levy to no more than 2 1/2% of the previous year's levy; (2) 
to reduce motor vehicle excise taxes from $66 to $25 per 
thousand; (3) to eliminate local and regional school department 
fiscal autonomy; (4) to eliminate binding arbitration in union 
negotiations, and (5) to place a cap on increases in regional, 
county and state assessments on municipalities of 4% of the 
prior year's assessment. 



This legislation was passed with a large plurality at the 
General Election on November 4, 1980. This legislation has 
introduced a number of problems for the town government in the 
preparation of the 1982 budget and will probably have a greater 
effect when it comes to preparing that for 1983. However, 
Andover finds itself in a sufficiently good situation as not to 
have to cut back its services to the same degree as a number of 
other municipalities in the Commonwealth. In addition, its 
bonding credit remains at Aa . 

The sections of this report which follow present a brief 
summary of the major problems dealt with by the various elements 
of the town government. 

The Board of Selectmen wishes to reiterate the importance 
it attaches to the work of the volunteer boards and committees 
of the town government. Much of the work done reflects the views 
of these groups. Again, we wish to call attention of persons 
having the public interest at heart, as well as qualifications 
useful to these groups to come forward and enroll in the Town 
Talent Bank at the Town Hall (Town Manager's office). There are 
never enough of these volunteers. 

James L. Abramson, Chairman 
Norma A. Gammon, Vice-chairman 
Susan T. Poore, Secretary 
Edward M. Harris 
Gerald H. Silverman 



Board of Selectmen 



The Board of Selectmen began the year holding four meetings each month, 
alternate meetings being Conference Sessions. However, with the town election 
of March 24, 1983, the new Board decided to reduce the number of meetings to 
three, the first meeting of each month to be a Conference Session, the two 
others to be Regular Meetings. As time went on it became the practice to hold 
a Special Meeting, the last part of which was used as a Conference Session. 
The Board met forty-three times during the year in twenty Regular Meetings, 
twenty-one Special Meetings and two Conference Sessions. As is usual, some of 
these meetings involved the functions of the Board as Sewer Commissioners or 
Water Commissioners, freguently as the Town Licensing Board. A number were 
held with such other Town boards and committees as the Planning Board and the 
Conservation Commission when matters involving these organizations were under 
consideration. 

At the Town Election on March 24, 1990, Selectman Edward M. Harris was 
re-elected to a three-year term and Gerald H. Silverman was elected, also to 
a three-year term. Selectman James Abramson was was elected Chairman; 
Selectman Norma Gammon, Vice-chairman; and Selectman Poor, Secretary for the 
ensuing year. 

During the year, the Selectmen approved several Industrial Development 
Financing Bond issues under the terms of G. L. Chapter 43D without pledging 
the full faith and credit of the Town. These were as follows: 

(1) On January 7, 1933, the acquisition by Wang Laboratories of 85 acres on 
River Road and construction of a 233 ,333 square foot facility thereon in 
the amount of $13,333,033. Because of the proven unsuitability of the land 
this application was withdrawn by Wang, and at the meeting of April 28, 
1983, a new application for purchase of 133 acres along Route 1-93 further 
south for the same size facility and for the same amount was approved by 
the Selectmen. 

(2) On February 26, 1983, the Board approved an application by Intertel, 
Inc., for $4,333,033 to purchase a 26 acre parcel in the Andover Technical 
Center and build an 32,533 square foot building. 

(3) On March 3, 1933, the Board approved the issuance of $533,033 
additional Industrial Revenue Bonds for Cressey, Dockham & Co., Inc., as 
supplementary to a project revised and approved as revised by the Board for 
the issuance of $2,753,033 in bonds for this concern. 

(4) On September 2, 1983, the Board considered and approved an application 
from Dyonics, Inc., for $3,533,033 to purchase approximately 23 acres of 
land on Dascomb Road and construct, renovate and equip a 63,333 square foot 
facility, the property having been previously occupied. 

(5) At the meeting of September 22, 1983, the Board approved an application 
from Physical Sciences, Inc., for $1,433,033 to purchase approximately 5 
acres of land on Frontage Road and build a 24,000 square foot or larger 
building thereon. 

A Cable Television Advisory Committee having been appointed, the Board 
on January 7, 1983, set May 28, 1983, as the date by which all proposals from 
cable television companies to service the town in accordance with the request 
for proposals circulated by the Town of Andover were to be received. 

Because of problems arising in preparation of the FY81 Town Budget and 
Warrant resulting from the Governor's placing of a ceiling of 4% on municipal 
budgets, the Board at the request of the Town Manager set the date for the 






annual Town Meeting back to Monday, April 14, 1983, at its meeting of January 
7, 198.3. 

At its meeting on January 14, 1983, the Board adopted a Fair Housing 
Policy, under the terms of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 and the Housing and 
Community Development Act of 1974. At the same meeting the Board adopted an 
Equal Opportunity Employment Policy under the terms of the of Civil Rights 
Act of 1964, the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972, Presidential 
Executive Order 11246 and the State Governor's Executive Order 74, all as 
amended . 

The Essex County Advisory Board met on January 26, 1980, at the City 
Hall in Peabody to review the County budget as prepared by the Commissioners. 
Selectman Harris as Chairman represented the Andover Board of Selectmen. 

In accordance with his contract, the performance of his duties by Mr. 
Jared S. A. Clark, the Town Manager, was evaluated by the Board of Selectmen 
on February 16, 1980. As was the case the previous year, the Board recorded 
itself as very satisfied with that performance. 

An Administrative Policy for the Sewer System of the Town of Andover was 
adopted by the Board on March 19, 1980, in furtherance of the implementation 
of the Master Sewer Plan, dated December 20, 1957, as revised and adopted by 
vote of the 1978 Annual Town Meeting in Article 39 of the Warrant, and as 
adopted for the record by the Board of Sewer Commissioners on March 3, 1980. 

The Board agreed to support the placement of a monument on town land at 
the corner of the Bowling Green in Shawsheen Village nearest to the 
intersection of Routes 28 and 133 commemorating the model community 
established by Mr. William Wood, founder of the American Woolen Company, 
which has now been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. This 
request was made through its President, Mr. Philip Salamone, by the Shawsheen 
Neighborhood Association to the Selectmen at their meeting on April 7, 1930. 

At the same meeting, the Board refused to support a proposed bylaw 
submitted by a private group to govern the transportation of nuclear waste 
through the town. 

Because of the expected outbreak of gypsy moths in Andover, a public 
hearing was held at the Selectmen's meeting of April 28, 1980, at which time 
the Director of Public Works recommended the use of the bacterial insecticide 
Bt, but only for trees in danger of dying and for Andover' s roadside trees. 
Both the Conservation Commission and the Audubon Society were said to be 
opposed to the spraying. 

At the same meeting, the Selectmen were brought up to date on 
developments in the Andover Technical Center by Mr. Stephen Casper, Senior 
Vice-president of R. M. Bradley and Co. They were advised that the Digital 
Equipment Corporation would acquire the unfinished building begun by Polaroid 
Corporation and would also take more land in the northwest quadrant. 
Furthermore, Wang would take an option to buy a considerable acreage in the 
northeast quadrant. 

A special meeting of the Board was held on May 9, 1933, at the Andover 
Country Club Estates subdivision in light of the many complaints registered 
by those residents along Lowell Street whose property was being adversely 

affected by the development. The purpose was to see at first hand the 
situation and to discuss ways and means of improving it. 

In view of the requirement that the Selectmen perambulate the bounds of 
the town every five years, Selectmen Poor and Silverman volunteered to do the 
boundary between Andover and North Andover in conjunction with selectmen from 
the latter town. 

Under the provisions of G. L. Chapter 639, the Board on May 12, 1933, 
agreed to support the formation of a Community Residence Association to act 



with Fidelity House and the Andover Housing Authority in developing a three 
to five year plan for housing the handicapped and in locating a five to seven 
room house in the Greater Lawrence Area for the purpose. 

The Town having received a substantial gift for the purpose, the Board, 
on May 27, 1980, approved the establi? iment of a Community Watch Program to 
aid in reducing vandalism in the town. The fund was to be administered by a 
board consisting of five Andover citizens, including the Chief of Police, a 
member of the clergy and an aducator; later a selectman was added. 

At the same meeting, the Board approved the establishment of a 
Ballardvale Center Study Committee to consider the development of that part 
of the town and make recommendations to the Planning Board and to the Board 
of Selectmen. 

After some backing and filling, Dr. Sanford Kaufman reached agreement 
with the Town Manager to buy the Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium from the town for 
$65,333. At its meeting on June 9, 1983, the Board approved conveyance of 
this property to Dr. Kaufman by the Town Manager. 

Mr. George Chongris having offered to give a parcel of fifty acres in 
the Fish Brook watershed to the town, the Board approved acceptance of this 
gift at its meeting on June 23, 1933. 

At the same meeting the Board, acting as Water Commissioners, approved a 
request of the T. D. J. Development Corporation to install a 12-inch water 
main wholly at its expense along the westerly side of Woburn Street beginning 
at Enfield Drive, thence southerly for approximately 3,383 feet in accordance 
with the Town's Master Plan. 

Also at the same meeting, the Board authorized the Town Manager to sell 
a parcel of land adjacent to the Dundee Instudtrial Park for §25,033. 

Again at the same meeting, the Board, after numerous public hearings and 
reworking of the text, approved a gravel removal permit for Cormier-Andover, 
Inc., for use in the development of the Andover Country Club subdivision. 

Initial discussions in Executive Session were held relative to personnel 
matters affecting the Department of Community Development and Planning, also 
on June 23, 1933. 

A copy of the long-awaited 1-93 Joint Transportation Study, prepared by 
the State Department of Public Works, which placed Andover' s two projects (an 
interchange at Lowell Junction and completion of that at River Road) in 
second and third priority for completion, was reported as received at the 
Selectmen's meeting of July 7, 1980. 

At its meeting on July 21, 1930, the Board confirmed its earlier 
approval of authority for the Town Manager to sell town-owned land off Essex 
Street for $25,033 by amendment of the original approval. 

At the meeting of July 28, 1980, the Board finalized the Land Use 
Questionnaire for circulation to all boards, commissions and committees of 
the Town government. At the same meeting a letter of congratulations from the 
State Special Commission on Observance of the 233th Anniversary of the 
Massachusetts State Constitution, dated July 14, 1983, was read. 

In light of the inclusion of the so-called "Proposition 2 1/2" on the 
ballot for the November 4, 1983, general election, the Board agreed to form a 
Property Tax Relief Committee to look into and make recommendations as to the 
position to be taken by the Board on this matter, as well as the matter of 
property tax reform in general. Selectmen Harris and Poore were designated to 
recommend the membership of this committee. 

On August 18, 1933, the Board received a petition from Mr. Sidney P. 
White for the convening of a Special Town Meeting during the fall to consider 

6 



adoption of a Town Bylaw authorizing multi-family housing and at the same 
time to rezone 18 1/2 acres of his property on Andover Street, if necessary, 
to permit Wynwood Associates of Andover to build town houses on the property. 

At the same meeting the Town Manager was authorized by the Selectmen to 
file the appropriate applications for grants of Federal and State funds 
needed for enlargement of the Riverina Road Sewage Pumping Station. The Board 
also endorsed the Town Manager's draft listing goals and objectives to be 
targeted during fiscal year 1981. 

A Request for Proposals, prepared by the Cable Television Advisory 
Committee, under the chairmanship of Attorney Reginal Marden, was approved by 
the Selectmen at the August 18th meeting, with the date for submission of 
amended proposals set at September 18th. 

On September 3, 1980, Selectmen Harris and Gammon were designated by the 
Board to discuss with GCA Corporation, Digital Equipment Corporation, and 
Awkwright-Boston possible ways in which the Shattuck family houses, of 
historic value, now on land purchased by Digital, might be preserved. 

At the same meeting the Board received the first part of the Town 
Manager's report on the Department of Community Development and Planning. 

The Ballardvale Study Committee, at the meeting on September 22, 1980, 
made its presentation on the disposition of the Bradlee School, improvements 
to Andover Street, and disposition of the Community Center, with final 
decision to be made on October 14th. 

The Historical Commission, at the same meeting, gave a presentation of 
those historic buildings owned by the Town which it felt should be preserved. 
The Board agreed to vote on this at its meeting two weeks away. 

Again, on the 22nd, James A. Booth and Dr. Norman F. Rogers were 
appointed by the Selectmen to the Board of Directors of the Greater Lawrence 
Community Action Council, Inc., for 1980-81. Appointments were also made to 
the Local Property Tax Relief Committee as recommended by Selectmen Harris 
and Poore. Represented were the Finance Committee, the School Committee, the 

League of Women Voters, the Senior Citizens, Shawsheen Village, Phillips 
Academy, Ballardvale, high technology industries, the Andover Chamber of 
Commerce and one member at large. 

After much study and discussion the Board approved on October 14, 1980, 
the obtaining of drainage easements extending from the municipal parking lot 
off Main Street, across School Street and ending at Phillips Street, plus an 
additional section at the Abbot Bridge Estates, in order to make possible the 
construction of the $250,000 storm drainage project. 

At the same meeting, having approved the position, the Board appointed 
Rodney P. Smith as Town Accountant-in-Training, effective immedately. 

Having agreed to call a Special Town Meeting to consider the matter of 
construction of multi-family dwellings, the Board, at the same meeting, set 
the date at November 17, 1930, at 7:30 p.m., at the East Junior High School. 

The Local Tax Relief Study Committee submitted its report to the 
Selectmen at their meeting of October 27, 1930, recommending against support 
of Question No. 2 (Proposition 2 1/2) on the November ballot. A minority 
report was submitted by Mr. Milton Greenberg, representing the High 
Technology Council on the Committee, who supports Question No. 2. 

Also on October 27, 1980, the Cable Television Advisory Committee 
submitted its report recommending that the cable TV franchise for the Town, 
along with a fifteen-year contract, be awarded to Rollins Cablevision, with 
Continental Cablevision in second place. After much discussion and at the 
urging of the companies, the Board agreed to authorize the Town Manager to 



hire a consultant to report on the financial condition of the two 
competitors, provided that the cost be borne by the companies and not by the 
town. This was agreed to and the hearing adjourned until receipt of the 
report of the consultant. 

At the same meeting, the Board, acting as Sewer Commissioners, agreed to 
increase the Sewer User Fee to $.56 per 190 cubic feet, in the interests of 
making the sewers self-supporting. 

At the general election on November 4, 1990, Question 2 was passed by a 
large majority, providing not only for a reduction in property taxes, but 
also in motor vehicle excise taxes and for the termination of School 
Department fiscal autonomy. At the Selectmen's meeting on November 10, 1933, 
the Town Manager estimated a shortfall in the town budget of $703,000 and 
suggested that it be absorbed 42% by the town and 58% by the schools. 

At the Special Town Meeting held on November 23, 1980, the proposals to 
adopt a bylaw providing for multi-family housing and to rezone certain 
parcels of land in the Town to accommodate such housing were defeated. The 
Selectmen, however, made clear that there would be a fully studied 
multi-family bylaw available for the Annual Town Meeting in 1981. 

A provisional license was granted by the Board at its meeting on 
November 24, 1930, to the Andover Twin Cinemas, construction of which was to 
begin soon in Shawsheen Plaza. 

The Town Manager reported to the Selectmen at the Board's meeting on 
December 1, 1930, that Shawsheen Village had been designated as a Community 
Area Revitalization District (CARD) which would permit the issuance of 
municipal bonds for small businesses without committing the full faith and 
credit of the Town. 

The last meeting of the Board of Selectmen for the year 1980 was held on 
December 15, at which time the Board adopted a policy for the uniform 
administration of liquor licenses which included the general terms of action 
to be taken on possible violations. 

At the same meeting, a conference was held with the Town's State 
legislators, Representative Gerald M. Cohen, Senator Robert Buell and 
Senator-elect Patricia McGovern, who will replace Senator William X. Wall, 
who also attended. The purpose was to discuss steps to be taken by the 
Legislature to support the cities and towns as a result of the effects of 
Proposition 2 1/2 and related subjects. 



Town Manager 



In calendar year 80 Andover' s tax base grew by nineteen percent, the 
largest growth ever recorded in the Town's history. This development occurred 
on an orderly basis placing little strain upon municipal facilities. 
Andover 's ability to accommodate and provide for major industrial development 
of extraordinary quality is the result of and credit to the years of prior 
planning and cooperative effort of many people over many years and capital 
investment in a water supply and distribution system, sewer system and road 
network. The existence of Interstates 93 and 495 has also been instrumental 
in Andover' s industrial development. 

During the calendar year a number of significant operational 
improvements were completed. Two years ago a computer system was purchased 
with much promise. By calendar year end all projected applications in the 
original proposal were all but complete. Utilization of data processing and 
retaining a town accountant-in-training to assist in the implementation of 
the new data processing and accounting systems has at long last enabled the 



Town to maintain current financial records reconciled during normal 
accounting cycles. 

The school building program, in planning for over three years, was 
finalized and bid specifications developed. In order to keep the project 
costs within the total authorized by the 1980 Annual Town Meeting 
approximately $800,000 in construction items or alternates were eliminated. A 
very diligent building committee and all others involved with the project 
look forward to the start of construction in 1981. Occupancy of Andover's 
completed secondary schools is scheduled for September, 1982. 

Other specific goals were identified by the Board of Selectmen and Town 
Manager to help direct the administration of Town affairs in Fiscal Year 81. 
High on the list was to undertake improvements in Ballardvale, e.g., drainage 
work and the repaving of Andover Street, replacement of the utility building 
at the Ballardvale playground, resolve of the structural problems of the 
Ballardvale Community Center and development of a future plan for 
Ballardvale. Unfortunately, it was less expensive to demolish the old 
Ballardvale Community Center in contrast to providing for its rehabilitation. 
A reading room was leased in the so-called Corner Cupboard building and 
improvements made partially replacing the loss of the Center. Area residents 
gave their volunteer labor to build a replacement utility building on the 
playground utilizing materials supplied by the Town. They also completed and 
submitted a planning report helping Town committees guide the future of 
Ballardvale development. 

A remaining problem, which has been under analysis for more than ten 
years, is the development of an alternative access to the Lowell Junction 
industrial area. The Commonwealth completed a corridor study for Interstate 
93 identifying resolve of Lowell Junction access as second only to 
improvements to the Route 128/1-95 Interchange. As in each of the past ten 
years, calendar year 1980 closed with little progress made on this issue. 

Other administrative projects included preparation and submission of the 
capital budget, leasing the West Andover Community Center to CLASS, and 
providing for the sale of the Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium and development of a 
juvenile alternative sentencing program. There has been, of course, a 
never-ending stream of routine administrative matters of the Town, including 
labor negotiatio and other personnel matters, budget administration, 
preparation for Town Meeting, Selectmen's meetings and the general oversight 
of various Town departments. Improvements are still required in the 
implementation of the newly-established central dispatching unit for police 
and fire. 

Of major financial impact upon Andover was the adoption of Proposition 2 
1/2 on a state-wide basis, a ballot question also strongly supported in 
Andover. The Superintendent of Schools and Town Manager and respective boards 
agreed the relative allocation of funds by prior Town Meetings for School and 
Town purposes should serve as the basis for implementing the financial 
constraints of Proposition 2 1/2. For one year Andover will be able to 
implement without severe changes in service levels the financial constraints 
imposed by Proposition 2 1/2. This is because of dramatic industrial growth, 
the completion of revaluation demonstrating our tax effort as below 2 1/2% of 
the full and fair cash value of the community, and various cost-saving 
management strategies implemented during the past two years under the four 
percent tax cap legislation. More severe service reductions for both the town 
and the schools will be undertaken in Fiscal Year 83 if tax revenues are 
permitted to only increase by 2 1/2 percent of the total levy independent of 
all other growth changes within the community. 

I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, members of 
boards, commissions and committees and members of the Town staff for their 
support and assistance during the past calendar year. Without their aid the 
accomplishments realized would not have been possible. 

9 



Finance and Budget 



Double digit inflation, rapidly escalating energy costs, and increased fixed 
costs faced the Town of Andover during budget preparation for the fiscal year 1981 
As required by Town Charter and Town Bylaw, the Town Manager's recommended fiscal 
year 1981 budget was distributed to the Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee 
on the third Friday in January, 1980. Many review sessions were held with the Boai 
of Selectmen and Finance Committee in preparation for their respective recommenda- 
tions to be included in the Annual Town Meeting Warrant. 

As all Massachusetts communities enter the second year of the state tax cap 
compliance legislation, the desire of town residents to maintain public services 
and improve facilities and services in the areas of school construction and public 
safety was pronounced at the annual Town Meeting. Voters unanimously overrode the 
appropriations limit and the levy limit by $1,502,209 and $1,200,000 respectively. 
Although appropriations reflected this increase, the Town was able to minimize thei 
tax increase to $2.00 or 3% for the second consecutive year. 

The relative stability of the tax rate has been accomplished due to two major 
factors. The dramatic industrial and residential growth in the town has expanded 
the town's tax base by $9,980,100 in fiscal year 1980 and by $19,395,300 in fiscal 
year 1981 for the largest increase in value in the town's history. The Board of 
Selectmen and Town Administrators have over recent years taken an aggressive ap- 
proach to increase non-property tax revenue sources. User fees, charges, and li»- 
censes have been increased so that the consumer of such specialized ans specific 
services pays the cost of such services. Town "estimated receipts" for the fiscal 
year 1979 budget were $2,324,100. This amount increased by 14.7% for the fiscal 
year 1980 budget to $2,665,400. Again, for the fiscal year 1981 budget, town esti- 
mated receipts increased by 41% or $1,094,600 to a total amount of $3,760,000. 

The implementation of data processing entered its second year and by the end 
of 1980 all of the core financial systems scheduled under the first phase of the 
data processing implementation schedule were in place. 

During 1980 the following financial applications were implemented on the Town 
computer: 

Water and Sewer Billing, Accounts Receivable, and Statistical Analysis - This 
system provides for billing Town businesses and residents for water and sewer con- 
sumption, posting the receipts for each account and maintaining statistical infor- 
mation related to utilization of the water and sewer system. 

Revenue Accounting System - This application provides for the detailed accounl 
ing of monies received by the Town Treasurer. It provides for the on-line posting 
of revenue accounts on a daily basis. The reporting features provide detailed and 
summary reports to all departments in the Town; identifying daily, monthly and cumi 
lative totals and comparisons to budgeted revenues. 

Property Tax Billing and Accounts Receivable - The billing phase of this 
application had previously been performed by a service bureau. All real estate anc 
personal property committments are now billed on the Town's computer. Accounts 
receivable posting, previously a manual process, is now fully automated. 



Assistance through the CETA program and Merrimack College Work Study Program 
provided benefits to the Town during 1980. The Town's CETA administrator performed 
among other duties, the coordination of the Town's energy conservation program. 
Energy audits were performed in five municipal buildings and seven schools building 
The State Office of Energy Resources awarded the Town matching grants totaling 
$2,650.00 for these audits. No costs and low cost measures were implemented to 
reduce energy consumption. Four municipal buildings are now on a preventive main- 
tenance program for their heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems. 






10 






An intern from Merrimack College assisted the Director of Finance and Budget 
w n the preparation of the Town's Five-Year Capital Program for fiscal years 1982 
:hrough 1986. This capital program and budget provides a vehicle for financial 
ind program planning for Town administrators, Board of Selectmen and Finance Com- 
littee. 

On November 4, 1980, the voters of Andover approved by an approximate 3-2 
mrgin a referendum commonly known as Proposition 2\. The Andover Board of Select- 
len appointed a nine member advisory group representing a cross section of Andover 
business associations, local government officials, public organizations and private 

itizens to study the potential effects of Proposition 7.\ on the Town. The Property 
'ax Relief Committee held several meetings prior to the November election and are 
;ontinuing to deal with the immediate concerns of Proposition l\ and property tax 

elief and in the long run the necessity for property tax reform. This is certainly 
;he major financial focus for the early 1980 's. 

Town Clerk 

At the conclusion of 1980, the total number of registered voters was 16,717, 
divided among the eight precincts as follows: 

1 - 1,875 3 - 2,267 5 - 2,208 7 - 2,142 

2 - 1,980 4 - 2,031 6 - 2,226 8 - 1,988 

The following Statistical and Financial Reports are for the period from 
January 1, 1980, to December 31, 1980: 

VITAL STATISTICS 
Number of Births recorded: 242 
Males: 127 Females: 115 

Number of Marriages recorded: 191 

Number of Deaths recorded: 204 
Males : 95 Females: 109 

Number of Dog Licenses sold :2278. Total amount collected was $9,463.00 
all of which was submitted to the Town Treasurer. Of this amount, $2,956.30 
was retained by the Town and the balance was sent to the County Treasurer. 

The number of Fishing and Hunting Licenses sold was 923. The total amount 
collected was $9,673.00 Of this amount, $216.50 was retained by the Town 
Treasurer. The balance was sent to the Division of Fisheries and Game. 

Other Monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Licenses: 772.00 

Certified Copies: 2,028.00 

U.C.C. 1,984.00 

Misc. Licenses: 2,916.00 

A. B.C. Licenses 29,250.00 

Business Certificates 30.50 

Misc. (Storage of inflamm- 
ables, Street Lists, Maps, etc) 3,683.00 

TOTAL 40,663.50 

Total monies collected were $59,799.50. Of this amount, $43,836.30 was 
turned over to the Town Treasurer, $9,456.50 went to the Division of Fish- 
eries and Game, and $6,506.70 was sent to the County Treasurer for Dog 
Licenses. 

11 



Town Counsel 



During the year 1980, forty-six cases were brought against the Town of Andover. 
Fourteen cases were successfully disposed of, leaving a balance of 99 cases pending. 
Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and Administrative Boards, 
Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town Officials on forty-seven 
occasions . 

Town Counsel rendered in excess of 108 informal opinions and had conferences 

with the Town Manager and with Town officials on almost daily basis. Telephone 

conferences with various Town officials, which often resulted in the rendering of 
oral legal opinions, occurred on approximately 267 occasions. 

Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended all Town Meetings. 

During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed, 
and numerous deeds, easements, releases, agreements and betterment assessments were 
drafted, reviewed and recorded. 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 



Under the terms of her will, the late Mrs. Margaret G. Towle, long-term resi- 
dent of Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover, to be 
held and administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the 
Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this 
fund "be devoted to the assitance or the procurement of assistance for worthy per- 
sons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or support 
on account of old age, disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Mana- 
ger with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from 
the Fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred 
to the Trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and in- 
terested individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-eight cases, dis- 
bursing $33,763.50 on approved cases (which numbered twenty-two) and small admini- 
stration expenses. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
$345,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the 
direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon 
vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of December 31, 1979 $141,362.57 

Receipts - 1980 31,895.34 

$133,257.91 
Disbursements - 1980 33,763.50 

Balance of Income - December 31, 1980 $ 99,494.41 



12 



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19 



Fire Department 



The Fire Department was established and is maintained by the municipality to 
provide protection to the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, 
explosion or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of 
this work, the fire fighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the 
highest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
concerning his work if he is to perform his duties efficiently and with minimum risk 
to himself and to his fellow fire fighters. He should have detailed knowledge of 
the dangers arising from heat, smoke and explosion caused by fire; of the hazards 
presented by new industries, processes, and materials developed by science; of the 
construction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or stored 
in them, and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high pressures. 

The objectives of fire protection are to prevent fires from starting, to pre- 
vent loss of life and property in case of fire, to confine fire to the place of 
origin and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
prevention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and 
dramatic action, has far greater appeal to people and fire fighters than fire pre- 
vention measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions and administrative "inter- 
ference" with what are termed "individual rights". 

The Fire Department installs, repairs and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
comprising of approximately three million feet of wiring, both aerial and under- 
ground, and associated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system | 
The Department operates from three stations - the Public Safety Center and the 
Ballardvale and West Andover Substations. The Department's fifty-seven men utilize 
seven pieces of fire fighting apparatus. 

: 
At the present time, twelve members of the Andover Fire Department are nation- 
ally registered Emergency Medical Technicians. All members of the Department have 
been trained in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation by two of our own members who are 
C.P.R. Instructors. All of the requirements of the new State Laws under the Depart- 
ment of Public Health have been met and the ambulance received a Massachusetts Li- 
cense in 1980-81. In addition, all members of the Department were trained to meet 
the State Law's requirements of the so-called First Responders Law and during the 
month of June all received refresher courses in C.P.R. and were certified as of 
July 1, 1980. A new Ambulance was purchased, equipped and placed in service Novembei 
of this year. 

Instituted this year and under the control of the Fire Department is the Central 
Communications Center. Here all emergency and business calls pertaining to both Firt 
and Police Departments are received. Currently, there are eight dispatchers answer- 
ing phones, transferring calls, and dispatching fire, ambulance and police officers 
to scenes of emergencies as well as communicating with both protective agencies on 
radio. When the new computer terminal comes available, a wealth of additional in- 
formation vital to the operation of both Police and Fire Departments will be acces- 
sible to this Central Communications Center; and response time, information on hand, 
and incidental information will be immediately available to both Police and Fire 
Departments. 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals and inns, as required by State 
statutes, were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper authorities.! 
Public and private school fire drills and inspections required by law were conducted. 
Mercantile, industrial, church, garage and service stations were inspected and re- 
ports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to the owner/occupants of dwell- 
ing houses of three or more apartments. In-service inspections were conducted from 
all three stations using radio-controlled fire trucks and full complement of fire 
fighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid storage and all such associated 
equipment were issued. Blasting permits, model rocketry permits and fire alarm per- 
mits were also issued in accordance with State Laws. 

20 



• 



The Fire Prevention Program was conducted during the month of October. Once 

again this year, the Fire Department conducted an open house at the Central Station. 
The response of the residents of Andover was overwhelming and made the endeavor 
highly successful. 

As in the past, the major cause of fire was carelessness. The misuse of smok- 
ing materials, children with matches and faulty electrical appliances and wiring all 
contributed to fires in the Town. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



(12- 


1980 
Month Period) 


1979 
(12-Month Period) 


1978 
(12-Month Period) 


Service Calls 




2 


,490 




2 


,028 




2 


,746 


riFires 






909 






924 






730 


False Alarms, Includes 
Accidental Alarms 






196 






71 






87 


Mutual Aid Calls 






22 






19 






44 


Approx. Value of Bldgs. 
/Yhere Fire Occured 


$9 


,751 


,626 


$ 


232 


,805 


$1 


,965 


,759 


Approx. Loss from Fire 


$ 


131 


,347 


$ 


110 


,242 


$ 


135 


,599 


Ambulance Calls 




1 


,102 




1 


,037 




1 


,027 


Medical Assistance Calls 






45 
















Ambulance-Mutual Aid 
i^to Other Towns 






16 






33 






43 


Ambulance-Mutual Aid 
to Andover 






32 






41 






55 


ton-Residents Billed 
for Ambulance Service 






321 






308 






313 


Fuel Oil Heat Installation 
Permits Issued 






215 






110 






180 


Explosive Use Permits 






16 






10 






19 


Building Inspections 






526 






482 






956 


Fire Drills Conducted 






84 






82 






107 


Fatalaties from Fire 













1 









Flammable Liquid Storage 
Permits Issued 






16 






14 






26 


Butting/Welding Permits 






4 






5 






5 


Fireworks Permits 






2 






2 






2 


Fire Alarm Permits 






38 






141 






98 


Rocketry Permits 






5 






6 






16 



21 



Police Department 



The year 1980 was an exciting year for the Police Department for many reasons. 
We had an addition of three new positions to the Department. One Captain and two 
Patrolmen positions, thus making a total complement of 44 sworn positions. The 
Department now consists of a Chief, a Captian, three Lieutenants, five Sergeants 
and 34 Patrolmen positions. We did, however, have one resignation in early August 
thus dropping our Patrolmen to only 33. 

In July, 1980, Andover appointed its first woman police officer, Barbara 
Connolly, an Andover resident. We have four Reserve Police Officer positions with 
only one being filled as of the end of 1980 due to the slowness of Civil Service. 

With the closing of an elementary school in 1980, six crossing guard positions 
were dropped in June leaving a total of 11. Civilian personnel includes two clerks, 
one information specialist, and one mechanic/maintenance man. 



In the interest of economy, we merged the dispatchers from the Police Department 
with the dispatchers from the Fire Department enabling the Town to have two dispat- 
chers on at all times for increased efficiency. The phone number 475-1212 was de- e 
signated to be the emergency number for Police, Fire and Ambulance service for the 
convenience of the residents in case of an emergency. 



Along with the other changes, the Police Department started computerization of ? 
its records on April 1, 1980. This created some problems because of the required \ 
information needed which increased paper work at all levels. in 

-1 

The year 1980 saw Andover 's first bank robbery in the history of the Town. 
We also had lightning strike our radio tower and the Police Department only had very 
limited communication for a two week period. 

o 

The Crime Prevention Program started in 1979 was in full swing in 1980 and as t 
anticipated, the program had a significant impact on the crime figures. The program 
is designed to get citizens involved and support the police; also to help the police 
so they can help themselves. Through this support and involvement and the alertness, 
aggressiveness and efficiency of the officers on the street, 1980 saw a significant 
reduction in all areas of criminal activity as will be shown by the figures to 
follow. Since we feel the only way to reduce crime effectively is through education, r 
the Department has developed a Crime Prevention Program for the elementary schools, 
including the Crime Prevention Dog, Mr. McGruff and Crime Prevention Officer Joseph 
Ouellette. 

Working with school authorities and increasing communication between the two 
departments, the Crime Prevention Officer was able to develop a vandalism program 
to assist school authorities in combatting vandalism in the schools. This coopera- 
tion between departments, with school principals and most importantly the students, 
saw a reduction of about 72% in vandalism in the schools. 

By the increase of personnel, we now have another cruiser on patrol on the p.m. 
shift over-lapping the two evening shifts. It is the addition of this car and the 
night Sergeant patrolling and answering calls that made a reduction in the mileage 
from the previous year. 

As stated before, there has been a definite reduction in all areas of crime in 
1980. There were 218 burglaries reported as opposed to 327 in 1979; which is a 
decrease of 109. The alarming figure of 972 acts of vandalism in 1979 was substan- 
tially decreased by 336 giving a total of 636 vandalism acts reported in 1980. 
With the continued efforts of the citizens, this figure will hopefully be lower in 
years to come. In 1980, there were 247 larcenies reported. This is quite a differ- 
ence from the 533 larcenies reported for 1979, 



22 



During 1980, there were 78 motor vehicles reported stolen. This is a decrease 
of 51 from the year before. The campaign started by the state to lower the rate of 
stolen motor vehicles by using stiffer penalties for the convicted auto thieves has 
begun to have its effect. There were 102 bicycles stolen in 1980 which is a decrease 
of 58 from 1979. 

There were, unfortunately, 1,059 motor vehicle accidents reported in 1980 which 
is an increase of 143 over 1979's reported 916 accidents. There were 10,071 parking 
tickets issued in 1980 as opposed to 8,914 issued in 1979. The police cars traveled 
355,675 miles using 38,326 gallons of gasoline. 

During the year 1980, there were 32 persons charged with drug violations; 4 of 
which were juveniles. Overall, 322 persons were charged with crimes, 36 of them were 
juveniles. 



The following chart shows a comparison of police activities over the past five 



years 



Misc. Complaints 

Breaking & Entering 

Larceny 

Stolen Cars 

Stolen Bicycles 

M/V Accidents 

li/V Fatalities 

Vandalism 

Mileage 

Gasoline 



1976 

5,886 

261 

501 

95 

155 

791 

3 

652 

360,024 

41,669 



1977 



1978 



1979 



1980 



4,287 


5 


,040 


5 


,620 


5,982 


207 




257 




327 


218 


242 




473 




533 


247 


83 




99 




129 


78 


117 




187 




160 


102 


829 




954 




916 


1,059 


1 




9 




1 


4 


271 




734 




972 


636 


346,377 


355 


,148 


390 


,102 


355,675 


39,295 


39 


,603 


42 


,311 


38,326 



In 1980, an anonymous donation was made to the Town to help the Crime Prevention 
Program and reduction of crime by inovative ideas. A Community Watch Committee was 
established representing civic, religious, education, law enforcement, business and 
citizens groups. The committee meets once a month to discuss various areas of the 
Crime Prevention Program and at times will meet with citizens' and/or neighborhood 
groups . 

On February 28, 1980, James F. Johnson was sworn in as Chief of Police. He had 
served in a temporary position of Acting Chief after the retirement of Chief Nicoll 
in late 1979. 



Dog Officer 



1979 

Lost Dogs 151 

Dogs Found 53 

Dog Complaints 2,803 

Dogs Sold 22 

Administration Fees $3,425 

Fees from Dogs Sold $ 66 

Money Turned in to Town Treasurer $3,491 

Owners Contacted for Unlicensed Dogs 920 

Cats Turned in to Pound 118 

Various Dead Animals Picked Up 384 

Impounded Dogs 247 

Number of Summonses Issued 226 

Amount of Fines $4,150 



23 



1980 

— 675 

16 

2,179 

36 

$2,603 

$ 102 

$2,705 

862 

80 

91 

214 

116 

$2,240 



Civil Defense 



Andover Civil Defense acts as a liaison between the State Civil Defense Agency 
and the local government. Andover Civil Defense coordinates the activities of Town 
Departments with the State's suggested plans and guidelines. 

The Auxiliary Police have training meetings twice a month. The majority of the 
Auxiliary Unit have completed a 17 week course, one night a week, given by the 
Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training Council. The Communications Sections main- 
tained their weekly meetings throughout the year. Both the groups have been very 
beneficial to our Departments and the Town this past year. 

The Radio Group helped coordinate communication during the special events in 
Town during the year; (parades, holiday celebrations, etc.). They also assisted the 
police when our radio tower was hit by lightning. Two pdlice officers were trained 
as radiological monitors. 

The year 1980 also saw a shelter exercise held at the Doherty School with the 
cooperation of the School Department. People from different walks of life were 
secluded in a specially prepared section of the school and for the three days had 
only crackers and water on which to survive. They also had to perform functions in 
the shelter that would be performed under real conditions; (exercise, training, etc) 
Civil Defense has a purpose. Not for every day activity, but those unanticipated 
emergencies and especially with the world situation as it is, this department should 
receive a little, more support from the Town. 



Central Purchasing 



The Central Purchasing function (involving the Town Government and Public 
Schools) has now been on stream for approximately four years and for the most part 
is functioning smoothly. 

Starting with fiscal year 1980, all bids are being numbered so that they can be 
identified by number, fiscal year, calendar year, and department. This is being done 
so as to tie in with the computers. 

Some examples of major bids put out by Central Purchasing in the calendar year 
1980 and fiscal year 1981 to date included: 

Drainage Construction 

Water Treatment Chemicals 

Cafeteria Paper Products 

Handicap Ramp at Library 

School Street Drainage 

Highway Guard Rail 

Demolition - Ballardvale Community Building 

Office Supplies and Equipment 

Driver Education - 1980-1981 

Replacement and Repair of Athletic Equipment 

Laboratory Glassware, Chemicals, Supplies and Equipment 

Water Meters 

Insurance for the Town of Andover 

Security Gates 

Andover Street Drainage 

Central Schools Drainage 

Plastic Refuse Bags 

Booklets - Language Arts/Fine Arts 

School Zone Lights 

Alteration to Corner Cupboard Building 

There were 1,931 orders processed for the Town Government and 5,048 orders 
processed for the School Department. 

24 



Through the bid process, the Town now has 4 main buildings on a preventive 
naintenance program and for the most part, this has been substantially effective in 
improving the Town's energy program. 

In addition, there have been a number of collaborative bids with different 
;ommunities such as: 

Heating Oils for all Town and School Buildings 
Police Vehicles 
Road Salt 



irl 



During this period, approximately 60 bid openings were held. The continued use 
Df State Bids and contracts (allowed under Massachusetts General Law) has proven to 
be beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 



Under Chapter 40, Section 4B of the Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 
political subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a wide range of goods 
and services. Andover purchased rock salt for ice control on the streets in con- 
junction with seven other communities. Fuel oil for the heating of the Town and 
School Buildings is purchased in conjunction with three other communities. This 
procedure is being expanded in areas where volume procurement can show savings. 



It is not really possible to operate as a business, but every effort is being 
nade to operate in a businesslike manner. 

The office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for insurance coordination 
ind risk management for the Town of Andover (Town Government and School Department). 
In the spring of 1981, the total insurance package will be bid to take effect July 1, 
L981. This puts the insurance program on a fiscal year basis as are all the other 
Town functions. 



The Andover Village Improvement Society herewith reports the acquisition of one 
liarcel of land during 1980. This two acre parcel abuts the Skug River Reservation 
b >roviding an improved access and an area for parking off Salem Street. 



AVIS 



Our annual ski outing on January 7 on the Harold R. Rafton Reservation was car- 
ried out in cooperation with the local chapter of the Appalachian Mountain Club 
AMC) . Over two hundred enthusiastic persons turned out to hike the trails as there 
as little snow to be found. 

The canoe races on the Shawsheen River on May 3 were favored again with fair 
kies and mild temperatures. While canoeists were in the majority, some kayak enthu- 
iasts also participated. Many family groups enjoyed the races as spectators, pic- 
icking on the grassy shore of the Shawsheen River and cheering on the participants 
s they approached the finish line. 

Through the cooperation of several groups and a number of Andover High students 
new boardwalk was constructed on a section of Deer Jump Reservation. The trail is 
creation and ongoing project of the Andover High School Ecology Club. The new 
"oardwalk is made of water resistant wood bolted to used car tires which form the 
>ase. AVIS provided the materials, and students did the work. Fred Baker's wood- 
'orking class constructed wooden sections and Brian Bebout supervised on-site assem- 
>ly. The Ecology Club is under the leadership of Phil Nelson who has done studies 
>n this area for a number of years. The public is welcome to walk this interesting 
rail, located off Brundett, prior to the entrance of Deer Jump Reservation proper. 

A wardens' meeting was held in October at the Andover Inn, for the purpose of 
:omparing objectives, airing suggestions and considering future developments. 
Several wardens reported on trail-building and other projects in progress on their 
reservations. Jared Clark, Town Manager, spoke on the relationship of AVIS to the 
Town of Andover. 






25 






Our annual meeting in November featured a film on the successful accent of 
Everest by the American expedition, "Americans on Everest". Nick Orrick was elected i 
president to replace Nat Smith who is on sabattical this year. 

An agreement has been made between Norm Tisbert and AVIS allowing him to work 
the field on the Shawsheen River Reservation for five years. This will maintain the i! 
land as a meadow while at the same time allow for the harvesting of hay. Corn will i 
be planted for one year followed by hay thereafter. * 

AVIS : A History in Conservation , an account of the evolution of conservation in 
Andover, was published - in November. Claus Dengler lovingly but firmly steered the 
project from its inception three years ago through publication perils and has pro- m 
cured a book which is of interest to all with a dedication to land conservation and |rf 
its objectives. The author is Juliet Mofford, a North Andover resident and local lb 
historian. The book describes the development of AVIS from its beginning in 1894, le 
when its aim was to "improve and ornament the streets and public grounds", to the 
present goal of preserving open spaces for citizens to enjoy. It is laced with his- 
torical tidbits and poetic touches including several of Harold Raf ton's limericks, i in 
It is handsomely bound and includes maps, pictures and illustrations. jo< 

We remind our fellow townspeople that all AVIS lands are open to the public )i 
subject to suitable regulations given on signs posted at their entrances. We welcome ft 
volunteer help in maintaining and developing our reservations, and any person wishing Is: 
to volunteer his services for this interesting conservation work may contact Claus 4 |n 
Dengler. 



John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 



. 



The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 17 of the 189 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy 
poor to purchase Wood and Coal. Three trustees, chosen on a staggered basis by the 
annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 

Balance on hand, December 31, 1979 $9,887.51 

Income 1980 280.25 

Drawn 1980 

Balance on hand, July 1, 1980 $10,167.76 



i 



it 



Development and Industrial Commission 

During the last year, industrial development in Andover continued at an unpre- 
cedented rate. Most of the land in the vast Andover Technical Center has been com- 
mitted to large, high technology firms of international reputation. In addition to 
new "glamour" companies and expansion of existing industries, smaller operations 
have also settled or expanded in town. Almost all of the land zoned in the three 
industrial classifications is in the process of being utilized for high quality 
industry. Andover is approaching the end of its remarkably successful industrial 
development program. 

The Development and Industrial Commission, as well as the Industrial Development 
Financing Authority currently comprised of the same membership, continued to be in- 
volved with representing Andover and insuring that inquiries and development plans 
were handled correctly and in the town's best interest. Work has been continuous 
with outside contacts, new companies, coordination with the administration and other 
town agencies, existing businesses and land owners. 

A greatly expanded and high quality industrial tax base, achieved at little 
capital or service cost to the town, with little disruption or inconvenience to the 
community, is testimony to the recognition of Andover as "the jewel in the crown of 
Massachusetts development". 

26 



lee 



'orl A year of lively outreach and further streamlining of activities characterized 
;he past twelve months at Memorial Hall Library. The closing of the Ballardvale 
Jranch in February of 1980 due to the condemnation of the Community Building started 
;he year off on a gloomy note but the anticipated opening of new quarters in January 
f 1981 brought about a happy ending. 



".( 



Through legislation the Massachusetts Regional Library System received addi- 
tional funds. Memorial Hall Library was on the receiving end with a substantial 
siihare. Also, through the system, the library is currently in the process of setting 
lp free terminal access to the Boston Public Library for cataloguing purposes, all 
,iade possible by a grant from the LSCA account (Federal funding). 



Special programs such as the MacArthur family singers, partially supported by 
i grant from the Council on Arts and Humanities and partially by a donation from the 
Indover Friends of the Library, were most successful playing to two capacity groups. 
'he English high tea replete with a bona fide English speaker was a most exquisite 
ind elegant affair with delicious, authentic desserts provided by our own local 
elc3ritish transplants. Film programs for adults and children, storyhours, displays, 
ishlassroom visits and book lists were just a few of the many outpourings reflecting 
JJsJLibrary activity. 

The Friends group under the able leadership of Carolyn Reynolds was very active 
ind supportive, and underwrote, as well as helped market, our major publication of 
he year "Emploring Essex County," a prodigious effort on the part of staff members 
fancy Richards, Dorothy Sherrerd and many others working together. 



Memorial Hall Library 



Another major publication "Clubs and Organizations," a compendium of Greater 
jawrence associations, proved most popular and there is great pressure for a new 
jdition. Owen Smith of the staff was the guiding force. She worked "The Family" 
series which has been coming out monthly. The Friends gave financial support for 
his project. 

The Trustees maintained their same number with the welcome addition of Richard 
isoian. 

Staff changes were few. In the Children's Room Kathleen Busch came in as assis- 
:ant Children's Librarian and Janice Zlatev moved up from part-time to full-time 
issistant. Leslie Baskin joined the Reference Staff. Frederick Baldwin came on as 
:ustodian. Evelyn Kuo, who had been a reference librarian part-time for six years, 
/as promoted to Coordinator of Automation and Technical Services to be responsible 
:or the reorganization of the former Technical Processing Department. 



The future of the Ballardvale Branch was up in the air a good part of the year. 
D {.'he enormous amount of work spent in going through the old collection, determining 
/hat to keep and telescoping the whole operation to one a quarter the size was a 
'eat of detail and back-breaking work only a librarian could truly appreciate. But, 
it was done and the outcome is obvious for all to see. The many people involved 
•anged from town officials to Ballardvale citizens who worked on the book sale and 
lelped prepare the new quarters and library staff, all pitching in where and when 
leeded. 



Much-needed security systems were installed. One set-up included a heat, smoke, 
^Intrusion alarm system and the other a book detection system. Fewer identifiable 
)ook losses are already evident in monthly figures. 



Emphasis on energy conservation was constantly in the fore. The library managed 
to use less oil than a prior comparable period. Weather stripping, caulking, ther- 
nostatic control, all were factors in bringing about reduction in energy use. 

Statistics are basically higher than last year. However, the ten-month Ballard- 
vale Branch closing skewed the figures. Had the Branch been open and doing no more 

27 



circulation than in previous years, there would have been a two-percent increase in 
overall circulation with the main increase in the Children's section. '0 

A ramp for the handicapped was built to the north of the Children's Room. Witl'^' 1 
the ramp and the elevator, handicapped patrons have access to all library materials ! 

The need for additional space is a pressing one. Even in such as era as this, 
the heavy use of the library warrants room for people to sit and stand other than 
elbow-to-elbow. An afternoon or a weekend visit would provide enough examples of 
library use to convince any doubter. 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



Adult 



Juvenile 



Total 



REGISTRATION 
OF BORROWERS 

BOOK STOCK & USE 
Vols, at end of 
reporting year 

Pbs. at end of 
reporting year 

Vols, added 

Pbs. added 

Vols, withdrawn 

Pbs . withdrawn 

Vols, circulated 
(including 
periodicals & 
pamphlets) 

INTERLIBRARY LOAN 

Books borrowed 

Books loaned 

AUDIOVISUAL 



1979 



2,814 



1980 



2,811 



1979 



725 



1980 



640 



1979 



3,539 



1980 



3,451 



117,904 121,611 



32,857 32,959 150,761 154,570 



276,149 271,961 110,471 110,764 386,620 382,725 



571 484 
9,588 8,797 
Records 





1979 


1980 


Added 


499 


566 


Withdrawn 


137 


176 


Owned at end 






of year 


5,617 


6,652 


Circulated 


22,058 


22,649 



Other AV 
1975 



1980 



7,066 


8,126 


1,672 


1,789 


8,738 


9,915 


6,218 


5,638 


906 


1,359 


7,124 


6,997 


1,857 


1,400 


434 


386 


2,291 


1,786 


1,714 


1,931 


327 


1,257 


2,041 


3 , 188 


188 


340 


191 


274 


379 


614 



10,144 8,755 



28 



3RAND TOTAL 

CIRCULATION 419,083 413,420 

PER CAPITA (based on est. 
PERIODICALS & 1979 1980 town population of 26,050) 

NEWSPAPERS 

Subscriptions 465 465 Book Stock 5.29 5.93 

Circulation 14.70 15.86 

Activity groups 

Adults 130 112 

Children 191 182 



Historical Commission 

The year 1980 presented many historic preservation issues to the Andover 
listorical Commission. A major factor in the Commission's level of activity was 

he hiring of Wendy Frontiero, Preservation Planner, for the months January through 
September. Funded by the Massachusetts Historical Commission and Town funds, Ms. 
r rontiero provided considerable inspiration and expertise in establishing preserva- 

ion guidelines for the Town of Andover. 

Among the issues and projects of 1980 were: 

Shattuck Farm . Negotiations continue with Arkwright/Boston to preserve 
the farm structures by their removal to the opposite side of Old River 
Road. AHC also assisted in arranging an archaeological dig (1980 - 1981) 
on the farm site, funded by the Catherine Shattuck Trust and coordinated 
by the Massachusetts Historical Commission. 

Preservation Plan . Outline of Andover 's development, historically and 
architecturally, with recommendations for methods of preserving local 
historical sites, for funding, and for public educational programs. 

National Register . Multiple Resource nomination including 41 individual 
buildings and 6 districts selected from the local survey of historic 
buildings. Districts include portions of Ballardvale, Academy Hill, 
Industrial Village, Central Street, Main/Locke Streets, West Parish 
Center. A major public information meeting was held in September for 
properties eligible for this nomination. 

Historic Buildings Survey . 79 structures were added to the local survey 
during 1980. 

Bradlee School . Participation in efforts to find acceptable re-use 
for the structure . 

Attention to preservation issues townwide, including Ballardvale 
Community Center, Stowe School, Bradlee School, Tyer Rubber Company, 
and other private concerns; provision of historical, architectural 
and funding information to concerned owners. 

Community Development & Planning 

Development activity continued at a high rate this past year. While there was some 
decrease in new industrial facilities, new single family homes and additions and 
alterations to all types of land uses occurred at a significant rate. During the 
calendar year, the Department's revenues exceeded $239,812, surpassing our estimate 
of $210,000. Subdivision design activity reached an all time high. 

Several resignations were regretfully received this past year. Ted Tyler, Acting 
Director of Public Health, resigned in January and was ultimately replaced by 
Everett Penney. William Meins, Inspector of Buildings, resigned in September to be- 
come the Chief Engineer for the State Building Code Commission. Sam DeSalvo, Local 

29 



Building Inspector, was selected to become the Inspector of Buildings. In additior' 
David Pattullo, Assistant Local Building Inspector, was selected for the new posi- ' 
tion of Assistant Inspector of Buildings. 

Several important projects were concluded during the year. The Topographic and Wet 
lands Mapping Program was completed, and this has had a very influential effect on 
the Town's review capabilities for all types of plan submission. In addition, the 
Board of Health adopted uniform criteria for sanitary sewerage systems entitled 
Minimum Requirements for the Utilization of Sanitary Sewerage Systems and also 
adopted uniform criteria for potable water wells entitled Well Water, Well Water 
System Requirements . The last series of major changes to the Town's development 
regulations, the Planning Board's Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivisio n 
Land , will be completed during this calendar year. 

THE PLANNING BOARD : 

During 1980, the Planning Board held twenty-six meetings. The Board approved a 
total of eight definitive subdivision plans creating 145 new residential lots. In 
addition, the Board approved eight preliminary subdivision plans, three of which 
were ultimately followed by Definitive Plans (the other five would create an addi- 
tional 197 residential lots) . Five Special Permits to Cluster were granted by the 
Board. Forty-five plans not requiring approval by the Board were so certified, 
totalling 112 lots. Eight public improvement/performance bonds were established 
and posted in the amount of $243,860, releasing eighty-three lots for sale and 
development. 



ffi 



:er 



The Board reported on thirty-six Warrant Articles during 1980. Eight of the Arti- 
cles were amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and three were adopted by Town Meeting. 
Those which were not adopted created considerable public discussion, especially tht 
proposal by Mr. Sidney P. White and Wynwood Associates relative to creating a new 
multiple family housing district and rezoning Mr. White's land at the corner of 
Argilla Road and Andover Street to accommodate "cluster housing". While these pro- 
posals were defeated, the sentiment of the Special Town Meeting led the Board of 
Selectmen and the Planning Board to commit to preparing a multiple family zoning 
bylaw amendment for the 1981 Annual Town Meeting. 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 



... 



Reorganization of Health Division personnel and quality control of existing prograu 
prevailed as the primary considerations of the Andover Board of Health in 1980. 

Appointment of a full time Director of Public Health in July and the restructuring 
of one sanitarian position to include additional duties of Environmental Affairs 
Coordinator has facilitated optimal utilization of personnel and expansion of oper- 
ating programs. Policy priority areas designated by the Board of Health for immedi 
ate staff attention included realignment of goals and objectives to accommodate 
anticipated financial constraints, review of office administrative procedures, con- 
tinuing evaluation of ongoing programs and survey of the quality of life status in 
the Town of Andover from the perspective of public health responsibilities. 



Enforcement of the Massachusetts State Sanitary Code, which includes minimum stand- 
ards for housing, minimum standards for installation of septic systems, and minimui 
standards for food service establishments, continues to be an integral part of Boa: 
of Health duties. Reports of food poisonings, failure of septic systems and housii 
violations have all been reduced significantly. Upgrading the quality of these 
regulations by addition of local rules and regulations has enabled the Board of 
Health to implement stricter standards than those required by state code. This 
procedure results in a healthier and safer environment for Andover citizens. 



ta 



i % 
Hi 
I! 
Hi 






The following is a statistical summary of permit and license activity for 1980 by 
the Board of Health- 



30 



fc 



u 



I statistical Summary: 



H 



"• 



n 



Sewage Disposal: Percolation Tests 106 

Soil Analysis (water tables) 461 

Septic System Plan Review 161 
Subdivision Plan Review (Individual) 105 

Consultations 325 

Final System Installations 175 

Sewer Connection Plan Reviews 19 

Septic System Repairs 30 

Sewer Installation Inspections 34 

Dye Tests 10 

Septic System Bed Inspections 89 

Food Investigation Activity: 

Food Facilities (Individual 

Inspections) 164 
Food Sanitation Course 

Certificates Granted 19 

Food Facility Plan Reviews 8 

Vending Machine Inspections 88 
Food Facility Sanitation 

Consultations 66 

General: Housing Investigations 21 

Court Appearances 6 

Stables Inspected 12 

Swimming Pools Inspected 5 

General Complaints 93 

Dump Sites (General) 13 

Industrial Waste Accidents 1 

Farm Labor Camps Inspected 2 

Pomps Pond Inspection 6 

Recreation Camps Inspected 2 
Whirlpool Baths Inspected - 8 Inspection 2 

Well Drilling Inspections 18 

Hazardous Waste Investigations 13 

jThe various forms of environmental pollution and the increasingly complex modern 

life style make the task of protecting the public health a formidable challenge. 
Although the greatest portion of the staff's time was again spent on reviewing and 

inspecting new home building developments, more and more time is being taken with 
other forms of potential environmental pollution. 



priority environmental issues now being addressed by the Board of Health include 
management, hazardous waste, control of industrial pollution and protection of water 
quality. Through the joint efforts of the Board of Health, Conservation Commission, 
and Massachusetts Department of Environmental Quality Engineering significant infor- 
mation is being gathered and rules and regulations and programs are being developed 
in order to preserve and protect the environment. 

ti The Board of Health has been appointed Dy the Town Manager to act as the coordi- 

i nating agency for a town wide hazardous waste management program. Preliminary steps, 

I including an industrial site survey and air and water quality monitoring programs, 

have already been taken to implement this important new area of concern for local 

public health officials. 



In November, the State Division of Hazardous Waste listed five sites in Andover as 
"Hazardous Waste Sites Requiring Additional Study". Considerable staff time has 
been spent on these sites and it is expected that four of these sites will be re- 
moved from the State's list within the next few months. 

Industrial sites are being watched more closely for air, noise, and water pollution 
violations. Cooperation between local industry leaders and government officials is 
already resulting in significant improvements in protection of ground water and 
ambient air quality. 

31 



Clinical programs in preventive medicine, operated under the direction of the Town ( t 
Nurse and Town Physician, continued to serve a large number of residents in 1980. 
The following is their report: 



sr 



CLINICS : 

Influenza : Free influenza vaccine (A/Brazil/78, A/Bangkok/79 and B/Singapore/79) 
was offered to Andover residents over sixty and to residents any age with chronic 
disease. Police, firemen and teachers were invited to participate as essential 
town personnel. A clinic was held October 22, 1980 at Andover East Junior High 
School Cafeteria and a second clinic November 5, 1980 at the Andover Senior Center. 
Volunteer nurses and registrars participated along with Health Department staff under 
the supervision of James P. Kartell, M.D., Board of Health Physician. Nursing homes 
and private physicians were given vaccine on request. The public health nurse 
immunized Andover residents in the office and at home if the patient's physician 
provided a written request for a flu shot to a homebound patient. 

Ages 5 6-19 20-44 45-64 65 

Academy Nursing Home 3 4 57 

Randolph Nursing 

Home 3 

10/22/80 

Flu Clinic 2 20 91 299 

11/5/80 
Flu Clinic 

Office 1 

Home 

Pvt. M.D. 

TOTAL ~5~ 

Pneumovax ; Pneumococcal vaccine was offered to Andover residents at the Influenza 
clinics, for a fee of five dollars. The vaccine was recommended for those over two 
years of age with chronic disease, patients with CNS injury where the dura is damaged^ 
patients with splenectomies, patients convalescing from severe diseases, patients in 
nursing homes and patients fifty years of age, especially those over sixty-five. 
Forty-one doses were administered to Andover residents in these categories. 

Amblyopia Clinics : (Lazy Eye Blindness) The Andona Society offered free Amblyopia 
screening to all Andover children ages three to six years of age. The testing was 
done at four clinics in April and May which were held at South Church, Andover. 
Screened — 177 boys and 149 girls — Total 326 



1 


8 


40 
10 




3 




9 
10 




27 


163 


428 


5" 61 



Referred — 8 boys and 10 girls — Total 18 

Nine of these children have been followed up by an eye exam to date. Three have 
been diagnosed amblyopia, four had glasses prescribed and two children had no 
recommended treatment. There are nine outstanding referrals. 

Blood Pressure Clinics : May 1980 was National High Blood Pressure Month. The 
Andover Board of Health sponsored two Blood Pressure clinics - May 15 and May 29, 
held simultaneously from 1-3 p.m. at the Andover Savings Bank and Arlington Trust 
Bank, Shawsheen Plaza. The Public Health Nurse and three volunteer nurses along 
with four volunteer registrars staffed the clinics. Considerable material was 
donated by the Heart Association for health education handouts at the sites. 
Individuals with elevated blood pressure readings were re-checked and referred to 
physicians. 1C 

Total screened 114 Known hypertensives lb 

Number with elevated BP 17 Referred to physician 

32 



; l Diabetic Screening Clinic ; Diabetic screening was offered to all Andover residents 
aver sixty years of age in May 1980. Ten elders were screened and one unknown 
diabetic diagnosed following further tests by a physician. 

Blood Lead Screening Clinics: Free blood lead testing is offered twice monthly to 



ndover pre-school children at clinics held in the public health nurse's office. 
Seventeen children attended these clinics in 1980 with one elevated blood level. 
Many pre-school children were tested by an outreach worker from the Greater Lawrence 
:ommunity Action Council Lead Poisoning Prevention Program. No elevated lead levels 
vere reported to be found. 

: ELDERLY HEALTH PROGRAM 



Outreach Mini Clinics 



Four health maintenance, health promotion and disease prevention clinics are held 
nonthly on Tuesdays from 2-4 pm. The first Tuesday the clinic is at the Senior 
Tenter, the second Tuesday it is held at Chestnut Court Elderly Housing Community 
lall and the third at Ballardvale United Church, fourth Tuesday is in the Frye 
ircle Elderly Housing mail room. The clinics are staffed by two public health 
lurses, a volunteer nurse and three volunteer recorders. Patients are provided 
vith hemaglobin testing, urine testing, weight measurement, monitoring of vital 
signs, counseling and referral to physicians or community agencies. Seven hundred 
ind fifty-five (755) Andover residents over sixty attended these clinics in 1980 
and fifty three (53) were referred to community agencies or private physicians. 

Vine hundred and fifty seven (957) Andover residents over sixty attended the drop- 
in clinic held weekly, Wednesday afternoon 2-3 p.m. at the Senior Center. Vital 
signs are monitored, counseling and referral are offered each patient as needed. 
Fifty four (54) patients were referred to a physician or community agency. 

Iwenty-eight (28) home visits were made by the public health nurse to Andover senior 
residents. 

Sixty-two health supervision visits were conducted by the public health nurse in 
the clinic-nurse's office at Town Hall. 

lOMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 



n 

"The Andover Health Department (one public health nurse and six Andover volunteer 
lDl nurses) at the request of the Andover School Department (nurses and health aides) 
participated December 1-5, 1980 in screening 2593 elementary school children for 
pediculosis. Thirty-four cases of nits and/or lice were discovered. All cases were 
treated and re-checked before re-entering school. The School Department requested 
l»ll parents of school children to help by periodically checking their children's 
pipair and scalp for nits of lice. 

The Public Health Nurse followed up two active cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 
nine cases of Salmonella, one case of Pneumococcal Meningitis, one case of Measles 
and one case of Giardisia. State regulations regarding reportable diseases are 
implemented by the public health nurse and she works directly with the Greater 
Lawrence Tuberculosis Clinic. Biologies and culture kits are obtained from the 
State and dispensed by the public health nurse to private physicians, schools and 
industrial health centers. Patients on tuberculostatic medications are monitored 
by the public health nurse monthly. 



Camp Merrymeeting and Camp Evergreen camper immunization records were checked by 
the public heal th nurse to be sure each child was immunized according to state 
regulation. 

One hundred and two negative Mantoux and eleven positive Mantoux were done by the 
public health nurse in 1980. School and nursing home personnel must be tested prior 
to employment. Positive Mantoux patients are entitled to a free chest x-ray at the 
Greater Lawrence Tuberculosis Clinic. 



33 



Five premature baby visits were made in 1980 upon referral from various hospitals 
in the Greater Boston area. 



Many important challenges and decisions will face the townspeople and the Board in, 
the year ahead. New emphasis will be placed on community health education programs c j 
designed to improve the health status of all Andover residents. Hazardous waste (1 
management and protection of water resources will be priority areas for concern in L 
the environmental health arena. Upgrading of rules and regulations pertaining to 
land use will facilitate quality control for future growth and development. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapters 40A and 40B, and the Town Bylaws, 
The Board meets on the first Thursday of every month in the second floor of Memorial 
Hall Library. Five regular members and three associate members are appointed by the 
Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings held by the Board of Appeals 
are the result of applications in the following areas: 

1. For a variance from the requirements of Bylaws; 

2. For a Special Permit under the Bylaws; 

3. By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector' 
or other administrative officer; and, 

4. For permission to construct low or moderate income housing within 
the Town of Andover (Comprehensive Permit) . 



tic 

3ft 

er 



ret 
lie 

ipa 

tfc'. 



tt 

pi, 
freer 

Itla 



Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified, as required |vo j 
by law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the 
Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearing, the members of the 
Board view each property in question. Based on their views and the evidence presented 
at the hearing, a decision is rendered, signed and filed in the Town Clerk's office. I 
Parties in interest are notified of the Board's decision. 



tan] 
'tar j 

Mi 

me 
llii 



During 1980, the Board held 12 regular meetings and considered 73 petitions 
involving 84 issues. The Board approved 36 Variances and 15 Special Permits while 
denying 11 Variances and 5 Special Permits. In addition, the Board granted 1 Com- 
prehensive Permit, issued 3 amendments to previous decisions, and decided two peti- 
tions for parties aggrieved by decisions of the Inspector of Buildings. 



ir: 



i 
I sc 



Three petitions heard during the year attracted considerable attention. The 
Sanford Kaufman, M.D, decisions permitted the conversion of the Cardinal Cushing 
gymnasium to professional offices and the use of two adjacent parcels for parking. *\ 
Tne Andover Housing Authority decision permitted the construction of 40 units of a « 



I 



housing for the elderly and handicapped at Chestnut Court. The Philip F. Wormwood 
and John P. Thompson II decision reversed a decision of the Inspector of Buildings 
to issue a foundation permit for the construction of a warehouse, office and pack- 
aging building in Lowell Junction (the decision of the Board was ultimately reversed 
by the Essex County Superior Court which upheld the Inspector's interpretation of 
the Zoning Bylaw) . 



Two areas of concern to the Board revolve around the several petitions of peo- 
ple desiring to construct towers for the purpose of securing ham radio antennae or 
wind energy conversion systems and the many petitions of people desiring to modify 
single family dwellings for the purpose of adding an additional dwelling unit for 
parents, in-laws, etc. At present, the Zoning Bylaw has no provision permitting the 
construction of towers and the requirements for a Variance cannot be met to accomo- 
date these proposals. In addition, while the Bylaw permits limited conversions of 
single family dwellings to multiple family dwellings, there is no appropriate pro- 
vision for such conversion for many of the petitions submitted to the Board. Given 
this set of circumstances, the Board is reviewing alternatives for possible bylaw 
amendments with the Board of Selectmen and Planning Board. 

34 



etl 



;,: 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Land Acquisition 



After prolonged negotiations, approximately 62 acres of mostly wetland in the 
floodplain and adjacent slopes of the westerly side of Fish Brook were acquired for 
the inhabitants of the Town of Andover by the Conservation Commission in 1980. 
These lands, portions of the Forest Hills subdivision between Cross Street and River 
Road were acquired partly by gift and partly by purchase from George Chongris, for 
i total expenditure of $133,000 from the Conservation Fund. Two Self-Help Applica- 
tions to the state for reimbursement up to 50% have been filed for these new acqui- 
sitions, which add significantly to the protected lands flanking this important 
component of Andover's water supply. Efforts to acquire or protect by other means 
the remaining open land in the Fish Brook Valley will continue. 

Title has also passed to the Inhabitants of the Town of Andover on two other 
parcels: the 11.6 acre " green area" portion of Old Schoolhouse subdivision off 
3ailey Road in West Andover (gift of Arthur Kalogianis, for Olympic Construction 
Company) and 1 acre parcel of Fish Brook wetland fronting on Greenwood Road (gift 
\rthur Kalogianis for T.D.J. Development Corp). 

Self-Help funds in the amount of $131,304.50 were received by the Town for 50% 
Df the purchase price of the Bald Hill-Wood Hill area, on both sides of High Plain 
Road, west of Route 495, and the Curtis Development property near the intersection of 
3reenwood and High Plain Roads. 

Wetlands Protection Act 



As development activity continues unabated in Andover, inevitably proposals 
involve wetlands, which comprise some 40% of Andover's area. The Conservation 
Commission, responsible for regulating activity affecting wetlands, held public 
hearings on 48 new projects during 1980, about 20% of which required more than one 
;: public hearing before an Order of Conditions was issued. No Order of Conditions 
issued during 1980 was appealed to the State Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering. 



Some 30 Orders of Conditions were amended, without the necessity for new public 
hearings, reflecting changes in plans. The Conservation Commission maintains over 
90 separate files on the many projects involving wetlands, ranging from back yard 
Landscaping activity to multi-million dollar industrial complexes. 



Surveillance of wetlands activity is maintained by all staff members of the 
Department of Community Development and Planning, as well as by Commission members, 
as their understanding of the function and importance of wetlands deepens. 
Unauthorized alteration of wetlands is cause for prompt action by the staff to 
require filing Notice of Intent and plans and to regulate the activity according to 
2 the law. 



Wetlands Maps 



The last 26 of the 183 wetlands maps prepared for the Town by Terrain Inves- 
tigation, Inc. were delivered in 1980. Blueprints of these maps are available at 
$5.00 a sheet, at 11 Essex Street. (The Department of Community Development and 
Planning) Townspeople may well be interested in having a print of their own 
neighborhood. These maps are very accurate and detailed, even to the location of 
fences, utility poles and individual trees. 

Developers and town staff alike are finding these maps invaluable for planning 
purposes. The Board of Health is using them to determine proper location of sub- 
surface sewage disposal systems, for instance. 

These maps can also become the basis for an evaluation of the relative signi- 
ficance of Andover's wetlands, giving guidance to town staff and town citizens as 
to where efforts at protection of wetlands should be concentrated. 

35 



Agriculture 

The Conservation Commission is committed to the preservation of as much 
agriculture in Andover as possible. Only a very few working farms remain of what 
was once a vigorous component of Andover 's economic base. This pattern, of course, 
is not unique to Andover. The State legislature has realized the importance of the 
revitalization of Massachusetts agriculture, and has appropriated funds for the 
purchase of Agricultural Preservation Restrictions, which are essentially the 
difference between the value of a given farm as farmland and its value for "highest 
and best use" i.e. development. In all cases support of the Conservation Commission 
and financial participation of the local community is sought. 

During 1980, one Agriculture Preservation Restriction application was filed 
from Andover for the Turner Farm. It has received preliminary approval from the 
state committee administering the fund, and awaits action by Town Meeting regarding 
the Town's participation. 

It is expected that other interested farmers in Andover may file during 1981. 
This effort represents probably the last chance for Andover agriculture. 

Management and Utilization 

Overseers appointed by the Town Manager to supervise the many separate holdings 
of Town land dedicated to conservation and passive recreation are active in various 
ways: clearing and improving trails, removing litter, reporting violations of the 
rules for land use to the Conservation Commission or the Police Department, recom- 
mending ways to use the areas legitimately. The total acreage involved is approxi- 
mately 900. 

Community vegetable gardens on the Shlakis property off Brundrett Avenue are 
thriving. A local farmer is producing hay and corn on this farm and several other 
conservation parcels, thus maintaining or improving soil fertility and keeping the 
open land from growing up to scrub and eventually woodland. The Commission feels . 
that though .agricultural use of some of the lands it controls may not be without 
problems, it is to the long-term interests of the community as a whole to preserve 
what it can of its lands food production. 

The Conservation Commission through necessity has had to deny many requests for 
firewood cutting on the lands it controls. Regulation of such use is impossible 
because of lack of manpower to organize and oversee it, and the damage from uncon- 
trolled wood-cutting would be with us for a long time. 

The Town sold 50,000 board feet of timber to Esty & Company from Carmel Woods, 
and removal under professional supervision was finished in late winter. 
The Commission is assured that in the long-run harvesting and thinning of the trees, 
and even the presence of slash on the ground will be beneficial to the health of 
the forest and the shelter of wildlife. 

The Conservation Commission through its staff has applied for a Youth Conser- 
vation Corps grant for improvements at Pomp's Pond. If funded, the project will 
finance some much-needed rehabilitation and improvement of the natural assets of the 
Recreation Park, including the woodlands under Conservation control, as well as 
surveys and tests of the pond itself. 

The Conservation Commission organized the celebration of Earth Day on April 22. 
The Andover Savings Bank kindly allowed the use of its lobby and a sidewalk for a 
Saturday of displays by numerous volunteers from taxidermy to gypsy moth control to 
recycling . 

BUILDING INSPECTION: 



The purpose and scope of the Massachusetts State Building Code is to provide 
for the health, safety and public welfare through structural strength and stability, 
adequate egress, proper light and ventilation, and protection of life and property 
from fire and other hazards during and following construction. 

36 



We have seen an increase this year in commercial and industrial building, as 
well as the usual residential dwelling construction. This will, of course, help 
with the tax burden on the taxpayer. Woodburning/coal stoves have increased the 
work load on the building inspectors this year, and we feel that this trend will 
continue for some time. Inspections of woodburning/coal stoves, special halls, 
nursing homes, group residences, places of assembly, swimming pools, motels and 
hotels and many other types of structures are required by the Massachusetts State 
Building Code. 

In addition to the building inspections, the building division administers 
lapplications for zoning variances and special permits. This requires much time as 
laccurate records must be kept for both office and public review. 

Following is a tabulation of the Building Permits issued for the years 1976 
through 1980. 



1976 
TB"3~ 

56 
360 
130 

72"9" 

I 97 

1 



Dwellings & Garages 

Other Buildings 

Additions & Alterations 

Other (raze, sign, swimming pools, 

etc. ) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



EST. VALUE 

$ 6,704,000 
1,237,253 
1,359,664 

189,077 
$ 9,489,994 



FEES 



$ 27,536.07 

6,051.00 

15.00 

$ 33,602.07 



52 
496 
122 

56~5 

70 

1 



Dwellings & Garages 

Other Buildings 

Additions & Alterations 

Other (raze, sign, swimming pools, 

etc. ) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 8,655,800 

619,751 

5,713,996 

201,117 
$19,190,664 



$ 44,410.00 

2,401.00 

150.00 

$ 46,961.00 



1978 
T6T~ 

47 
460 
164 

S3S 
61 

1 

1979 
TTT 

16 
554 
293 

"58*4" 

91 





Dwellings & Garages 

Other Buildings 

Additions & Alterations 

Other (raze, sign, swimming pools, 

etc. ) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



Dwellings & Garages 

Other Buildings 

Additions & Alterations 

Other (raze, sign, swimming pools, 

etc. ) 

Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 7,259,000 
8,062,394 
3,787,839 

212,769 
$19,322,002 



$ 4,421,000 

10,899,233 

7,967,647 

525,381 
$23,813,261 



$ 91,091.00 

1,956.25 

1 5.00 

$ 93,062.25 



$112,163.00 
2,038.00 

$114,191.00 



37 



1980 
70T" 

37 
541 

90 

"973 

91 
106 

16 
4 



Dwellings & Garages 

Other Buildings 

Additions & Alterations 

Other (raze, sign, swimming pools, 

etc. ) 

Chimney 

Certificate of Occupancy 
Certificates of Inspection 
Soil Removal 



$ 7,840,100 

20,399,796 

4,443,693 

260,763 
$32,944,352 



$146,827.00 

455.00 

5,300.00 

553.00 

2,800.00 

$155,935.00 



ioi 

lit! 



ELECTRICAL INSPECTION : 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding 
of persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. 

Enforcement of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the responsibility of the 
office of the electrical inspector in the building inspection division of the Depart 
ment of Community Development and Planning. The inspector also is responsible for 
enforcing fire alarm regulations for new homes; receiving and granting permits and 
scheduling inspections on a daily basis; inspecting all residential, commercial and 
industrial jobs; conducting and certifying inspection of schools, public buildings, 
day care centers, and nursing homes, formerly covered by the State; approving elec- 
trical plans for new buildings; inspecting all buildings for certificate of occu- 
pancy; assisting the Fire Department in inspection of fires due to faulty electrical 
devices or equipment and seeing that permits are issued for repairs due to fire 
damage; and attending school and classes on revisions to the electrical code and 
power distribution systems to keep up with standards. 



»0] 

ro 



or: 



1976 

178 
200 
3 
274 
"635 

1977 
T5TT 
190 

301 

"BTS 



TYPE 

New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boiler, etc.) 



New Dwellings 
Alterations &. Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boiler, etc.) 



FEES COLLECTED 

$ 2,852.00 

2,510.00 

90.00 

2,965.00 

$ 8,417.00 



$ 3,305.00 
2,073.75 

3 , 086 . 50 
$ 8,465.25 









1978 
T61T 
164 
2 
313 
"6*3~9" 



New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boiler, etc.) 



$ 4,411.00 

4,602.35 

735.50 

3,601.00 

$13,349.85 






15 



1979 

T3T" 

726 

133 

280 

725 

1980 
TB3~ 
133 
71 
221 
"5815 



New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boiler, etc.) 



New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boilers, etc.) 



$ 6,305.00 

2,261.00 

10,073.00 

5,572.50 

$24,211.50 



$ 8,525.00 

2 , 593 . 00 

11,044.00 

4,304.00 

$26,466.00 



F 



01 
31 
II 

:; 



38 



PLUMBING & GAS INSPECTION ; 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and gas installation is controlled 
by a State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code formulated by the Board of State Examiners 
of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under authority of Chapter 142 of the General Laws of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The office of the plumbing and gas inspector in the building inspection divi- 
sion of the Department of Community Development and Planning is the Administrative 
Authority authorized by Chapter 142 of the General Laws to enforce the provisions 
of the codes as adopted and amended by the Board of State Examiners. 

The Codes are founded upon certain principles of sanitation and safety through 
properly designed, acceptably installed, and adequately maintained systems to 
protect the health and safety of people everywhere. 

In addition to inspection, all applications must be reviewed and issued before 
any work can be started; complaints and violations must also be investigated and 
corrected or reported to the proper authorities. 



SEWER INSPECTIONS 



CALENDAR 


YEAR 




NUMBER OF PERMITS 


FEES 




1976 






37 


$ 370 




1977 






60 


600 




1978 






67 


670 




1979 






34 


1,525 




1980 






38 
GAS INSPECTIONS 


2,650 




CALENDAR YEAR 


NEW BUILDINGS OTHER 


TOTAL PERMITS 


FEES 


1976 




■ 197 


55 


182 


$1,359 


1977 




87 


69 


156 


1,048 


1978 




132 


49 


181 


1,176 


1979 




48 


252 


300 


3,000 


1980 




84 


227 

PLUMBING INSPECTIONS 
REPAIRS a 


311 


2,700 


CALENDAR YEAR 


NEW 


BUILDINGS REMODELING 


TOTAL PERMITS 


FEES 


1976 




204 


93 


297 


$4,136 


1977 




209 


105 


314 


4,385 


1978 




215 


113 


3 28 


5,354 


1979 




121 


205 


326 


6,394 


1980 




139 


51 


290 


7,648 



INSPECTION SERVICES : 

The purpose of the division of inspection services is to assure the compliance 
of private contractors and developers with the Planning Board's Rules and Regulations, 
specifications of the Department of Public Works and all other Town regulations. 

Under the direction of the Director of Community Development and Planning, the 
construction inspector enforces the rules and regulations of the Town. The area of 
work includes residential subdivisions and industrial sites with the scope of inspec- 
tions including the construction of the roads and utilities; specifically, subgrade, 
gravel, paving, sanitary sewers, watermains, storm drainage, gas, electric and tele- 
phone. Daily inspections are carried out on active construction sites with mandatory 
inspections at various stages of construction. A full testing program of utilities 
is donducted to ensure that specifications have been met during construction. All 



39 



sanitary sewers are low-pressure air tested and all sewer manholes are water tested 
for infiltration before being placed into service, Water mains are subject to three 
separate tests: pressure, leakage and bacteria. Unless all tests are satisfactory, 
no watermain may be placed into service. 

At present, there are approximately 40 residential subdivisions and industrial 
sites with over 10 miles of roads and utilities being constructed in the town. The 
levels of construction range from plans on paper only to completed subdivisions with 
streets submitted for acceptance by the Town. Approximately 700 inspections were 
made on these construction sites in the past year. This includes the testing of 
sanitary sewers and water mains. Separate fees for bacteria testing were instituted 
in 1977 with $1,635 being collected in 1980. Acting as an agent for the Conservation 
Commission, the construction inspector inspects the construction sites for conformity 
with the approved plans and Orders of Conditions issued by the Commission. The 
construction inspector works for the Board of Health on special projects. All Plan- 
ning Board, Conservation Commission and Board of Health meetings are attended by the 
construction inspector. In addition, the construction inspector inspects street 
openings and maintains a cross-section file on all street openings. Citizen com- 
plaints and questions on these construction sites are also handled by the construc- 
tion inspector. 

Veterans' Services 



|) 



Gl 



ki 



The office of Veterans 1 Services operates under the provisions of Chapter 115, 
of the Massachusetts General Laws. Through a Commissioner it provides two distinct 
veterans' programs, a benefits program and a service program. The benefits program 
provides monetary assistance for food, clothing, shelter, utilities, house supplies, 
personal needs, insurance, fuel, telephone and transportation as well as medical, 
surgical, dental, nursing home and hospital care for needy and eligible veterans and i 
their dependents. The benefits under Chapter 115, are paid by the Town and reim r 
bursed by the Commonwealth at a rate of 50%. The service program is a liaison 
between Andover veterans and their dependents and the Veterans Administration for 
services and benefits provided by the V.A.. The types of Federal benefits developed 
through this office include; compensation, pensions, education, housing, hospitali- 
zation, vocational rehabilitation, aid and attendence, dependency and indemnity W 
benefits, burial benefits and home loans. The Federal V.A. benefits under Chapter 
38 of the Federal Statute are paid directly to claimants. This office works dili- if' 
gently to develop these Federal benefits since they reflect a great savings to local 
taxpayers . 

During 1980 the Federal law increased compensation rates by 13 percent for a 
veteran rated at 10 to 40 percent disabled and more than 14.3 percent for more 
seriously disabled veterans. The legislation also increased from $25,000 to $ 27 , 000 Ml 
in the amount of a V„A. home loan guaranty for conventional homes. It also increasedSAI 
by 10 percent G.I. Bill educational and training benefits and a 17 percent increase 
in the vocational rehabilitation program allowances. 



The opening of the initial phase of the 750 acre Veterans' National Cemetery 
at Otis Air Force Base on Cape Cod took place October 11, 1980. Burials of veterans 
and their immediate dependents are presently being accepted. The initial phase 
consists of 32 acres of landscaped topography with gravesites for 8500 graves. 

ib 

The Veterans Agent is also the Town burial agent. The law requires that all 'it 
veterans' graves will be properly cared for and decorated. It provides for proper lit 
burial of a veteran and financial assistance provided if necessary. During the past tr 
year, forty-three veterans died; twelve World War One, twenty-nine World War Two, lo 
and two Korean Veterans. The dependents of these veterans were assisted in making ■ 
applications for the benefits to which they were entitled. ill 

nt, 

Veterans' Day and Memorial Day Services are coordinated through this office *> 
with local veterans of the American Legion Post 8 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars lie 
Post 2128. The graves of more than 1150 veterans interred in local cemeteries are lie 
decorated on those holidays with a new American flag. *& 

40 



Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High School 



The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
School is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to Estab- 
lish a Regional Vocational School District. Participating communities in the Region 
are the City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 

The content of the Annual Report under the terms of the Agreement is to contain 
a detailed financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current year. 
Further, it is required that for each budget period there be included a statement 
showing the method by which the annual charges assessed to each member community 
were computed. 

Lastly, along with statistical and financial data, the Regional School Commitee 
may add such additional information relating to the operation and maintenance of the 
Regional School as deemed necessary or appropriate. 

PROGRAM STATISTICAL REPORT 



REGULAR DAY SCHOOL 



:\ GRADE 

MUNICIPALITY ' 
ANDOVER 

LAWRENCE 

METHUEN 

NORTH ANDOVER 

TOTAL 



ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 1, 1979 



10 



11 



12 



13 



14 



PG PG 
I II 



Pre- 

Voc TOTAL 



30 16 21 23 4 2 7 18 112 

359 371 305 242 12 24 9 15 1 1338 

86 99 84 75 8 12 1 3 2 368 

23 23 13 21 2 6 2 12 93 

498 509 423 361 24 44 19 20 13 1911 



GRADUATES JUNE 1980 



GRADE 12 

GRADE 13 

GRADE 14 

POSTGRADUATE 

LPN 

TOTALS 



NUMBER 
GRADUATED 

3"6T 

19 



16 

36 

432 



NUMBER 


ARMED 


PLACED 


SERVICES 


284 


' 7 


17 











12 


2 


35 





342 


9 



HIGHER 
EDUCATION 

70 - 

2 

2 

74 



Courses available for Regular Day Students (1979-80) 



Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Auto Body Repair 

Automotive Repair 

Carpentry 

Clothing and Modeling 

Commercial Art 

Culinary Art 

Data Management 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Health Service 

Heavy Equipment 



Home Management 

Machine Shop 

Major Appliance Repair 

Metal Fabrication 

Painting and Decorating 

Pipef itting 

Plant Maintenance 

Radio and T.V. 

Small Engine 

Upholstery 

Cosmetology 

Dental Assistant 



41 



EVENING SCHOOL STATISTICS 
SCHOOL YEAR 1979-80 

PARTICIPATION BY PROGRAM 

^Q URijE MALE 

Trade Extension 262 

Preparatory 459 

Evening Practical Arts 33 

Novice 55 

Apprent ice 101 

Total '9T0* 

PARTICIPATION B Y COMMUNITIE S 

city or towit 

Lawrence 395 

Methuen 247 

Andover 81 

North Andover 53 

Massachusetts Non-Resident 99 

New Hampshire 35 

Total 9TTJ 

SUMMER SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 197 9-80 (SUMMER 1979) 

PARTICIPATION BV COMMUNITIES 

Andover 76 

Lawrence 157 

Methuen 81 

North Andover 25 

Non-resident 1 

Total 3TU 

PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 



FEMALE 


TOTAL 


19 


281 


192 


651 


217 


250 


95 


150 


6 


107 


329" 


1439 



264 


659 


149 


396 


47 


128 


33 


86 


26 


125 


10 


45 


329 


1439 



30 

105 

51 

25 



2TT 



STUDENTS 


PERCENT 


OF 


NEW 


CO-OP 


EMPLOYED 


SENIOR CLASS 


AGREEMENTS 


277 


78% 






30 


310 


87% 






7 


317 


89% 






4 


322 


90% 






2 


312 


90% 






6 


319 


92% 






5 


324 


94% 






5 


322 


96% 






5 


343 


98% 






27 



106 
262 
132 
50 
1 
33T 



September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

June 

As of graduation day in June, 1980, over ninety-eight percent of the senior 
class had received employment. The business firms with Cooperative Work Agreements 
with the school numbered 1022, an increase of 91 companies within one year. 

FACILITY USE 

Following a policy adopted when the school was initially built, the school has 
been made available to organizations within the region who desire to use many of tt 
school's varied facilities. 



During the school year 1979-80 over fifty organizations used the facilities 
for a total of nearly 2,000 hours. 






42 



FISCAL YEAR 1980 APPROVED BUDGET 



July 1, 1979-June 30, 1980 



General Control 

Expense of Instruction 

Day School 3,246,158 
Evening School 81,815 

Total Expense of Instruction 

Auxiliary 

Cost of Transportation 

Operation of Plant 

Maintenance of Plant 

Special Charges 

Miscellaneous 

Outlay 

Debt Retirement and Service 

GRAND TOTAL 



$ 140,651 



3,327,973 
190,103 
250,881 
565,054 
349,737 
309,388 
68,663 
119,510 
514,160 

5,836,120 



FUNDS FOR REDUCTION - Estimated 



School Building Assistance Bureau 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 

P.L. 81-874 

Chapter 70 

Occupational Ed. 2,190,188 
Low Income 59,295 

Special Ed. 79,424 

Evening School 43 , 144 

Other Funds 

Chapter 71, Section 16D Funds 
Total Funds For Reduction 

NET TOTAL 



276,919 

111,895 

14,157 

2,372,051 



400,000 
987,919 
4,162,941 71.3% 

$ 1,673,179 28.7% 



BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



Andover 
Lawrence 
Methuen 
North Andover 



Total Payment 

$ 153,932 

1,052,430 

366,427 

100,390 



4 Equal Payments 

Aug.l, 1979, Dec. 1, 1979 

April 1, 1980, June 1, 1980 

$ 38,483.00 

263,107.50 

91,606.75 

25,097.50 



Note: Special Education $233,488 increase of $120,203 or 103% from FY79 



43 



ACCOUNT 

NUMBER DESCRIPTION 

1000 General Control 

2000 Expense of Instruction 

3000 Auxiliary Agencies 

3350 Cost of Transportation 

4100 Operation of Plant 

4200 Maintenance of Plant 

5000 Special Charges 

6000 Miscellaneous 

7000 Outlay 

8000 Debt Retirement/Service 

TOTALS 



GREATER LAWRENCE REGIONAL 

VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

BUDGET REPORT 

FISCAL YEAR 1980 



BUDGET 
140,651 
3,327,973 
190,103 
250,881 
565,054 
349,737 
309,388 
68,663 
119,510 
514,160 

5,836,120 



TRANSFER 
8,330.02 
6,572.02 
24,365.70 
14,961.60 
28,026.70 
19,370.13 
14,714.14 
58,393.59 
15,374.40 



ADJUSTED 
BUDGET 

148,981.02 

3,321,400.98 

214,468.70 

265,842.60 

593,080.70 

369,107.13 

294,673.86 

10,269.41 

104,135.60 

514,160.00 

5,836,120.00 



12/12/80 



EXPENDITUB 

1, 

148, 981. cj 
3,321,400.9 
214,468.7 
265,842.6 
593,080.7 
369, 107. 1J 1 
294,673.8 
10,269.4 
104.135.6H 
514,160.0 

5,836,120.0 



EXCESS /DEFICIENCY ANALYSIS 
June 30, 1980 

School Building Assistance $ 31,263.56 

Pupil Transportation (23,569.00) 

P.L. 81-874 12,665.09 

Chapter 791 (Ch. 74) Revised Chapter 70 416,928.00 

Chapter 71, Section 16D 21,554.27 

Equipment Fund 47 , 135 . 33 

Insurance Recoveries 7 , 813 . 73 

Unrestricted Fund 579 , 740. 06 

Balance at June 30, 1980 $1,093,531.03 



Fiscal Year 1981 



(400,000.00) 



Fiscal Year 1982 



693,531.03 
(400,000.00) 



$ 293,531.03 



44 



I 



Housing Authority 



The Andover Housing Authority, since its organization in June of 1948, has held 
gular monthly and special meetings at the Main Office, 100 Morton Street. During 
l|80 there were ten regular meetings and three specials. 

At the Annual Meeting of May 22, 1980, the following officers were elected 
f!r the coming year: Chairman, Winston A. Blake; Vice Chairman, Thomas P. Eldred; 
Measurer, Thomas R. Wallace; Assistant Treasurer, Atty. Richard A. Savrann; and 
Asistant Secretary, Mary Jane Powell. It is interesting to note the dedication of 
fcese elected officials who have compiled such an enviable record of service to the 
flmmunity. Mr. Thomas Wallace is the senior member of the group with twenty-eight 
jiars of service. Thomas P. Eldred has been a member of the Authority for twenty- 
fve years. The Chairman, Winston A. Blake, has eighteen years of continous service, 
Itorney Richard Savrann has served for ten years and Mary Jane Powell, the state 
■pointed member, four years. 






The Andover Housing Authority manages 176 elderly and 56 family units. These 
■elling units are contained in the thirty separate buildings located at Memorial 
Crcle, Chestnut Court, Grandview Terrace and Frye Circle. 

This year's average monthly rent in the elderly projects was $94.00, and 
$45.00 per month for the family project. As a result of these low and moderate 
marges, the expenses which are accrued by the Authority are met by a combination 
rental income and a Commonwealth contribution. The Town of Andover has abso- 
ltely no financial obligation in the construction or operation of these housing 
pojects . 

As the private housing sector continues to experience high maintenance and 
ifaility costs which must be reflected in higher rents, the Authority must face the 
icreasing volume of pending applications from family and elderly Town residents who 
fnd it ever more difficult to locate housing within the realm of their income. 

The waiting list for public housing units in Andover consists of 216 elderly 
aplications, and there are approximately 148 applications for family units. 

There are three tenant organizations representing all four housing projects 
i Andover. The modernization program which has proven very successful in our 
cder projects is regulated by the Department of Community Affairs and provides 
■r an involvement in management objectives by the tenant organizations. Active 
prticipation by our tenant groups has had a marked effect on the modernization 
wrk that has been completed as well as projects that are currently underway. 

S ction 8 - Housing Assistance Program - HUD - Federal 

This Federally subsidized program permits applicants to live in private accom- 
odations paying approximately 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent. The 
Athority makes up the difference which is payable directly to the landlord. The 
Iwn of Andover receives full taxes from the participating property owner. 

All of the forty-four units (28 elderly and 16 family) allocated to the Andover 
husing Authority are under lease. This popular program has a waiting list of 235 
Eiplicants. An application for ten more units is presently on file with the Federal 
£>vernment. 

C iapter 707 - Department of Community Affairs 

This state subsidized program is a carbon copy of the Federal Section 8 Program, 
: was during 1978 that this program was first implemented by the Andover Housing 
athority. There are 120 applicants on our waiting list. 

This Authority has just twenty units (9 elderly and 11 family) under lease, 
ht the program is very popular and more units will be applied for when there is 

45 



further call for applications by the Department of Community Affairs. 

VETERAN PROJECT 200-1 

This project now in its 30th year of occupancy, is a 12 building complex loc; 
ted at Memorial Circle near Chestnut and Morton Streets. There are 56 two, three 
and four-bedroom units. 

The income limits are: 

Two persons $ 9,280.00 

Three persons 10,440.00 

Four persons 11,600.00 

Five persons 12,325.00 

Six persons 13,050.00 

Seven persons 13,775.00 

Six new families moved into the project this year and four families moved 
onsite. The average monthly rent is $145.00. 

INCOME EXPENSES 



Rents and Interest $ 97,560.45 Administration $ 11,924.40 

Deficit prior to Common- Utilities 84,024.35 

wealth Contribution (48,350.39) Maintenance & Labor 20,311.61 

General Expense 6,376.78 
Total Income $ 145,911.34 Reserve & Debit 

Service 23,274.20 



Total Expense $ 145,911.34 

FRYE CIRCLE, GRANDVIEW TERRACE AND CHESTNUT COURT PROJECTS 667-C2 

The Elderly Housing Project, Andover 667-C2, consist of 176 one-bedroom units 
The yearly income limits are: 

One person $8,120.00 

Two people 9,280.00 

The average monthly rental is $94.00. In the last 12 months, 13 tenants move; 
into these projects and 3 moved within the projects. 

The following is a summary statement of incoms and expenses for these Elderly 
Projects for the last 12 months: 

INCOME EXPENSES 

Rents and Interest $ 202,868.47 Administration $ 30,305.02 

Utilities 105,136.78 

Maintenance & Labor 51,993.56 

General Expense 10,199.56 

Residual Receipts 5, 233 . 55 

Total Expense 202,868.47 

Community Services 

The Department of Community Services operated at a peak level in 1980. All 
positions were filled and the only transition was that of the part-time secretary : 
raid-summer. The quality and efficiency of programming reflected the knowledge and 
experience of a very capable staff. 

46 



The Department offered a wide variety of programs throughout the year. A total 
d over 350 classes, workshops and special events were featured in the year round 
Digram. 

In an effort to consolidate its programs into a more efficient system the De- 
)rtment developed a combined Winter/Spring program which started during the last 
»3k of February. Many of the evening adult education classes were moved into the 
I^h School from other schools to conserve energy. 

A "mini winter program" was offered during January and February. 

Nearly 3000 individuals participated in the Winter/Spring Program classes and 
pcial events. In addition to registered activities open gyms continued to be very 
pular especially at the junior high level. These increased from one to two nights 
.r week at East Jr. and started again for the first time in several years at West 
nior High. 



Winter activities included many traditional elementary school special events, 
roior and senior high school weekend ski trips to Sugarloaf Mountain; skiing lps- 
sns for grades three through six at Bradford Hill; field trips to Boston to see the 
pities and Bruins in action; the Elementary School Gymnastics Meet; plus the Floor 
key and Volleyball Tournaments once again proved to be very popular. 



In an effort to focus in on special events for families this year the Depart- 
nnt offered trips to the popular Boston's Children's Museum, the John F. Kennedy 
Lbrary, and to Le Grand David and His Own Spectacular Magic Company in Beverly, 

U3S. 

The Andover Series (formerly the Andover Cultural Series) offered an exciting 
fmily event "The Wrong Gong Show" which attracted 55 Andover contestants of all 
aes and 400 spectators. The Andover Series also brought the Arts to Town with the 
prformances of the National Marionette Theatre and the Concert Dance Co. of Boston. 

With the closing of the Ballardvale Community Center due to structural problems, 

dytime and evening classes held at the center had to be relocated; the classes were 

bused in the Senior Center on Essex Street and in 3 churches in Town (Faith Luther- 
a, West Parish, South). 

Spring programs included the annual Kite Flying Contest, the Spring Exhibit, 
Snday afternoon Bike Hikes, Crafts in the Park, a variety of adult tennis classes 
ttd the start of another season of the Men's Softball League. 

During the summer months the Department provided many different leisure oppor- 
tnities for both children and adults. Playgrounds offered children in grades K 
trough 8 chances to participate in sports, games, arts and crafts, cookouts, field 
tips, and special events such as theatrical performances, the Fourth of July Cele- 
bation, Good Sports Competition and the Peanut Carnival. Similar activities were 
ofered to pre-schoolers at the West Elementary and Sanborn Schools. Other activi- 
tes included an Andover entry in the Middle Essex Girls Softball League; tennis 
lssons and tournaments; developmental track and field meets; a twice a week Hampton 
Each bus shuttle; an elementary school gymnastics program; boys and girls basket- 
till clinic; soccer clinics; Red Sox Family Night; a "Hole in One" Golf Competition; 
a 'Outdoor Adventure" program for teens; supervised evening bike hikes and various 
ault enrichment classes. Pomps Pond offered many recreational and educational 
cportunities. In addition to public swimming, canoeing, and two "Fun Days" for 
yungsters, swimming lessons and a public service course in Basic and Advanced Res- 
ce and Water Safety were available to individuals of all ages . With assistance 
iom an Arts & Humanities grant, two concerts were held at Pomps Pond as part of the 
igular summer concert series. The summer performances and movies in Central Park 
atracted well over 3000 people. 

The instructor for 1he Parent-Infant Development and Parent-Toddler Development 
(lasses held a Pre-School Reunion for 50 mothers and their babies in her back yard in 

agust. 

47 



The Special Needs playground which did not have a home base facility again thiJH 
year because of the lack of Recreation Park Lodge was moved to the Town of North 
Andover. The program was very successful although the cost of transportation doublet 

Children's performances during the summer were held in various locations which i 
were attended by 450 families. 

Fall programs had over 3300 registered participants in the numerous classes, 
workshops, and special events. It was once again offered in conjunction with the 
Phillips Academy Evening Study Program. Academic, recreation, public service, cul- 1 
tural, and craft skill courses were offered for every age group. Fall special even f 
included: the "Andy 500" soap box derby; the Five Mile Road Race, which drew a fievl 
of over 200 runners, the first 100 of whom got Road Race shirts - a new feature of 
the event; the Fifth Annual Ten Mile Bike Race; and a very popular "Andover Night ad 
Roll-On-America" that drew over 400 roller skating enthusiasts. Andover' s second 
Haunted House at Stowe was literally an overwhelming success, spooking 500 ghosts ai 
goblins this year. Many junior high school students and adults volunteered and loc; 
stores donated candy and other special effects which helped to minimize costs. 

The year ended with a multitude of Christmas holiday workshops for children an<| 
adults. 

I 
The combination of tax cap legislation followed by the passage of Proposition 
2\ has resulted in a mandate by the Town for a substantial increase in Department 
revenue. Though revenues have nearly doubled in the past 3 years the Department is | 
now striving to reach $150,000 which would be an additional increase of about 75% 
over 1980. New fees will be instituted for programs previously free and all current 
fees will be substantially increased. There was a decline in participation in cer- 
tain program areas when fees were raised significantly in 1979. It is hoped Hat in 
future years the Department will be able to achieve a balance which achieves the 
revenue goal without virtually pricing programs out of existence. 

Because of diminishing CETA funding available for public service employees in 
the Town, the Department's maintenance crew was cut down in size to one full-time 
year-round individual. In the summer, the crew operated with the assistance of foiii 
part-time youth workers provided through the the CETA program. A new truck was pur- 
chased in August. It replaced the seven year old vehicle that had been steadily 
deteriorating and costing more to repair each year. 

Aside from daily tasks such as the pick-up of Recreation Park roadway and the 
general maintenance of the Pomps Pond/Recreation Park area, the Department's mainte- 
nance section was responsible for a variety of major projects including: setting up 
for the annual recycling auction, preparing for tie annual Fourth of July Celebratior 
and the cleaning out of the Ballardvale Community Center and Cardinal Cushing Gymna- 
sium. 

With a curfew placed at Recreation Park the evening crowds diminished and there 
also was a decrease in overall park vandalism. Though much effort and preparation 
was again put forth, funds for the Rec Park Lodge did not receive approval at Town 
Meeting. The close of the year found the Department with the Iceland Road building 
as its only remaining "Community building" and this is used purely for storage. 

The Department itself relocated to Doherty School in late November. Assistance 
from the School Department helped produce a smooth transition. The accommodations 
at Doherty are excellent though temporary. The building is also being used to store 
the wide array of Department supplies and equipment. 

The Community Services Committee continued its efforts in the areas of Youth 
Needs and Scarce Resources. In addition a sub-committee was formed to study the 
area of Mental Health. The major project embarked upon mid year was the Recreation 
Park Master Plan. This was a joint effort involving all committee members as well a 

Department staff. 

In addition to its advisory roles on the Community Services Committee and the 
Council on Aging, staff continued to be involved with the Task Force on Drug & Alco- 
hol Awareness, Community Education Association, Fourth of July Committee, and Health 

48 






pucation Advisory Committee. New committees included the Andover Arts Council which 
vll oversee the use of the new State Arts Lottery funds, advisory board of the Alco- 

L Safety Action Program, and the Committee on Adult Education whose purpose is to 
I search the needs and availability of programs for retarded adults in the Greater 
fwrence area. 

Council on Aging 

Councils on Aging in Massachusetts were first created by Chapter 495 of the Acts 
«£ 1956 and made part of the General Laws, Section 8B of Chapter 40. As delineated 

i the legislation, the Andover Council on Aging was established for the purpose of 
oordinating or carrying out programs designed to meet the problems of the aging in 

ijjordination with programs of the Department of Elder Affairs and Area Agency on 

King. 



f 



Many Councils throughout the Commonwealth meet this charge through the implemen- 
ution of innovative programs and services responsive to community needs. The areas 
ocompassed include preventive health, information and referral, education, recrea- 
lon, multi-purpose senior centers. Within the centrally located facilities , Councils 
rovide elders with a number of services and social opportunities. 

The Andover Senior Center is located in the Olde Theatre Building at 11 Essex 
fcreet. The Council on Aging provides a number of programs for Andover 's older 
j;sidents . 

Services provided during 1980 were as follows: 

Information and Referral 14,485 

Home Care Services 86 (clients) 

Elderly Health Programs 2,052 

Protective Services 28 

Legal Services 211 

Mental Health 34 

Congregate Meals 12,233 

Home Delivered Meals 6,000 

Transportation 11,271 

Education 874 

Recreation 3,182 

Exercise/Dance 4,080 

Arts and Crafts 1,236 

Parties and Celebration 1,200 

Income Tax Assistance 174 

Total 57,136 

Newsletter Distributed 18,000 

Funding for these programs in Fiscal Year 1980 came from the following sources: 

Town of Andover $37,778.00 

Elder Services of Merrimack Valley 

Home Care Services 68,786.00 

Senior Aides 12,197.00 

Elderly Health Programs 12,311.00 

Protective Services 1,018.00 

Legal Services 3,646.00 

Mental Health 1,498.00 

Department of Elder Affairs 

Council on Aging Grant 1 , 794. 00 

Total $139,028.00 

49 



The Andover Senior Associates, Inc. was formed in 1980 to fund special projects 
of the Council on Aging. The Senior Associates have donated a 16mm projector, ceram: 
kiln, ceramic supplies and have paid for the installation of kitchen cabinets and a 
storage closet for arts and crafts. The monthly newsletter of the Council on Aging 
was printed at no cost to the town by a private printing company. Eighteen thousand 
newsletters were printed for distribution in 1980. 

The Council on Aging continues to see increased participation in all programs 
and services, especially those conducted at the Senior Center. Thanks to a corp of 
over 125 dedicated volunteers, the Friendly Visitor Program, Telephone Reassurance 
Program, class and activity offerings continue to expand. 

Animal Inspection 

The following is a statistical report of the activities of the 
Inspector of Animals for the calendar year 1980. 

No. of dogs quarantined and examined for signs of Rabies 24 

No. of dogs found to have Rabies 

No. of other animals examined for Rabies 5 

No. of animals found to have Rabies 

No. of barns inspected 60 

No. of horses 170 

No. of dairy cattle 73 

No. of beef cattle 17 

No. of swine 496 

No. of goats 20 

No. of sheep 13 



Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center 

The Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center (GLMHC) recently completed its first year 
as a federally-designated Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center. The Center 
provided a wide range of mental health services to the residents of Andover. These 
services include: 

- Emergency evaluations for individuals in crisis situations. 

- Evaluation of the need for hospitalization. 

- Counseling and psychotherapy to individuals, couples, families, and groups. 

- Psychological and psychiatric evaluations. 

- A Medication Clinic for patients referred for psychotropic medication. 

- Special services to children, adolescents and the elderly. 

- Follow-up services for individuals requiring long term care. 

- Professional consultation to schools and public agencies. 

- Educational presentations, seminars, and workshops. 

The GLMHC is staffed by a full range of mental health professionals including 
psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, counselors, and expressive 
therapists. 

In October, 1980, the Center opened a new office at 4 Park Street, where it can now 
reach Andover residents more effectively by delivering many of the services at this 
site. Staff mobility also allows for contact in settings outside the offices. 

During the period January through December, 1980, the GLMHC provided services to 
over 900 Andover residents in addition to consultation available throughout the year 
to the school system. 



! 






50 






Greater Lawrence Psychological Center 



:q.e services provided by Greater Lawrence Psychological Center during 1980 fall into 
J ve general categories. A description of these services is provided below. 

I rect Clinical Service in the Schools 

(nthia Frankel, staff psychologist, led three counseling groups at West Elementary 
Shool and a peer counseling program at West Junior High School. In addition, Ms. 
lankel provided psychological evaluations for CORE assessments throughout the 1979- 
]i80 school year. 

Tug Abuse Consultation and Education 

Tree staff members provided consultation and workshops on drug abuse throughout the 
yar. Karen Luber, M.S.W., conducted inservice training and classroom presentations 
ti drug effects. Gary Goldman, staff psychologist, also presented to classroom 
foups. Ms. Frankel worked with peer counselors on the treatment of drug abuse and 
janned an educational program on this treatment for Health Education classes at the 
Igh School. In addition, Ms. Frankel met for several months with The Andover Task 
I»rce on Drug and Alcohol Abuse; co-led a program for parents and high school stu- 
onts on substance abuse; and participated in a panel discussion on drug abuse in 
rite community. 

Ommunity Services 

]i addition to involvement with The Task Force on substance abuse, Ms. Frankel met 
? th The Youth Needs Study Committee. She and Joe Cotton, Executive Director, also 
Bit with community residents regarding crisis intervention services needed by the 
1>wn. 

C inical Supervision 

fciillis Yardley, A.C.S.W., met with several adjustment counselors and guidance coun- 
selors throughout the year to provide clinical supervision. The clinical issues most 
l.cused upon involved working with the students' families and prompting cooperative 
fid supportive efforts between the family and school personnel. 

I rect Clinical Service at The Agency 

Adover residents were seen at the agency in individual, family and group therapy. 
r ie majority of clients from Andover were seen in family therapy. Hillary Turkewitz, 
li.D., has been working with school personnel to facilitate the referrals of children 
vth problems in school. 

| Public Works 

ENGINEERING 



Field surveys, construction plans and documents, competitive bidding, field 
layouts and on-site inspections were provided for the following list of projects 

1. 3,500 lineal feet of subdrain in Essexwood subdivision under bond 
forfeited by developer. 

2. Site work, grades and fence for the salt shed at the Town Yard. 

3. 2,974 feet of new surface water drainage lines of various sizes 
in the following streets: Chandler Road, Haggetts Pond Road, 
Argilla Road, Bailey Road. 

4. Additional parking at Andover High School near the gym (55 spaces). 

51 



5. Handicap Ramp at the Memorial Hall Library. 

6. School Zone lights at West Elementary School. 

7. Renovations for the new quarters for library in Ballardvale. 

8. Highway Guard Rail. 

9. Demolition of Merrimack Card Clothing building on Buxton Court and 
Ballardvale Community Center Building. 

A considerable amount of time was spent working with the consultants on the 
finish of River Road Reconstruction near Rte 93, School Street area drainage con- 
struction, Andover Street drainage plans and the finish of the water transmission 
main construction. 

For the Planning Board preliminary and definitive plans for 8 subdivisions of 
land with a total of 145 lots were reviewed to determine conformance with its rules 
and regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. Particula 
problems in the subdivisions under construction were reviewed with the Construction 
Inspector. Legal descriptions for easements and roadway layouts were checked befor 
they were filed in the Registry of Deeds. 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where necessary for the 
projects outlined above and for proposed projects. 

The Town was represented in engineering matters with the Federal, State and 
County governments, principally concerning TOPICS on Main Street, Tewksbury Street, 
R.R. Bridge reconstruction and Chapter 90 construction. 

Many Town citizens and others assisted in obtaining information about existing 
utilities, street layouts, industrial sites and other general information. 

The engineering records of theTown were maintained and updated and other Town 
departments were aided in obtaining this information. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of underground utilitiei 
were issued through this division. 

The engineering division of Public Works consists of three full-time employees 
with one civil engineering student employed on a part-time basis. 

WATER 

The water division of the Department of Public Works consists of 18 full-time 

employees including the superintendent. The division is reponsible for Ithe supply, ; 

treatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The major components 
of the water system are as follows: 

Supply: Haggetts Pond 

Fish Brook 
Merrimack River 
Abbott Well 

Treatment: Water Filtration Plant 

Chlorination Facilities - Fish Brook 

Pumping Stations: Water Filtration Plant 

Fish Brook 
Bancroft Road 
Abbott Well 



52 



Distribution System: 



Distribution Water Mains 



Storage Reservoirs: 
Bancroft Road 
Prospect Hill 
Wood Hill 

173 Miles 



Since the dedication in October 1974 of the Water Filtration Plant at Haggetts 
Pond, the staff has conducted numerous tours for students in all grades of the 
Andover school system, colleges throughout New England, various local clubs, and 
visitors from all over the world. 



The total water pumped to the system from January 1, 1980 through December 31, 
1980 was 1,486,914,000 gallons. During the same period a total of 861,394,000 
gallons of water was diverted from other sources. The average daily pumping was 
4,073,737 gallons with a maximum day of 9,136,000 gallons occurring on June 27, 1980 



Repairs : 



Hydrants : 



Water Meters 



House service leaks repaired - 20 

Water mains breaks repaired - 11 

Hydrants repaired or replaced - 6 

New hydrants installed - 13 



New meters installed 
Old meters replaced 
Water meters repaired and 

tested 
Field meters serviced 

(spring and fall) 

Additions to the water system by acceptance of streets: 



- 417 

- 95 

- 12 

- 12 



Buchan Road 
Monahan Lane 
Brady Loop 
Old Schoolhouse Road 



750 feet of 8" C.I. D.I. Pipe 

700 feet of 8" C.I. D.I. Pipe 

3600 feet of 8" C.I. D.I. Pipe 

900 feet of 6" C.I. D.I. ipe 



During the summer of 1980, the water main contract in the Shawsheen area was 
completed by Grandview Contracting Inc., and the water main contract in the Ballard- 
vale area was completed by A. Susi Construction, Inc., of Milton, Massachusetts. 

For the twelve months of 1980, the division received $518.00 for special 
services. Also, 28,062,550 gallons of water was sold to the Town of North Reading, 
and 228,000 gallons of water was sold to the Town of Tewksbury. 

SEWER 

The sewer division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for the 
operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale Street in 
Ballardvale, Bridle Path Road, West Elementary School, Riverina Road in Shawsheen 
and the entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes 62 miles of sanitary sewers and 4,121 connections. 
The Riverina Road pumping station discharges by means of a force main through the 
City of Lawrence to the Merrimack River. The raw sewage discharge from Riverina 
Road is collected and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's Regional 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

In the past year, the sewer division freed 15 blockages in sewer mains and 48 
private sewer services. Approximately 150 calls for assistance from homeowners with 
private sewer service problems were answered. 

The sewer maintenance program continues to show increasingly good results, with 
weekly and monthly inspections of certain sections of sewers that because of rela- 
tively flat slopes and low velocity cause plugging problems. 



53 



During the summer of 1980, the Lowell Street Sewer was completed by T.D. 
Sullivan & Sons" of Newton Center, Mass. 

During the twelve months of 1980, the sewer division received $462.00 for 
special services. 

HIGHWAY 

During the period of June 16, 1980, through July 17, 1980, (a period of 14 
days) the below listed streets were treated with asphalt and sand for a total of 
approximately 14 miles: 



Archer Lane 

Beacon Street 

Birch Road 

Brentwood Road 

Chatham Road 

Chandler Road (part of) 

Cross Street 

Embassy Lane 

Glen Cove Road 

Haven Drive 

High Plain Road 

Ivy Lane 

Kirkland Road 



Lupine Road 
Meadowbrook Drive 
Oriole Drive 
Random Lane 
River Road 
Sagamore Drive 
Sequoia Lane 
Sandybrook Circle 
Smithshire 
Sheridan Road 
Thresher Road 
Toby Lane 
West Parish Drive 



Harding, Corbett and Sherbourne Streets were resurfaced with an overlay of 
bituminous concrete. 

Clean Up 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleanir 
of all streets after the winter sanding. One sweeper starts each morning at 5:00 
A.M. prior to the awakening of the business community. 

Leaf Pickup 

This service was discontinued. 



Inspection 

The highway division assists the engineering division on its inspection of the 
conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men aid equipment for all other divisions when needed. 

Sidewalks 

Sidewalks were maintained as required. 

Storm Drains 

Storm drains, brooks and catch basins were cleaned and kept free of all debri! 
Some 86 basins were repaired; deterioration and damage had been caused mostly by 
frost and icy conditions during thewinter season. 

Snow and Ice Control 

The highway division with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of 
the Public Works Department is also responsible for snow removal and ice control 
including flood control for all town roads. We were fortunate for a very mild 
winter season. 



54 



The snowfall was as follows: 

October 1979 - 2 inches 

December 1979 - 3 inches 

January 1980 - 3 inches 

February 1980 - 5 inches 

March 1980 - 7 inches 

Total 20 inches 

J ublic Works Improvements 



A new salt shed was constructed at the Lewis Street yard. Funds were provided 
)y the Commonwealth of Massachusetts assisted by Town funds. 

An existing generator received from Civil Defense and converted and attached 
o the existing garage This will enable limited availability of energy power in 
he event of a power breakdown. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 



This division of the Public Works Department is vested with the responsibility 
>f providing complete maintenance for all Public Works Department vehicles, of the 
various divisions that include engineering, water, sewer, highway, parks, forestry, 
solid waste and cemetery. The Community Service Department and Haven vehicles are 
<ilso serviced by this division. 

This division maintains a supply of fuel (diesel fuel and gasoline) including 
Lubricants for the above-mentioned divisions in addition to providing gasoline for 
the School Department. As prescribed by statutory law, all vehicles must be 
inspected bi-annually and necessary repairs are accomplished in order to maintain 
|etate standards for safety. 

An inpsection station, approved and licensed, was granted by the Registry of 
IMotor Vehicles and is in effect for the first time as of April, 1980. 

This division is also responsible for the acquisition of replacement vehicles. 
During this period $95,900.00 was approved in the budget for the replacement of 
worn out vehicles. One catch basin cleaner, one sidewalk tractor, one pickup truck 
and one dumptruck were negotiated for replacement. 

PARKS 

During the early spring, the park division repaired and painted all benches 
and portable bleachers as well as all 12 backstops for baseball and Softball. 

The High School baseball, the Junior High and Elementary School fields were 
raked, rolled and marked for each game. The running tracks and soccer fields were 
prepared for each meet. 

Fertilizer and seed, as needed, were applied in the spring and fall on all 
town grassed areas. Each week over 100 acres are cut during the growing season. 

Spraying was done, where required, to control infestation of Japanese Beetles. 

This summer, the roof of the park building was replaced. 

The sprinkler system was in operation during the hot summer months on the 
varsity football, and field hodkey field. 

This year, 24 town grass plot areas were mowed by private contractors during 
the growing season. 

The park personnel return to the highway division during the winter season for 
maintenance of highways and sidewalks and snow and ice control. 

55 



FORESTRY 

i 
During 1980, the forestry division removed 169 trees ranging in size from 10" I 
to over 30" in diameter. Thirty-four of the trees were removed with contractor 
assistance. 

The division planted 85 trees consisting of the following varieties: green &i 
ginko, callery pear, London planetree, column Norway maple, white pine, dwarf 
Japanese maple, flowering cherry, and dogwood. 

The division spent approximately 18% of available time pruning. Pruning 
consists of street-by-street pruning, problem tree pruning, storm repairs, flat- 
clearing whole streets of undesirable vegetation, removing sight distance obstruc- 
tions at intersections and curves thus providing better visability over distances, 
and maintenance of the shrub beds in Central Park. 

Spray operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using approv 
pesticides and methods. Operations included applications of both herbicides and 
insecticides. Herbicides were used to control weeds along guardrails, poison ivy, 
curbside weeds, and weeds in the central park shrub beds. Insecticides were used 
to control elm bark beetles, elm leaf beetles, hornets, wasps, and gypsy moths. 
For the first time in many years, gypsy moth infestations were heavy enough to 
warrant spray controls. A biological agent, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), was 
sprayed on roadside public shade trees in those areas , approximately one-fourth of 
the town, where gypsy moths threatened the health of the trees. 

The mowing of roadside weeds is done by private contractors, and the division 
mows individual problem areas and some town-owned fields. During the winter months, 
the division continues with its shade tree maintenance duties and also plows snow 
for the Highway Division when needed. 



CEMETERY 

Spring Grove Cemetery is located in the southwesterly part of the town with th 
principal entrance at the junction of Abbot Street and Spring Grove Road. 

The cemetery contains about 60 acres of land, of which 14 acres are undevelope 
It has been planned and developed to keep its natural beauty. Lots are available 
to meet all requirements. 

Routine work consists of cutting the grass, trimming around the monuments, 
raking and cleaning up the grounds, cutting the brush, pruning of shrubs and trees, 
preparing of new gravesites, filling in sunken graves, grading and seeding of 
winter graves, applying lime and fertilizers, keeping roads clear of snow, inter- 
ments, disinterments and cementing of foundations for monuments. During snowstorm 
cemetery personnel operate trucks and plows for the highway division. 

During the 12 month period, 29 new lots were sold and there were 81 interment 
Perpetual care payments from the above and the conversion of an older lot from the 
payment by one lot owner added $9,592.00 to the Perpetual Care Fund. 

A total of $18,674.00 was received from the sale of lots, interments, founda- 
tions and from lots under annual care. These general receipts and the income from 
the Perpetual Care Fund were turned over to the Town Treasurer. 



56 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 



The average daily flow to the plant during 1980 was 25.0 mgd (million gallons 
»er day) and Andover's flow was approximately 3 mgd or 12 percent of the total 
lant flow. 

Plant Operation: 

1) Screening Removal - 2,668 cubic feet of debris. 

2) Primary Sedimentation 

Remove settleable organics, grit and floatable material. 

Detention Time - 4 hours 

Removal 

33.1% of the BOD (Biological Oxygen Demand) 

55.7% of the SS (Suspended Solids) 

3) Activated Sludge System (Biological Treatment) 

Removal 

76.7% of BOD 
60.6% of SS 

4) Overall Plant Removal 

84.4% of BOD 
83.2% of SS 

5) Solids Handling 

Total Sludge (dry) 6,273 tons 

Total Sludge Processing Cost $50.90/ton. 

6) Septage Handling 

Provisions are available at the plant to accept septage for treatment. 
Septage disposal from member communities is charged at a rate of $15 
per load and Massachusetts non-member communities $18 per load. 
Salem, New Hampshire, is. charged a rate of $25 per load. In 1980, the 
plant received 1,604 loads from within the district and 2,521 loads from 
outside the district. 

General studies are underway in order to determine the feasibility of develop- 
ment of low-head hydroelectric power from the plant's effluent and land disposal of 
ts sludge. 



Sale of Property 



Following surplus materials were sold during the year: 

Misc. Scrap Iron - $ 271.90 NCR Bookkeeping Machines 

Misc. Chairs - $ 50.00 (to Voke School - $ 1.00 

Multilith - $ 600.00 Phys Ed. Equipment - $330.00 

Sale of Timber - $4,288.20 Mounted Generators - $500.00 



57 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1980 



Ahern, John F. 
Andersen, Herbert H.,Jr. 
Anderson, C. Henry 
Ardini, John N. 
Bartlett, Robert E.,Jr. 
Batchelder, Trudie L. 
Belloir, Marjorie L. 
Benson, Evelyn M. 
Bernardin, Daniel C. 
Berube, Therese M 
Birnbach, Bernice 
Bissett, James 
Bloom, David M. 
Bourque, Raymond 
Broaddus, Laura 
Brown, Elaine D. 
Bruno, William P. 
Buck, David T. 
Budd, Mark 
Bullard, Sarah B. 
Burgess, Jane K. 
Burke, John L. 
Campbell, Michael S. 
Campion, David G. 
Carlisle, Mary M. 
Carlton, Cheryl R. 
Carroll, Alan D. 
Carter, Cynthia Lois 
Cederberg, Ella A. 
Chakarian, Louis M. 
Clark, Robert L. 
Clotworthy, Frances P. 
Collins, Ruth E. 
Collins, Lawrence N.,Jr. 
Collins, Thomas 
Comeau, Joseph E. 
Conlon, Barbara Jo 
Coolidge, Alden P. 
Coombes, Richard W. 
Coppeta, Robert A. 
Cox, Vincent T. 
Cronin, Kathleen J. 
Culpon, Phyllis 
Currie, Robert J. 
Dailey, Floranne 
Damore, Anthony J., Jr. 
DeAngelis, Christine C. 
Delaney, Alcea L. 
Demaso , James M. 
Derba, Robert M. 
DiTroia, Anthony J., Jr. 
Dolan, Thomas G. , Jr. 
Doran , Dennis J. 
Dowd, Rita K. 
Dumont , John P . 
Eaton, James H. , IV 
Ely, John J. 
Enos, Richard W. 
Evans, Catherine G. 
Evans, Robert 
Fahey, James R. 



Food Service Director 6 

Design Engineer 140 

Engineer 14 

Manager Date Systems 23 

Production Manager 19 

Houseparent 215 

Housewife 5 

IRS Tax Examiner 6 

College Student 22 

Seasonal Clerk 2 

Legal Secretary 2 

Foreman 34 

Salesman 11 

Painting Foreman 13 

Unemployed 77 

Housewife 3 

Self-Employed 5 

Custodian 42 

Assembler 74 

Part-Time Teacher 107 

Homemaker 91 

Consultant 64 

Salesman 6 

Salesman 76 

Housewife 27 

Claims Representative 5 

Structural Draftsman 20 

Senior Clerk 373 

Bookkeeper 24 

Truck Driver 58 

Senior Vice President 192 

Housewife 159 

Retired 406 

Sales Manager 9 

Engineering (Sr. Comp . ) 1 

Mgr. Data Processing Ctr. 88 

Clerical Clerk 17 

Quality Control 20 

Textile Manufacturing 110 

Senior Engineer 112 

Chemical Salesman 7 

Real Estate 8 

R.N. 17 

Retired 38 

Merchant 21 

Data Editor 432 

Owner/R.N. 105 

Tumor Registrar 42 

Supervisor 2 

Self-Employed 7 

Student 1 

Auto Service Manager 416 

Section Hand 2 

Quotation Specialist 15 

Truck Driver 12 

Survey Man 80 

Warehouse Manager 174 

Police Officer 12 

Layout Design Artist 10 

Unemployed 75 

Dist. Manager 13 



Oriole Drive 
High Plain Road 
Rennie Drive 
Brady Loop 
Juniper Road 
Lowell Street 
Smithshire Estate 
Westwind Road 
Reservation Road 
Hawthorne Circle 
Bellevue Road 
Pasho Street 
Dean Circle 
Wildwood Road 
Bartlet Street 
Glenwood Road 
Iroquois Avenue 
Red Spring Road 
Memorial Circle 
Highland Road 
Lowell Street 
Haverhill Street 
Joseph Street 
Maple Avenue 
Strawberry Hill Ro; 
Porter Road 
Elm Court 
South Main Street 
Lowell Street 
Bellevue Road 
Holt Road 
Holt Road 
Longwood Drive 
Olympia Way 
Standish Circle 
Poor Street 
York Street 
Rock 0' Dundee Road 
Cross Street 
Greenwood Road 
York Street 
Punchard Avenue 
Brookfield Road 
Pearson Street 
Enfield Drive 
South Main Street 
Cross Street 
Wild Rose Drive 
Mitton Circle 
Whispering Pines 
Ivanhoe Lane 
Lowell Street 
Buchan Road 
Cabot Road 
Foster Pond Road 
Argilla Road 
Jenkins Road 
Tilton Lane 
Ivy Lane 

Spring Grove Road 
Carmel Road 



58 



Fantini, George J., Jr, 
Finley, Carl J. 
Fionte, Rita M. 
Fitzgerald, David J. 
Fogg, Connie May 
Folley, Herbert R. 
Foster, Susan E. 
Freitas, Edward 
Frishman, Ruth B. 
Frost, Norman C. 
Gall, Keith W. 
Gaudet , Donald E. 
Germano, Josephine 
Gilcreast, Harriet J. 
Gioia, Alexander P. 
Gildea, Sonia J. 
Giuliani, James A. 
Goldman, Paul R. 
Gordon, Miriam Kate 
Grant, M. Scott 
Grecoe, John, III 
Greenberg, Maxine B. 
Guerin, Katherine P. 
Guillet, Arthur 0. 
Haddad, Charles C. 
Hale, Elizabeth A. 
Hale, Philip P. 
Hall, Paul H. 
Hall, Elizabeth P. 
Hanlon, Mark C. 
Harper, Polly 
Harris, Kevin W. 
Harris, Rosemary 
Hevehan, Colleen A. 
Hatfield, Harley F. 
Hein, Matthew N. 
Higgins, Carol B 
Hillman, Douglas J. 
Hinckley, Joseph B. 
Hindman, Marion D. 
Hinds, Mark F. 
Hogarty, Stephen J. 
Hopley, Ronald 
Howes, Phyllis E. 
Hoyt , Marlene L 
Hughes, Scott 
Hughes, Walter 
Hunt, Norman T. 
Jacobson, Charles 
Jaffe, Saul W. 
Johanson, Edith A. 
Jones, Philip S. 
Joyce, F. Leo 
Katsiane, Mary Ann 
Katsiane, Richard 
Kavanagh, Antoinette M 
Kearn, Herbert F. 
Kelleher, Jeremiah 
Kennedy, Virginia C. 
King, Charles H. , II 
King, Thomas E. , Jr. 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1980 



Loan Officer 30 

Carpenter 96 

Retired 127 

Sales 322 

Dispatcher 50 

Retired 75 

Housewife 425 

Production Manager 5 

Clerk/Bookkeeper 14 

Vice President 31 

Insurance Adjustor 5 

Fork Lift Operator 44 

Hairdresser 7 

Housewife 243 

Superintendent 10 

Manager 5 

Manufacturing Supervisor 3 

Furniture Mfgr. 8 

Student 16 

Student 47 

Packer 8 

Homemaker 46 

Waitress 54 

Tool & Die Maker 28 

Insurance Sales Rep 50A 

Quality Control 9 

Free Lance Artist Adv. 147 

Outside Sales D2 

Accounting Dept . 79 

Customer Service Rep. 39 

Sales Rep. 128 

Sr . Software Engineer 34 

Senior Clerk Typist 11 

Collating Clerk 17 

Technical Sales Rep. 11 

Student 12 
Professional Journal Editor 23 

General Sales Manager 13 

Unemployed 43 

At Home 10 

Landscape 207 

Sales Representative 95 

Manufacturing Engineer 56 

Crossing Guard 11 

Mortgage Service Officer 2 

Mechanic 42 

Self-Employed 13 

Photo-typesetting 7 

System Technician 49 

Representative 6 

Retired 28 

Registered Pharmacist 8 

Self-Employed 3 

Wireperson 128 

Edging Inspector 128 

Housewife 8 

Truck Driver 146 

Prod. Cont . Manager 149 

Office Clerk 111 

Mech. Assemb. 24 

Planning Engineer 14 



Cutler Road 
Woburn Street 
Salem Street 
River Road 
Summer Street 
Essex Street 
South Main Street 
Buchan Road 
Castle Heights Road 
Lowell Street 
Hampton Lane 
County Road 
Wabanaki Way 
Highland Road 
Flint Circle 
Thresher Road 
Clinton Court 
Joyce Terrace 
Florence Street 
School Street 
Florence Street 
Sagamore Drive 
Maple Avenue 
Maple Avenue 
Washington Park Drive 
Harding Street 
River Road 
Colonial Drive 
Tewksbury Street 
Linwood Street 
Main Street 
Summer Street 
Dorset Circle 
Partridge Hill Road 
Charlotte Drive 
Burton Farm Drive 
Brechin Terrace 
Strawberry Hill Road 
Elm Street 
Castle Heights Road 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Chestnut Street 
Salem Street 
Greenwood Road 
Punchard Avenue 
Central Street 
Lockway Road 
Alderbrook Road 
River Street 
Hawthorne Circle 
Lincoln Street 
Maple Avenue 
Sandy Brook Circle 
Andover Street 
Andover Street 
Washington Avenue 
Chandler Road 
Haverhill Street 
Main Street 
Gray Road 
Downing Street 



59 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1980 



Kokinos , Spero G. 
Krauson , Stephanie C. 
Krigbaum, Mary A. 
Krikorian, Nicholas C, 
Krikorian, Rose 
Krochmal, Ann M. 
Kirk, James C. 
Lalonde, Bernard L. 
Lamb, Sidney E. 
Lambiris, Ellen B. 
Lane, Cyrill S. 
Laquidara, Charles 
Lebowitz, Scott E. 
Lebowitz, Lee 
Lenes, Timothy P. 
Lewis, Bonne 
Lindstrom, Carl A. 
Long, Andrea J. 
Long, Charles E. 
Lyons, John F. , Jr. 
MacBride, Charles H. 
MacDonald, Ruth E. 
MacKay, Elizabeth M. 
Maloof, David 
Mangulis, Elisabeth B. 
Marusich, Zeff 
MacDonald, Paula 
Masters, George E. 
Mathews, Robert L. 
Maxwell, Steven 
McAllister, John B. 
McAvoy, Kenneth J. 
McCarthy, Mary I. 
McDonald, Agnes M 
McKain , James A. 
McKeown , Barbara 
McKew, Howard J. 
Mercer, Ivy 
Meckel, James F. 
Michalosky, Edward J., 
Mitchell, Brian 
Mooney, John, II 
Moody, Janice 
Moran, George S. 
Morehardt , Nancy D.E. 
Morkeski, Maureen 
Morkeski , Nancy 
Moss, George G. 
Muldoon, Arthur F. 
Murgia, Robert D.,Jr. 
Murphy, James T. 
Murphy, Lynnette M. 
Murphy, Marie F. 
Nagle, Mary E. 
Napolitan, Gilberta 
Nichols, Shirley A 
Nicoll, Cecile R. 
O'Connell, Stephen V. 
O'Neill, Robert D. 
Orenstein, Harold D. 
O'Rourke, John E. 



Sr 



CPA 


34 


Housewife 


11 


Housewife 


27 


Layout Machine Operator 


67 


Unemployed 


67 


Housewife 


9 


Prod. Dev , Biochemist 


1 


Advertising Sales Manager 


8 


Supt . of Marble Const. 


10 


Housewife 


15 


Delivery Driver Red Cross 


23 


Self-Employed 


4 


Student 


122 


Census Employee 


122 


Law Student 


3 


Interior Decorator 


7 


Sr . Development Engineer 


37 


Part-time Office Clerk 


109 


Vice-President 


8 


Sr . Facilities Planner 


46 


Part-time Record Keeper 


9 


Housewife 


81 


Winder 


67 


Stockroom Manager 


48 


Registered Nurse 


36 


Program Administrator 


2 


Customer Service Rep 


244 


Conductor 


16 


Unit Director 


20 


Machine Operator 


80 


Retired 


256 


Corporate Controller 


15 


Clerk 


4 


Housewife 


2 


Senior Engineer 


165 


Homemaker 


29 


Engineer 


24 


Retired 


256 


Reliability Engineer 


87 


Ins. Claims Adjustor 


23 


Student 


251 


Musician 


7 


Student 


12 


Exec. Director 


20 


Supervisor 


122 


Supervisor 


88 


Solderer 


55 


Journeyman Electrician 


17 


General Manager 


52 


Student 


8 


Retired 


288 


Case Manager 


12 


Bookkeeper 


288 


Bookkeeper 


77i 


Retired 


10 


Dog Groomer 


501 


Housewife 


17 


Unemployed 


36 


Electronic Test Tech. 


8 


Retail Merchant 


257 


Management Analyst 


30 



Pleasant Street 
Mohawk Drive 
Boutwell Road 
Memorial Circle 
Memorial Circle 
Carriage Hill Road 
Monahan Lane 
Rasmussen Circle 
Lucerne Drive 
Shipman Road 
Salem Street 
Alderbrook Road 
Argilla Road 
Argilla Road 
Hackney Circle 
Kirkland Drive 
Juliette Street 
Main Street 
Yardley Street 
York Street 
Bellevue Road 
Chestnut Street 
Tewksbury Street 
Juniper Road 
Kirkland Drive 
William Street 
South Main Street 
Cross Street 
Linda Road 
Essex Street 
North Main Street 
Bradley Road 
Mercury Circle 
McDonald Circle 
Shawsheen Road 
Farrwood Drive 
Tilton Lane 
North Main Street 
Ballardvale Road 
Suncrest Road 
Highland Road 
Washington Avenue 
Suncrest Road 
Brookfield Road 
Salem Street 
Carmel Road 
Memorial Circle 
Balmoral Street 
Woodland Road 
Canterbury Street 
River Road 
Alderbrook Road 
River Road 
School Street 
Bradley Road 
South Main Street 
Chester Street 
Love joy Road 
Woodcliff Road 
North Main Street 
Pasho Street 



•<; 



60 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1980 



)ta, Mark D. 

3 adva, Henry A. 

5 almer, Lisa 

3 arker, Arthur 

^arker, Marjorie B. 

^ascucci, Paula 

5 asquale, Josephine T. 

^ellerin, Raymond A. 
I^elletier, Esther B. 

D ereira, Richard A. 

3 errault, Geraldine D. 

3 izarro, Candida 

3 owers, Kathleen M. 

D ratt, Susan J. 
l?rout, Terence P. 
l?rovasoli, Elizabeth H. 

lead, William T. 

teilly, Anne M. 

Reynolds, Gerald D. 

Undone, Frank 

tobb, Elizabeth 

tobidoux, Ernest J. 

Robinson, James T. 

Robinson, Wyley G.,111 

toulston, Robert 

Russell, Bruce C. 

Sampiere, Frank N. 

Sampson, Mark 

Sanborn, Edith L. 

Schiller, Gloria J. 

Secord, Frances R. 

Seikunas, Ruth E. 

Sheedy, John J. 

Sheehan, Elizabeth F 

Sheehy, Catherine A. 

Shepard, John A. 

Sherman, Lillian 

Sherman, Natalie L. 

Sherrerd, Alan H. 

Shionis, Charles A. 

Simonelli, Candido 

Skinner, Mary R. 

Skinder, Carolyn F. 

Smith, Arthur W. 

Sodnowsky, Thelma L. 

Sotera, Margaret A. 

Souter, Charles R. 

Spear, Judith 

Spofford, Robin L. 

Stafford, Walter F.,III 

Stahl, Mary F. 

Starkweather, David S. 

Stephens, Whitman G. 

St. Jean, Agnes S. 

St. Jean, George 

Storlazzi, Frances J. 

Struthers, Carleton M 

Stupack, Edward W. 

Suchodolski, Edward 

Suhr, Kenneth C. 

Suter, Diane C. 



Customer Service 160 

Sales Representative 10 

Student 15 

Production Planner 63 

Cafeteria Worker 30 

Instructor 22R 

Salesperson 147 

Compositor 160 

Housewife 38 

Controller 95 

Housewife 31 

Manager/Owner 114 

Dial Facilities Asst . 100 

Student 1 

Lab Technician 13 

Housewife 30 

C.P.A. 30 

State Employee 6 

Technical Director 26 

Equip. Editor 27 

Saleswoman 21 

Tool & Gage Lab Inspector 66 

Manager Container Corp. 40 

Engineer 17 

Senior Buyer 59 

Sales Engineer 89 

Tool/Designer/draftsman 178 

Student 15 

Housewife 56 

Housewife 15 

Housewife 27 

Executive Secretary 21 

Salesman 6 

Housekeeper 60C 

Student 22 

V.P. Sales 11 

Housewife 231 

Housewife 23 

Sales Representative 15 

Sales Manager 36 

Retired 124 

Secretary 67 

Bench Assembler 189 

Sales Representative 47 

Housewife 31 

Housewife 22 

Student 49 

Supervisor 60 

Account Clerk 16 

Staff Scientist 60 

Housewife 43 

Sr . Engineer 14 

Sales Manager 13 

Retired 9 

Art Gallery Technician 53 

Electronic Tester 36 

Software Dev. Manager 16 

Dir of Personnel Rel . 18 

Representative 123 

Plant Engineer 139 

Research Technician 23 



Salem Street 
Hartford Circle 
Johnson Road 
Carmel Road 
Salem Street 
Hidden Road 
Chestnut Street 
River Road 
Farrwood Drive 
High Street 
McKenney Circle 
Love joy Road 
Washington Park Drive 
Tobey Lane 
William Street 
High Street (B'vale) 
Farrwood Drive 
Olympia Way 
Wethersfield Drive 
Rock Ridge Road 
Memorial Drive 
Lowell Junction Road 
Chandler Circle 
High Street 
Bartlet Street 
Burnham Road 
North Street 
Farrwood Drive 
Jenkins Road 
Rennie Drive 
Cheever Circle 
Gould Road 
Lamancha Way 
Washington Park Drive 
Beech Circle 
Tiffany Lane 
Haggetts Pond Road 
Smithshire Estates 
Ballardvale Road 
Wild Rose Drive 
Lovejoy Road 
Walnut Avenue 
High Plain Road 
Rattlesnake Hill Road 
Theodore Avenue 
Kirkland Drive 
Wild Rose Drive 
Colonial Drive 
Balmoral Street 
Bartlet Street 
Dascomb Road 
Charlotte Drive 
Summer Street 
Dufton Road 
Red Spring Road 
Mary Lou Lane 
Hartford Circle 
Nutmeg Lane 
Shawsheen Road 
Hidden Road 
McKenney Circle 



61 



JURY LIST - JUNE 1980 



Sweeney, Anne M. 
Tarbox , Gretchen A. 
Terranova, Anna R. 
Thomas, William R. , Jr. 
Thomson, George P. 
Thorn, Alice R. 
Tibbetts, Paul E. 
Tremblay, Joanne M. 
Turpening, Roger M. 
Vogel, Seymour H. 
Wesolowski , Mary F. 
Wetterberg, Carl R.,Jr. 
Whitworth, Grace M. 
Wills, Geraldine A. 
Wilson, Eric K. 
Winn, Susan H. 
Winters, Gloria 
Worontsoff, Walter G. 
Wright, Robert W. 
Young, Caroline M. 
Young, Christine D. 
Young, Sandra 
Zaharris, Drake C. 
Zajicek, Leo A. 
Ziegenbein, Barbara A. 



Homemaker 285 

Program Associate 18 
Insurance Claims Processor 386 

Supervisor Q.C. 9 

Sales Manager 57 
Part-time Office Secretary 111 

Retired 37 

Customer Service 41 

Research Seismologist 48 

Businessman 15 

Import/Export Agent 10 

Clerk 85 

Housewife 19 

Student 186 

Student 9 

Office Worker 15 

Homemaker 26 

Food Service Director 33 

Engineer 10 

Housewife 96 

Animal Caretaker 13 

Waitress 96 

Student 5 

Retired 72 

Teacher Aide 117 



North Main Street 
Cutler Road 
North Main Street 
Rocky Hill Road 
Haverhill Street 
North Main Street 
Greenwood Road 
Pine Street 
Clark Road 
Birch Road 
Canterbury Street 
Lowell Street 
Johnson Road 
Elm Street 
Hidden Road 
County Road 
Brady Loop 
Balmoral Street 
Bellevue Road 
Argilla Road 
Bellevue Road 
Argilla Road 
Chaise Circle 
Princeton Avenue 
Lovejoy Road 



62 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING, MARCH 24, 1980 



Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, March 10, 1980, the Inhabitants 
of said Town of Andover who are qualified to vote in Elections and Town Affairs 
met and assembled at the designated polling place. All eight precincts: Pre- 
cinct One, Precinct Two, Precinct Three, Precinct Four, Precinct Five, Precinct 
Six, Precinct Seven and Precinct Eight to vote at the Dunn Gymnasium, Andover 
High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 



MONDAY, THE TWENTY-FOURTH DAY OF MARCH : 
to act upon the following articles: 



1980 



at 8:00 o'clock A.M 

ESSEX, SS 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the constables of 
the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town, to meet at the 
time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant, by posting a true and 
attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each schoolhouse and in no less 
than five other public places where bills and notices are usually posted and by 
publication in the Lawrence Eagle Tribune. Said warrants have been posted and 
published fourteen days. 

Willard M. Walsh, Constable 



ARTICLE 1 . 

Took up Article 1. and proceeded to vote for Town Officers. 
The ballot boxes were found to be empty and registered 0000. 
The polls were opened at eight o'clock A.M. and closed at eight o'clock P.M, 
The total number of ballots cast was 3,160 viz: 



Prec . 


1 - 


415 




Prec 


2 - 


417 




Prec. 3 - 428 Prec. 


4 - 


- 424 


Prec 


5 - 


361 




Prec 


6 - 


421 




Prec. 7 - 318 Prec. 


8 - 


- 376 














PRECINCTS 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


MODERATOR FOR ONE YEAR 
* James D. Doherty 






339 


346 


332 


324 


302 


318 


255 


308 


2524 










1 








Michael A. Tyson 




1 


76 


71 


96 


100 


58 


103 


63 


68 


Blanks 

SELECTMAN 

TWO FOR THREE YEARS 




635 



212 


227 


232 


150 


168 


133 


306 


305 


319 



162 134 172 



229 202 219 195 230 

137 160 173 139 169 

337 230 310 191 248 

1 

145 129 140 111 105 



♦Edward M. Harris 
Randolph Lehman-Becker 
♦Gerald H. Silverman 
David Tyson 
Blanks 



1746 
1229 
2246 
1 
1098 



121 


144 


117 


307 


300 


301 


213 


222 


245 


189 


168 


193 



142 190 153 130 143 

300 214 290 206 243 

248 186 229 184 250 

158 132 170 116 116 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
TWO FOR THREE YEARS 

Joseph A. Baglio 
♦Richard E. Neal 
♦Donald W. Robb 
Blanks 



1140 
2161 
1777 
1242 



311 327 318 324 282 322 



2 
102 



90 110 100 78 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 
ONE FOR FIVE YEARS 

251 312 ♦Richard A. Savrann 2447 

1 Joseph Doherty 1 

2 James McGoff 2 
Henry Zussman 2 
George Kelly 1 

99 64 64 Blanks 707 



63 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 24, 1980 



1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


QUESTION 


212 

157 

46 


200 

166 

51 


214 

161 

53 


214 

158 

52 


183 

144 

34 


241 

135 

45 


199 
93 
26 


228 

119 

29 


*YES 

NO 

Blanks 



1691 

1133 

336 

All the foregoing officers were voted for on one ballot and the check lists 
were used. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 1. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 2. 
Number of unused ballots 1186. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1188. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 412. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 2. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 1. Total number of ballots for computer count 415. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 415. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 415. Forrest H. Noyes, WARDEN. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 2. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 1185. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1186. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 414. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 3. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 0. Total Number of ballots for computer count 417. Number of 
defective ballots 1. Number of ballots counted by computer 416. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 417. Fernand J. Lussier, WARDEN. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 3. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 0. 
Number of unused ballots 1175. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1175. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 425. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 3. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 0. Total number of ballots for computer count 428. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 428. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 428. William H. Ammon, WARDEN. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 4. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 0. 
Number of unused ballots 1183. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1183. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 417. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 5. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 2. Total number of ballots for computer count 424. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 424. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 424. Joan A. Dow, WARDEN. 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 5. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 1. 
Number of unused ballots 1240. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1241. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 359. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 1. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 1. Total number of ballots for computer count 361. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 361. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 1. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 361. Stanley A. Preston, WARDEN. 



64 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 24, 1980 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 6. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 0. 
Number of unused ballots 1184. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1184. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 416. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Towk Clerk's Office 4. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 1. Total number of ballots for computer count 421. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 421. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 421. George R. Harris, WARDEN 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 7. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 0. 
Number of unused ballots 1285. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1285. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 315. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 3. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 0. Total number of ballots for computer count 318. Number of 
defective ballots 0. Number of ballots counted by computer 318. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 318. Albert R. Retelle, WARDEN 

REPORT OF WARDEN - PRECINCT 8. March 24, 1980 

Number of votomatic ballots received 1600. Number of spoiled ballots 2. 
Number of unused ballots 1232. Total spoiled and unused ballots 1234. 
Number of ballots machine voted at precinct 366. Number of absentee ballots 
machine voted at Town Clerk's Office 6. Number of absentee ballots received 
via mailing 4. Total number of ballots for computer count 376. Number of 
defective ballots 1. Number of ballots counted by computer 375. Number of 
write-in ballots processed 0. Number of over-voted ballots 0. Grand Total 
for precinct 376. Henry Hopkins, WARDEN 

Police officers on duty in precincts: Lt . Raymond Collins, Philip Froburg, 
Frank Froburg, James Reilly, Richard Caldwell, Robert Fanning, John Milne 
and Kevin Winters. 

After final action on Article One, the said meeting was adjourned by virtue 
of Section 20, Chapter 39 of the General Laws, to Monday April 14, 1980, at 
the Case Memorial Cage, Phillips Academy, at 7:30 P.M. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 

The Check Lists were used at the entrance to the Case Memorial Cage, Phillips 
Academy and showed 738 voters admitted to the meeting. 
The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:35 P.M. 

The opening prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Westy A. Egmont of the South Church 

Salute to the flag was led by Col. Edward M. Harris, followed by musical se- 
lections by the Madrigal Singers under the direction of J. Everett Collins. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 17 Non-voters. 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the auditorium. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was Voted that the Town Counsel Alfred 
L. Daniels be allowed to dispense with the reading of the Warrant, the return 
of service of the Constable, and that he be allowed to refer to the Articles 
by number as they appear in the warrant. 

Plaques were presented to the former Selectman Lawrence J. Sullivan and to 
the former Chairman of the Finance Committee, Charles H. Wesson, Jr. 

ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, two Selectmen for three years, 
two members of the School Committee for three years, one member of the Andover 
Housing Authority for five years, and any other town officers required by law 



65 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 

to be elected by ballot, also to vote on the question: 

Question: "Shall an Act passed by the General Court in the year nineteen 
hundred and seventy-nine entitled 'An Act exempting all po- 
sitions in the department of Public Works of the Town of And- 
over from the provisions of civil service law and rules', be 
accepted ?" 

All the above candidates to be voted for on one ballot, The polls will be 
open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter announced the results of the election on March 
24, 1980 and declared James D. Doherty elected as Moderator and that he had 
previously been sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of that office. 

The Town Clerk also declared the other successful candidates elected to their 
respective offices and that they had been sworn to the faithful performance of 
their offices. 

James D. Doherty Moderator for One Year 

Edward M. Harris Selectman for Three Years 

Gerald H. Silverman Selectman for Three Years 
Richard E. Neal School Committee for Three Years 

Donald W. Robb School Committee for Three Years 

Richard A. Savrann Andover Housing Authority for Five 

Years. 
QUESTION - - - YES — 1691 NO -- 1133 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected 
by ballot. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that Charles F. Dalton be 
elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected town officers for the 
ensuing year. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officials be as follows: 

Town Moderator $100.00 for each Annual Town Meeting 

25.00 for each Special Town Meeting 
except when it falls within the Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Selectmen - Chairman $1,000.00 per year 
Selectmen - Members 800.00 per year. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the 

Town will raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, 

to defray charges and expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, and 

to provide for a Reserve Fund for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 1980 and 
ending June 30, 1981. 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 

111 Town Moderator A. Personal Services $ 125.00 

112 Board of Selectmen A. Personal Services 6,500.00 

B. Other Expenses, including 

$100.00 for out-of-state travel 5,400.00 

121 Town Manager A. Personal Services 53,331.00 

B. Other Expenses, including 

$750.00 for out-of-state travel 17,390.00 

141 Finance Committee A. Personal Services 1,050.00 

B. Other Expenses 9,270.00 



66 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 



146 Data Processing 



151 Town Counsel 



161 Town Clerk 



162 Elections & 

Registrations 

175 Veterans Services 



181 Municipal Buildings 
195 Central Services 



A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses, including 

$400.00 for out-of-state travel 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses, including 

$575.00 for out-of-state travel 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

C. Assistance 

A. Personal Services 

*B. Other Expenses 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 



17,266.00 
41,960.00 

49,000.00 
33,694.00 

6,252.00 

28,813.00 
19,260.00 

28,869.00 

1,721.00 

44,000.00 

37,434.00 
70,448.00 

1,630.00 
35,400.00 



Total Amount Appropriated for General Government and 
Administrative Services 



From Taxation 



$508,813.00 
508,813.00 



The Vote UNANIMOUS 



210 Police 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



220 Fire 



Personal Services :$1 ,085 , 567 . 
less $489,000. from Federal 
Revenue Snaring 
Other Expenses, including 
$1,100.00 for out-of-state travel 

Personal Services 

Other Expenses, including 

$800.00 for out-of-state travel 



596,567.00 



204,430.00 
420,696.00 



Total Amount Appropriated for Public Safety 

From Taxation 
The Vote UNANIMOUS 



107,499.00 
$2,818,192.00 
2,329,192.00 



305 DPW Administration 

310 Sewer 

320 Solid Waste 

321 Highways 
325 Water 



PUBLIC WORKS 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses, including 
$1,600.00 for out-of-state travel 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

C. Gr. Law. Sanitary Dist. 
$552,692. less $395,000. 

from the Sewer System Reserve Fund, 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses, including 
$1,500.00 for out-of-state travel 



62,415.00 

2,050.00 

54,313.00 
55,990.00 



157,692.00 

11,660.00 
332,060.00 

332,675.00 
493,250.00 

318,959.00 
555,565.00 



67 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 



The 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
B. Other Expenses 

Other Expenses 

Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Personal Services $67,236 
less investment income of 
$18,000.00 
B. Other Expenses, including 

$150.00 for out-of-state travel 

Total amount appropriated for Public Works $3,659,502, 

From Taxation 3,246,502 

Vote UNANIMOUS 



330 


Parks 


A 
B 


340 


Forestry 


A 
B 


370 


Vehicle Maint . 


A 
B 


380 


Street Lighting 


A 


390 


Engineering 


A 
B 



395 Spring Grove Cemetery A, 



114,628.00 
37,300.00 

108,256.00 
23,835.00 

47,902.00 
239,950.00 

160,000.00 

60,465.00 
2,275.00 



49,236.00 

25,990.00 
00 
00 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING 

410 Community Dev . & Plan. A. Personal Services 265,872.00 

B. Other Expenses, including 

$1,200.00 for out-of-state travel 76,640.00 

Total Amount Appropriated for Community Development & Planning 

$342,512.00 



The Vote UNANIMOUS 



From Taxation 



342,512.00 



501 Finance and Budget 



510 Town Accountant 



FINANCE AND BUDGET 

A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses, including 
$1,760.00 for out-of-state travel 



A. 
B. 



Personal Services 
Other Expenses 

Total Amount Appropriated for Finance & Budget 

From Taxation 

The Vote UNANIMOUS 



203,859.00 

42,070.00 

75,020.00 
21.065.00 



$ 342,014.00 
342,014.00 



601 Library 



LIBRARY 

A. Personal Services 434,080.00 

B. Other Expenses: $211,011.00 
less Dog License Reimbursements 
of $2,803. and Grants-in-Aid of 
$9,769. and including $650. for 
out-of-state travel 198,439.00 



Total Amount Appropriated for Library 

From Taxation 



$ 645,091.00 
632,519.00 



68 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



650 Andover School Department 



9,640,000.00 



A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses, 
$3,370,000.00 less 
50,000.00 from Public Law 
874 and including $3,000.00 

for out-of-state travel. 3,320,000.00 

660 Gr. Law. Reg. Voc. 148,255.00 

Total Amount Appropriated for Andover School Department: 

$ 13,158,255.00 



From Taxation 



13,108,255.00 



the Vote UNANIMOUS 



710 Community Services 



720 Council of Aging 



COMMUNITY SERVICES 

A. Personal Services 127,285.00 

B. Other Expenses, including 
$350.00 for out-of-state travel 83,110.00 

C. Special Program Account 48,350.00 

D. Gr. Law. Outreach 13,000.00 

E. Gr. Law. Mental Health 18,000.00 

A. Personal Services 24,979.00 

B. Other Expenses 14,610.00 

C. Spec. Program Account 13,000.00 

D. M.V. Home Care 2,200.00 

Total Amount Appropriated for Community Services 

$ 344,534.00 
From Taxation 344,534.00 

The Vote UNANIMOUS 

MISCELLANEOUS 

810 Miscellaneous A. Patriotic/Civil Cel . 

B. Damages Persons/ Prop. 

Total Amount Appropriated for Miscellaneous 9,955.00 

From Taxation 9,955.00 



7,955.00 
2,000.00 



The Vote UNANIMOUS 



DEBT SERVICE 

910 Debt Service A. Interest Expense 

B. Bond Issue Ex. 

C. Bond Redemption 

Total Amount Appropriated for Debt Service 

From Taxation 

The Vote UNANIMOUS 



1,096,893.00 

47,500.00 

2,149,000.00 



3,293,393.00 
3,293,393.00 



UNCLASSIFIED 



920 Insurance 

930 Employee Benefits 

940 Unemployment Comp , 



A. Other Expenses 



387,000.00 

251,000.00 

50,000.00 



69 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 



I 



950 Retirement 



960 Compensation Fund 
970 Reserve Fund 



A. Personal Services 

B. Other Expenses 

C. Contributory Retirement 

D. Non-Contrib. Retirement 



$200,000.00-- $123,462.00 from 
Overlay Reserve and $76,538.00 
from Taxation. 



13,729.00 

810.00 

509,820.00 

91,836.00 

194,000.00 



76,538.00 



Total Amount Appropriated for Unclassified: 

From Taxation 



$1,779,195.00 
1,655,733.00 



The Vote 



UNANIMOUS 



ARTICLE 5 . I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of 
the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1980 in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 17. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 5 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell the 
so-called Cardinal Cushing Gymnasium on Haverhill Street upon such terms and 
conditions as the Selectmen may order. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 6 as printed in the warrant. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia G, 



Curt in . 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate, or transfer 
from available funds the sum of $12,000.00 to reimburse, partially, two former 
Andover School Committee members, Andover citizens, for legal expenses incurred 
in the preparation of their defense in a civil suit brought against them as a 
result of actions they took in the discharge of their duties as members of the 
Andover School Committee. 

On petition of Frederick P. Fitzgerald and others. 

Article 7 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer by 
borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $35,000.00 or 
any other sum for the purpose of constructing playing fields on property owned 
by the Town of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 8 was withdrawn. 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $8,000.00 
any other sum for the purpose of repairs to the bandstand at Central Park. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 



or 



70 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 14, 1980 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 9 as 
printed in the warrant in the amount of $7,500.00 to be raised by taxation. 

A Planning Board Report was read by Paul Teplitz. 

The Vote YES — 286 NO — 73 More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $6,000.00 
or any other sum for the purpose of improving the parking areas at the commuter 
rail stations at Ballardvale and Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 10 was Withdrawn. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to 
adjourn at 10:25 P.M. until Tuesday, April 15, 1980 at 7:30 P.M. in the Case 
Memorial Cage, Phillips Academy. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

The Check Lists were used at the entrance and showed 364 voters admitted 
to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator at 7:46 P.M. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to continue support for Elderly and 
Handicapped Bus Transportation Service and authorize the Selectmen as a matter 
of policy to instruct the Town Manager and/or Andover 's representative to the 
Merrimack Valley Regional Transit Authority to vote and continue a contract 
for this service. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 11 as 
printed in the warrant with the following conditions: 

1) The service shall be for the period July 1, 1980 through June 30, 1981. 

2) The total assessment to the Town of Andover charged to the Cherry Sheet 
not to exceed $15,000.00 for the fiscal year in which the service is 
received. 

3) And, the Town of Andover be permitted to terminate the service or make 
changes in the service design on written notice not to exceed 60 days. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or, by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the 
sum of $2,500.00 or any other sum, for the purpose of supplementing the Elderly 
Lunch Program provided through the Andover School Department under the author- 
ity of Chapter 703 and Chapter 753. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the Council on Aging. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 12 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $2,500.00 to be raised 
by taxation. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer, by taxation, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and approoriate the sum 
of $100,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of undertaking and completing 
repairs and improvements to the Ballardvale Community Center. 

On petition of Sherron Heller and Others. 

Article 13 was Withdrawn. 



71 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $6,000.00 
or any other sum for the purpose of resurfacing with Bituminous concrete the 
Shattuck Parking Area and lining that lot, provided the Town can negotiate a 
long term lease for the lot and that parking will be restricted to those who 
pay a minimal fee for All-day Parking. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the Planning Board. 

Article 14 was defeated. The Vote YES — 126 NO — 244 

Less than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $30,000.00 for the purpose of installing a sewer syphon 
under the Shawsheen River to the Dundee Park Industrial Area. 

On petition of Augustine P. Sheehy and others. 

Article 15 was defeated. The Vote was UNANIMOUS against. Less than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 16 . To act upon the report of the Town Officers. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 16 as 
printed in the warrant . 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise bv taxation, by transfer, 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$7,000.00 to provide special security gates and alarms or other security systems 
at various locations throughout the Town for protection of Town-owned property. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 17 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $8,000.00 to be raised 
by taxation. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate 
the sum of $50,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of erecting a Chain Link 
Fence at the top of the Bancroft Reservoir, installing gates at all entrances 
to the Bancroft School property, and if sufficient funds are available upon com- 
pletion of the above work, construct and install bleachers at the rear of the 
Reservoir, all of said work to be performed according to specifications developed 
by the Director of Public Works and approved by the Superintendent of School. 

On petition of Marie V. Lynch and others. 

Article 18 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer from 
available funds or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum 
of $2,500.00 for seasonal lighting on condition that the Town match contributions 
from the Andover Center Merchants on a dollar-for-dollar basis. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 19 as 
printed in the warrant in the amount of $2,500.00 to be raised by taxation. 

The Vote YES — 372 NO — 40 More than the 2/3 required. 



72 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way, 
Buchan Road, as shown on a plan which was approved by the Andover Planning 
Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled "Subdivision plan of Prospect 
Hill Acres in Andover, Mass., Owner Edward Freitas, 89 Chestnut Street, Andover 
Mass., Engineer Benjamin Chatel, 20 Summer Street, Danvers, Mass.", recorded 
in Northern Essex District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6958. 

On petition of Susan C. Crawford and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 20 as 
printed in the warrant. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Apple Blossom Road, as approved by the Andover Planning Board and layed out 
by the Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled "Definitive Plan, Apple 
BLossom Road (Located off Osgood Street), Owner M.Gates Poore , Engineer: Dana 
F. Perkins of Reading, Mass., Scale 1" = 40 feet, dated July 30, 1976" and 
said plan is recorded with the Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7554. Plan 
and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file 
with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Linda Z. Bryden and others. 

Article 21 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $50,000.00 
or any other sum for the purpose of replacing the motor control center at the 
Fish Brook Pumping Station. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 22 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $35,000.00 to be raised 
by taxation. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

The vote UNANIMOUS More than 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to respond to the serious need to 
reduce its operating costs by discontinuing its water fluoridation program. 

On petition of Helen R. Blake and others. 

Article 23 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to 
enter into a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Public Works Com- 
missioners, the County Commissioners and/or either of them for the construction 
and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 24 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the TOwn will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and/or Town Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time 
to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to Andover by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts or the U.S. Government under any State or Federal 
Grant Program. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 25 as 
printed in the warrant. 

73 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 






ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer of available 
funds and appropriate the sum of $50,000.00 for the purpose of making energy 
conserving repairs and improvements to various municipal buildings and school 
and, further, to authorize the Town Manager to file an application for funds 
for purposes relating in form and manner as may be required by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts and the United States Government and to contract for 
and expend funds, provided, however, that no funds in excess of $25,000.00 
shall be expended until the Town receives approval for a Grants-in-Aid in the 
amount of $25,000.00 from either the Federal or State Agencies for the purposi 
of making such repairs or improvements. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 26 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $50,000.00 from avail- 
able funds. 



A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz 






ARTICLE 27. The following advisory questions are presented to the members of 
the Annual Town Meeting to assist the Facilities Maintenance Study Subcommitt* 
of the Board of Selectmen, the School Committee and the Finance Committee in 
the development of their recommendation to their respective Boards regarding 
the repair and improvement of Town and School Facilities and the funding 
therefor : 

1- Shall the Board of Selectmen, School Committee, respective 
administrations and the Finance Committee work to establish 
a centralized maintenance, repair and improvement staff for 
the care of all Town and School buildings and grounds ? 

2- Shall there be submitted to the Annual Town Meeting appro- 
priation and funding articles for various facility improvements 
renovations, repairs and maintenance items each having an 
estimated cost in excess of $10,000.00 as may apply to Town 
and School buildings and grounds ? 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded paragraph 1 only of Article 27 was 
VOTED in the affirmative as an Advisory Question. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing 
and appropriate the sum of $425,000.00 for the purpose of undertaking the 
following school building improvements and repairs: 
Roofing Projects: West Elementary $260,000 

Shawsheen Elementary 65,500 

Bancroft Elementar y 62,000 

387,500 

Various floor coverings in all 
school buildings 37, 500 

425,000 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the School Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 28 as 
printed in the warrant exclusive of floor coverings, in the amount of $387,500 
to be raised by taxation. 

The vote YES — 453 NO — 20 More than 2/3 required. 

A Report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride. 



74 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, 
Section IV, B. , Table of Use Regulations by inserting the following sub- 
section 42A. : 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB IG IA ID 
42A. Kennel for the keeping BA BA BA N N N N N N N 

of four (4) or more dogs 
over the age of six (6) 
months for the purposes 
of hunting, exhibiting, 
dog shows, field and 
obedience trials or as pets. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 29 was defeated. The Vote YES — 189 NO — 187 
Less than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, Section 11 
of the Town By-Laws by striking out Section N and substituting the following: 

N. Fees 

(a) The fees for dog licenses shall be as follows: $4.00 for a 
male dog and $6.00 for a female dog unless the female dog 
has been spayed, in which case the fee shall be $4.00. Said 
fees are subject to all other conditions as set forth in 
MGLA, Chapter 140, Section 139. 

(b) Any non-licensed dog impounded by the canine control officer 
or others duly authorized under the provisions of Article XII 
Section 11, D, found to be without mandated vaccinations, shall 
be vaccinated by a licensed veterinarian and the owner shall 
be charged the sum of $9.00. 

(c) Any owner whose dog is held under the provisions of Article 
XII, Section 11,D, shall be charged the sum of $10.00 when 
found necessary to euthanize said dog. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the Town amend Article 
XII, Section 11 of the Town By-Laws by striking out Section N and substituting 
the following. 

N. Fees. 

(a) The fees for dog licenses shall be as follows: $4.00 for a 
male dog and $6.00 for a female dog unless the female dog 
has been spayed, in which case the fee shall be $4.00. Said 
fees are subject to all other conditions as set forth in 
MGLA, Chapter 140, Section 139. 

(b) Any non-licensed dog impounded by the canine control officer 
or others duly authorized under the provisions of Article XII 
Section 11, D, found to be without mandated vaccinations, shall 
be vaccinated by a licensed veterinarian and the owner shall 
be charged the sum of $9.00. 

(c) Any owner whose dog is held under the provisions of Article 
XII, Section 11, D, shall be charged the sum of $10.00 when 
found necessary to euthanize said dog. 

Article 30 passed by a majority vote. A Quorum was present. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of $6,500.00 
for the purpose of purchasing and installing flashing lights or other appro- 
priate traffic control signals according to such specifications as may be 

75 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

developed by the Director of Public Works and approved by the Chief of Police 
to be located on Beacon Street near the West Elementary School for control oi|i 
traffic proceeding in both directions. 

On petition of Verna R. Friese and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 31 in the amount of $6,000.00 from available funds. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride. 

The vote UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept paragraphs cj and f J , 
Subdivision 4, Section 20, Chapter 32 of the General Laws which provide that 
the Town Accountant be compensated for services rendered in the active admin- 
istration of the Town Retirement System in an amount not less than 200 nor 
more than 3,000 dollars per annum and shall be payable from the expense fund 
of the system (paragraph cj ) and that the Town Treasurer be compensated for 
services rendered as custodian of the funds of the Retirement System provided 
that the compensation shall not be more than $3,000.00 per annum and shall be 
payable from the expense fund of the system (paragraph f J ) . 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 32 as 
printed in the warrant. 






ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from available 
funds and appropriate the sum of $70,980.00 for highway improvements, the Tow 
to be reimbursed by the Commonwealth and the County as the law may permit; to 
authorize the Town to acquire necessary drainage easements by gift, by purcha 
or by seizure by right of eminent domain. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 33 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $49,000.00 from availab 
funds. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS . More than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section IV. B. of the Zonin 
By-Law (Table of Use Regulations) by striking out item 34A in its entirety an 
substituting the following therefor: 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB IG IA ID 
34A . General removal of soil, 

loam, sand, gravel or peat 

subject to the provisions 

of Sec. VI. E. 1.1 NNNNNNNNBSBS 



Inserted by the Board of Selectmen 
Article 34 was withdrawn. 






ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law Section 
II (Definitions) by adding the following item #6A : 

6A. Earth removal : Soil, loam, sand, peat, gravel, rock, 
and other naturally occurring materials found in or 
upon the ground. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 35 was withdrawn. 



76 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law Section 
VI (Other Requirements) by striking out subsection E (Removal of Material) in 
its entirety and replacing the following therefor: 

E. Removal of Earth Material 

No person shall remove from any parcel of land, earth material 
except from land in public use or public ownership, for purposes 
which are not in conformity with the intent and purposes of this 
By-Law. The removal of earth material shall be in accordance 
with one of the following procedures: 

1.1 General Permit 

a. For commercial earth material removal operations, a Special 
Permit must be obtained from the Board of Selectmen, after 

a public hearing, at which time all interested persons shall 
be given an opportunity to be heard. The time and place of 
this Public Hearing shall be published in a newspaper of 
general circulation in the Town and parties in interest 
shall be notified pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L. 
Chapter 40A, Section 11, all at the applicant's expense. 

b. Before granting a Special Permit, the Board of Selectmen 
shall give due consideration to the place from which it is 
proposed to remove earth material, to the general character 
of the neighborhood surrounding such location and to the 
effect of the proposed removal on such neighborhood, to the 
amount of noise, dust and vibration likely to result from the 
proposed removal, to the extent depth and contour of the lo- 
cation and surrounding neighborhood from which removal is 
proposed, to the general safety of the public on the public 
ways giving access to and in the immediate vicinity of such 
location and to the use to which such location has been put 
prior to the application for a Permit. A determination shall 
be made as to the existence of any other gravel pit in the 
close vicinity of the proposed location, the existence of 
which shall normally be considered an inhibiting factor in 
granting the proposed Permit. No permit granted by the Board 
of Selectmen shall be valid for a period in excess of three 
years from its date of issue. 

c. As part of and set forth in such Permit shall be the restriction 
forbidding excavation to a depth below the mean grade of an ad- 
jacent serving street, in the immediate vicinity of the street. 
No excavation shall be such as to alter the direction of a 
watercourse or to cause surface waters to gather as in a sump 

or swale. In addition, the Selectmen shall impose and set forth 
in the Permit such other restrictions andconditions as they deem 
reasonable and in the public interest, including but not limited 
to the following: 

1. the duration of time during which the Permit may 
be exercised; 

2. the extent, depth and contour of the area of removal; 

3. the grade of the slope of the banks of the area of removal; 

4. the proximity of such operations to any public way; 

5. the hours of the day during which such operations may be 
permitted; 

6. the hours of the day during which vehicles may be loaded 
with earth material, and during which such loaded vehicles 
may be permitted to leave such location; 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

7. the use of covers over the earth material loaded in vehicles 
for removal from the area; 

8. the shoring and reinforcement of the banks of any excavation; 

9. the placement of topsoil and the replanting of the area of 
removal and screening the same from public view; 

10. requirements for the control of dust and other airborne 
material ; 

11. requirements for the control of erosion and sedimentation; 

12. requirements for the control of access to the site; and 

13. requirements for the control of drainage and stormwater runoff. 

1.2 Earth Material removal incidental to Development and Construction 

a. When, in the opinion of the Planning Board, it is deemed necessary: 
to remove earth material from the site of a proposed subdivision, 
the Board shall approve a Definitive Plan with appurtenant Profile' 
and Topographic Plans and shall impose such conditions and restric 
tions deemed appropriate by the Board, consistant with the pro- 
visions of Section VI.E.l.l.c. Such earth material removal from 
the site of a proposed subdivision must be incidental to the pre- 
paration of proposed roads or ways and may be removed solely from 
the proposed roads or ways down to the grades approved on the 
Definitive Plan. In addition, the Board may approve earth mater- 
ial removal from the site in an aggregate amount not to exceed 
five hundred (500) cubic yards per lot if removal is deemed 
necessary by the Board for the subdivision to comply with the 
Design Requirements of the Board of Health and/or the Planning 
Board. In these circumstances, sufficient loam must be retained 
on the subdivision site for regrading to a minimum depth of six 
inches over the subsoil. As above, the Board shall impose such 
conditions and restrictions as deemed appropriate, consistent 
with the provisions of Section VI.E.l.l.c. 

b. When, in the opinion of the Building Inspector, it is deemed 
necessary to remove earth material from the site of a proposed 
building, the Building Inspector shall issue a Building Permit 
with appurtenant Topographic Plans and shall impose such con- 
ditions and restrictions deemed appropriate by the Inspector, 
consistent with the provisions of Section VI.E.l.l.c. Such 
earth material removal from the site must be incidental to 
the preparation of the building site and may be removed solely 
from the area of the building, the driveways, the parking areas 
and areas where removal is specifically required by the Board of 
Health in connection with disposal systems. Where special cir- 
cumstances exist, the Building Inspector may approve earth materia! 
removal pursuant to the provisions of Section VI. E. 1.3. below. In all 
cases, sufficient loam shall be retained on the site for regrading 
to a minimum depth of six inches over the subsoil. 

1.3 Miscellaneous Removal of Earth Material 

Miscellaneous removal of earth material not addressed under the 
provisions of Section VI. E. 1.1 or 1.2 above may be permitted if 
the Town determines that the removal is necessary and incidental 
to the improvement of the property from which the removal is to 
take place, and provided that the removal is in accordance with 
the express intent and purposes of the provisions of this By-Law. 
Removal of aggregate amounts of less than fifty (50) cubic yards 
of earth material from any lot in any one year requires no prior 
permit or approval. Removal of earth material in quantities in 



78 






I 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

excess of fifty (50) cubic yards but less than two hundred (200) 
cubic yards per lot per year may be permitted only after a topo- 
graphic plan is submitted and application is made to the Building 
Inspector for a Miscellaneous Earth Material Removal Permit. The 
Building Inspector, with the concurrence of the Town Engineer, 
may issue such a permit. The permit shall designate the quantity 
of earth material permitted to be removed, the purpose of the re- 
moval, the location of the site of removal, and the location of 
the site of disposal. The permit shall also specify that upon 
completion of the removal, exposed subsoil shall be regraded and 
covered with loam to a minimum depth of six inches. Except where 
the removal under this subsection 1.3 is permitted in connection 
with the formation or enlargement of a pond, removal shall not 
be permitted below the mean grade of the street or road serving 
the property. In no case shall the removal be permitted so as 
to change the direction of flow of a watercourse or to cause 
surface waters to gather as in a sump or swale. Pits for burying 
large rocks, stumps, or other spoil material shall be immediately 
backfilled for safety reasons. In addition, the Building Inspector 
shall impose such conditions and restrictions as he and the Town 
Engineer deem appropriate, consistant with the provisions of 
Section VI.E.l.l.c. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 36 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section IV. B. of the 
Zoning By-Law (Table of Use Regulations) by striking out Item 34A in its 
entirety and substituting the following therefor: 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB IG I A ID 

34A. General removal of soil, loam, 
sand, gravel or peat subject 
to the provisions of Sec. VI. 
E.l.l. NNNNNNNNBSBS 

Inserted by John Lugus and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Section IV. B of the 
Zoning By-Law (Table of Use Regulations) by striking out Item 34A in its en- 
tirety and substituting the following therefor: 

SRA SRB SRC APT SC OP GB IG IA ID 

34A. General removal of soil, loam, 
sand, gravel or peat subject 
to the provisions of Sec. VI. 
E.l.l. NNNNNNNNBSBS 

The Vote YES — 421 NO — 71 More than the 2/3 required. 
A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws, Section 
VI. E. 1.2 (Soil Removal incidental to Development and construction) by adding 
the following to Paragraph a: 

In addition, as part of and set forth in such approval shall be 
the restrictions and considerations as set forth in Section VI. 
E. 1. lc above . 

Inserted by John Lugus and Others. 

Article 38 was withdrawn. 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15, 1980 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to instruct its Legislators to 
introduce Legislation to enable the Town of Andover to establish a revolving 
fund in the amount of $3,000.00 for the purpose of enabling Andover Public 
School related citizen organizations to reimburse the school department for 
expenses necessary for the conduct of their activities. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the West Elementary 
Parent-Teachers Organization. 

Article 39 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to instruct its Legislators to 
introduce Legislation to enable the Town of Andover to establish a revolving 
fund in the amount of $5,000.00 for the purpose of enabling the Town to 
receive funds for Restitution for damages to public property and expend 
such funds for repairs to public property. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 40 as 
printed in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to request Legislative Representative 
of the Town of Andover to introduce Legislation to authorize the drafting and 
adoption of local ordinances, By-Laws or other Municipal regulation to prohibit 
the transporting of Nuclear Waste Materials of any description through the Town 
of Andover upon any Highway, Street, Road or other Public Way, by rail, truck 
or other vehicle of any common carrier or other transporting agent either publi 
or private at any point in time. 

Inserted on Petition of Irving Gershenberg and Others. 

Article 41 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to request Legislative Representative: 
of the Town of Andover to introduce Legislation to prohibit the transport of 
Nuclear Waste Materials of any description through the Town of Andover upon 
any Highway, Street, Road or other public way, by rail, truck or other vehicle 
of any common carrier or other transporting agent either public or private at 
any point in time. 

On Petition of Irving Gershenberg and Others. 

Article 42 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $150,000.00 or any other sum for the purpose of re- 
constructing the so-called Recreation Park Lodge. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

ARTICLE 43 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws Section 
VI. (Other Requirements) by adding a subsection 'N' entitled Historic District 
to read as follows: 

L. Historic District 

1. Designation. An Historic District shall be that area or location so 
designated in the listing of the National Register of Historic Places 
promulgated by the U . S .Department of the Interior and on file with 

the Town Clerk and the Department of Community Development and Planning. 

2. Regulations. A Special Permit for all new construction and substantial 
improvements (repair, reconstruction or alteration costing 50% or more 



80 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 15,1980 

of the market value of the structure before improvement or, if damaged, 
before damage occurred) may be granted by the Zoning Board of Appeals 
for all Principal uses, other main uses and accessory uses in districts 
where authorized by Section IV. B. (Table of Use Regulations) subject to 
the following requirements: 

(a) This By-Law shall not apply to a detached one-family dwelling 
located on a single lot in a Single Residence District. In 
addition, this By-Law shall not apply to substantial improve- 
ments which do not alter the building exterior. 

(b) Any development within the Historic District shall be subject 
to all otherwise applicable requirements of the underlying 
zoning district in which it is located, including usual use 
and dimensional requirements. 

(c) The criteria of Section VIII, C. (Special Permits) of the 
Zoning By-Law shall be met. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 44 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Public Ways and name 
Brady Loop and Monahan Lane as shown on a plan of land entitled : "Subdivision 
and Acceptance Plan, Andover Hills, subdivider Joseph W. Monahan, III; Engr. 
CLinton F. Goodwin R.L.S. dated May 9, 1972" and recorded with the Essex No. 
Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 6761, plan and description along with the 
necessary deed and easements on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of Richard K. Gordon and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 45 as 
printed in the warrant. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Public Way and name 
Old School House Road, as shown on a plan of land which was approved by the 
Andover Planning Board, said way being shown on a plan entitled : "Subdivision 
and Acceptance Plan, Old School House Estates, Andover, Mass., Olympic Con- 
struction Co., (Owner), scale 1" = 40', July 1976, Charles E. Cyr, Civil 
Engineer, Lawrence, Mass." and said plan is recorded with the Essex North 
District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 7582. Plan and description along with 
the necessary deed or deeds and easements on file with the Town Clerk. 

Petition of Reginald L. Harden and others. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 46 as 
printed in the warrant. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED 
to adjourn at 10:30 P.M. until Wednesday, April 16, 1980 at 7:30 P.M. in the 
Case Memorial Cage , Phillips Academy. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

The check lists were used at the entrance and showed 1025 voters admitted 
to the meeting. 

To meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 7:43 P.M. 

ARTICLE 47 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws by in- 
serting the following as Article XIII. 



81 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

ANDOVER WETLAND BY-LAW 

A. APPLICATION 

The purpose of this By-Law is to protect the wetlands of the Town of 
Andover by controlling activities which have a significant effect upon 
wetland values, including but not limited to the following: public or 
private water supply, ground water, flood control, erosion control, 
storm damage, water pollution, fisheries, wild life, recreation and 
aesthetics (collectively, the "interests protected by this By-Law"). 

No person shall remove, fill, dredge, alter, or build upon or within 
100 feet of any bank, fresh water wetland, flat, marsh, meadow, bog, 
swamp or lands bordering on any creek, river, stream, pond or lake, 
or any land under said waters or any land subject to flooding or in- 
undation, or within 100 feet of the 100-year storm line, other than 
in the course of maintaining, repairing or replacing but not sub- 
stantially changing or enlarging, an existing and lawfully located 
structure or facility used in the service of the public and used to 
provide electric, gas, water, telephone, telegraph and other tele- 
communication services, without filing written application for a 
permit so to remove, fill, dredge, alter or build upon, including 
such plans as may be necessary to describe such proposed activity 
and its effect on the environment, and receiving and complying with 
a permit issued pursuant to this By-Law. 

Such application may be identical in form to a notice of intent filed 
pursuant to Chapter 131, Section 40 of the General Laws, shall be 
sent by certified mail to the Andover Conservation Commission (the 
"Commission"), shall be accompanied by a filing fee of twenty-five 
dollars payable to the Town of Andover, and may be filed before 
other permits, variances and approvals required by the Zoning By- 
Law, the Subdivision control law or any other by-law or regulation 
have been obtained. Copies of the application shall be sent at 
the same time, by certified mail, to the Board of Selectmen, the 
Planning Board and the Board of Health. Upon written request of 
any person, the Commission shall, within twenty-one days, make a 
written determination as to whether this By-Law is applicable to 
any land or work thereon. When the person requesting the determin- 
ation is other than the owner, notice of the determination shall be 
sent to the owner as well as to the requesting person. 

B. HEARING 

The Commission shall hold a public hearing on the application within 
twenty-one days of its receipt. Notice of the time and place of the 
hearing shall be given by the Commission at the expense of the appli- 
cant, not less than five days prior to the hearing, by publication in 
a newspaper of general circulation in Andover and by mailing a notice 
to the applicant, the Board of Health, the Board of Selectmen, Plan- 
ning Board and to such other persons as the commission may by regul- 
ation determine. The Commission, its agents, officers and employees, 
may enter upon the applicant's land for the purpose of performing 
their duties under this By-Law. 

1. PERMIT AND CONDITIONS 

If, after the public hearing, the Commission determines that 
the area which is the subject of the application is significant 
to the interests protected by this By-Law, the Commission shall, 
within twenty-one days of such hearing, issue or deny a permit 
for the work requested. If it issues a permit after making 
such determination, the Commission shall impose such conditions 
as it determines are necessary or desirable for protection of 
those interests, and all work shall be done in accordance with 
those conditions. If the Commission determines that the area 

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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

which is the subject of the application is not significant to 
the interests protected by this By-Law, or that the proposed 
activity does not require the imposition of conditions, it 
shall issue a permit without conditions within twenty-one 
days of the public hearing. Permits shall expire one year 
from the date of issuance, unless renewed prior to expir- 
ation, and all work shall be completed prior to expiration. 

RELATIONSHIP TO CHAPTER 131, SECTION 40 



The Commission shall not impose additional or more stringent 
conditions pursuant to Chapter 131, Section 40 of the General 
Laws than it imposes pursuant to this By-Law, nor shall it 
require a notice of intention pursuant to Section 40 to pro- 
vide materials or data in addition to those required pursuant 
to this By-Law. 

EMERGENCY PROJECTS. 



This By-Law shall not apply to any emergency project as defined in 
Chapter 131, Section 40 of the General Laws. 

D. PRE-ACQUISITION VIOLATION 

Any person who purchases, inherits or otherwise acquires real estate 
upon which work has been done in violation of the provisions of this 
By-Law or in violation of any permit issued pursuant to this By-Law 
shall forthwith comply with any such order or restore such land to 
its condition prior to any such violation; provided, however, that 
no action, civil or criminal, shall be brought against such person 
unless commenced within three years following the date of acquisition 
of the real estate by such person. 

E. REGULATIONS 

After due notice and public hearing, the Commission may promulgate 
rules and regulations to effectuate the purposes of this By-Law. 
Failure by the Commission to promulgate such rules and regulations 
or a legal declaration of their invalidity by a court of law shall 
not act to suspend or invalidate the effect of this By-Law. 

F. BURDEN OF PROOF 

The applicant shall have the burden of proving by a preponderance 
of the credible evidence that the work proposed in the application 
will not harm the interests protected by this By-Law. Failure to 
provide adequate evidence to the Commission supporting a determin- 
ation that the proposed work will not harm the interests protected 
by this By-Law shall be sufficient cause for the commission to deny 
a permit or grant a permit with conditions, or, in the Commission's 
discretion, to continue the hearing to another date to enable the 
applicant or others to present additional evidence. 

G. DEFINITIONS 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and imple- 
mentation of this By-Law: 

1. The term "person" shall include any individual, group of 
individuals, association, partnership, corporation, com- 
pany, business organization, trust, estate, the Common- 
wealth or political subdivision thereof to the extent 
subject to Town By-Laws, administrative agencies, public 
or quasi-public corporations or bodies, the Town of Andover 
and any other legal entity, its legal representatives, agents 
or assigns. 



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ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

2. The term "alter" shall include, without limitation, the 
following actions when undertaken in areas subject to this 
By-Law: 

a. Removal, excavation or dredging of soil, sand, gravel or 
aggregate material of any kind; 

b. Changing drainage characteristics, flushing characteristics, 
salinity distribution, sedimentation patterns, flow patterns 
and flood retention characteristics; 

c. Drainage or other disturbance of water level or water table; 

d. dumping, discharging or filling with any material which may 
degrade water quality; 

e. driving of piles, erection of buildings or structures of 
any kind; 

f. placing of obstructions whether or not they interfere with 
the flow of water; 

g. destruction of plant life, including cutting of trees; 

h. Changing of water temperature, biochemical oxygen demand 
or other physical or chemical characteristics of the water. 

3. The term "banks" shall mean that part of land adjoining any body 
of water which confines the water. 

4. The Commission may adopt additional definitions not inconsistent 
with this section G in its regulations promulgated pursuant to Sec- 
tion E. of this By-Law. 

H. ENFORCEMENT 

Any person who violates any provision of this By-Law or of any con- 
dition of a permit issued pursuant to it shall be punished by a fine 
of not more than $200.00. Each day of portion thereof during which 
a violation continues shall constitute a separate offense; if more 
than one, each condition violated shall constitute a separate offense. 
This By-Law may be enforced by a Town police officer or a natural re- 
sources officer appointed by the Conservation Commission. Upon request 
of the Commission, the Town Manager, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, shall take such legal action as may be necessary to enforce 
this By-Law and permits issued pursuant to it. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the Conservation 
Commission. 

Article 47 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article XII, Miscellaneous 
Town By-Laws, by inserting the following as Section 25: 

Section 25. AUTHORITY TO REQUIRE BONDS OR OTHER SECURITY. 






Before approval of an application for a license, permit or order of 
conditions, the Planning Board, Conservation Commission or Board of 
Health may require the applicant to file with it a performance bond, 
deposit of money, or negotiable securities, to secure the timely com- 
pletion of the work or activity in accordance with the license, permit, 
or order of conditions. The bond or other security may be in such form 
and amount, and may contain such terms and conditions, as the Board or 
Commission, in its discretion, may require. The amount of the bond 
shall not exceed the cost of the approved work or activity. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 



84 






ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend Article XII, 
Miscellaneous Town By-Laws, by inserting the following as Section 25: 

Section 25. AUTHORITY TO REQUIRE BONDS OR OTHER SECURITY 

Before approval of an application for a license, permit or order 
of conditions, the Planning Board, Conservation Commission or Board 
of Health may require the applicant to file with it a performance 
bond, deposit of money, or negotiable securities, to secure the 
timely completion of the work or activity in accordance with the 
license, permit or order of conditions. The bond or other security 
may be in such form and amount , and may contain such terms and con- 
ditions as the Board or Commission , in its discretion, may require. 
The amount of the bond shall not exceed the cost of the approved 
work or activity. 

Article 48 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride. 

ARTICLE 49 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws Article 
I, Section 4. Enforcement, by inserting the following after the second para- 
graph : 

As an alternative to enforcement through criminal proceedings, to re- 
cover a fine as provided above, the following non-criminal disposition 
may be made of any violation of any ordinance, by-law, rule or regul- 
ation of any municipal officer, board or department, the violation of 
which is subject to the specific penalty stated above or any other 
specific penalty provided by law. 

Any person noting a violation of any such ordinance, by-law, rule or 
regulation which he is empowered to enforce, may serve the offender 
a written notice to appear before the Clerk of the Lawrence District 
Court not later than twenty-one days after the date of such notice. 
Any person notified to appear before the Clerk of the Lawrence Dis- 
trict Court may appear and confess the offense charged, either per- 
sonally or through an agent or by mailing with the notice such specific 
sum of money not exceeding two hundred dollars as the town shall fix as 
a penalty for violation of the by-law, rule or regulation. The payment 
to the clerk of such sum shall operate as a final disposition of the case, 

If any person so notified to appear desires to contest the alleged 
violation, he may, within twenty-one days after the date of the notice, 
request a hearing in writing. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to amend the Town By-Law 
Article 1, Section 4. Enforcement, by inserting the following after the 
second paragraph. 

As an alternative to enforcement through criminal proceedings, to re- 
cover a fine as provided above, the following non-criminal disposition 
may be made of any violation of any ordinance, by-law, rule or regul- 
ation of any municipal officer, board or department, the violation of 
which is subject to the specific penalty stated above or any other 
specific penalty provided by law. 

Any person noting a violation of any such ordinance, by-law, rule or 
regulation which he is empowered to enforce, may serve the offender 
a written notice to appear before the Clerk of the Lawrence District 
Court not later than twenty-one days after the date of such notice. 
Any person notified to appear before the clerk of the Lawrence Dis- 
trict Court may appear and confess the offense charged, either per- 
sonally or through an agent or by mailing with the notice such specific 



85 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

sum of money not exceeding two hundred dollars as the town shall fix 
as a penalty for violation of the by-law, rule or regulation. The 
payment to the clerk of such sum shall operate as a final disposition 
of the case. 

If a person so notified to appear desires to contest the alleged 
violation, he may within twenty-one days after the date of notice 
request a hearing in writing. 

Article 49 passed by a majority vote. A quorum was present. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride . 

ARTICLE 50 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation 
Commission to acquire for conservation purposes under G.L. Chapter 40, 
Section 8C as amended, to be held in the care and custody of the Conser- 
vation Commission, the fee or any lesser interest in the following des- 
cribed parcels of land and the buildings. thereon : 

Shown on Subdivision and Acceptance Plan "Forest Hill Commons, Scale 1" = 40' 
September 1979" : 

Lot 58-2, consisting of 45,970 square feet more or less and supposed 

to be owned by Launching Road Trust of Andover; 

Lot 59-2 and 326-1, considered as one lot and consisting of 31,230 
square feet more or less and supposed to be owned by Launching Road 
Trust of Andover; 

Lot 67, consisting of 40,059 square feet more or less and supposed to 

be owned by Theodore Realty Trust; 
Shown on Subdivision and Acceptance Plan "Forest Hill Commons, Scale 1" = 40' 
February 28,1968',' and said plan is filed with North Essex Registry of Deeds 
as No. 5908: 

Lot 46 and 318 considered as one lot and consisting of 30,638 square 

feet more or less and supposed to be owned by Arrowood Builders, Inc; 

Lot 323 and 50 considered as one lot and consisting of 30,193 square 
feet more or less, supposed to be owned by Arrowood Builders, Inc.; 

All said acquisitions to be made by expenditure from the Conservation Fund; 
all terms and conditions of the acquisitions to be subject to approval by 
the Board of Selectmen. The Conservation Commission is further authorized 
to apply for and accept any State Self-Help Funds under the provisions of 
G.L. Chapter 132A, Section 11 and enter into contract thereto, and to apply 
for and accept any Federal Funds that may be available in connection with 
such acquisitions. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 50 as 
printed in the warrant. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride. 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Forest Hill Drive from Sandalwood Lane to Cross Street, as approved by the 
Andover Planning Board and laid out by the Board of Selectmen as shown on a 
plan of land entitled: "Subdivision and Acceptance plan 'Forest Hill Commons' 
subdivider : Forest Hills of Andover, Inc ., Engineer Osborn Palmer, Inc. 15 Walli 
Street, Peabody, Mass., Scale 1" = 120', Dated Feb. 28, 1968" and said plan is 
recorded with the Essex North District Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 5908. 
Plan and description along with the necessary deed or deeds and easements on 
file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of George Chongris and others. 

Article 51 was withdrawn. 



86 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public way and name 
Sandalwood Lane as approved by the Andover Planning Board and laid out by the 
Board of Selectmen as shown on a plan of land entitled: "Subdivision & Accept- 
ance plan 'Forest Hill Commons', Subdivider: Forest Hills of Andover, Inc., 
Engineer: Osborn Palmer, Inc., 15 Wallis Street, Peabody, Mass. Scale 1" = 120' 
Dated February 28, 1968" and said plan is recorded with the Essex North Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds as Plan No. 5908, plan and description along with the 
necessary deed or deeds and easements on file with the Town Clerk. 

On petition of George Chongris and others. 

Article 52 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell 
a portion of the Town-Owned land identified as Map 55, Lot 127, to Peter 
Onanian, d/b/a Olde Andover Village, upon such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen may order, said property located adjacent to and behind Olde 
Andover Village and more particularly described in Lot Parcel description 
filed in the Town Clerk's Office. 

On petition of Philip F. Sullivan and others. 

Article 53 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing under Section VII, Chapter 44 of the Gen- 
eral Laws, or by any combination of the foregoing and appropriate the sum of 
$150,000.00 or any other sum to be combined with funds received from the 
United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Commonwealth of Mass- 
achusetts for the cost of engineering and related services to perform a Sewer 
System Evaluation Survey (SSES), and to prepare construction drawings and 
specifications for a replacement pumping station for the Existing Riverina 
Road Pumping Station, necessary sewer and force main connections required 
for the replacement station and a new interceptor parallel to the existing 
outfall sewer in Lawrence, Mass., and to take or obtain the necessary lands 
and easements by gift, by purchase or by seizure by right of eminent domain, 
and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to spend and to borrow 
in anticipation of any State and Federal Grant Funds and reimbursements. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 54 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $150,000.00 to be 
raised by taxation. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws, Section 
V.A. (Dimensional Requirements) by striking out the number '15' as it describes 
the minimum side yard depth requirements for the Single Residence Districts 
B and C and inserting the number 20 therefor. The provision of this Zoning 
By-Law amendment shall not apply to those lots approved prior to the adoption 
of this amendment pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L. Chapters 40A and 41 
and the rules and regulations governing the subdivision of land in the Town 
of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 55 was defeated. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws, Section 
V.B.2.d. (Exceptions and Special Requirements - Yards) by adding the following: 

In addition, one minimum side yard depth requirement and one minimum 
rear yard depth requirement shall be applicable to the lot and deter- 
mined at the time of the Building Permit issuance.- The provision of 



87 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

this Zoning By-Law amendment shall not apply to those lots approved 
prior to the adoption of this amendment pursuant to the provisions 
of M.G.L. Chapters 40A and 41 and the Rules and Regulations governing 
the Subdivision of Land in the Town of Andover. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend the 
Zoning By-Laws, Section V.B.2.d (Exceptions and Special Requirements - Yards) 
by adding the following: 

In addition, one minimum side yard depth requirement and one minimum 
rear yard depth requirement shall be applicable to the lot and det- 
ermined at the time of the Building Permit issuance. The provision of 
this Zoning By-Law amendment shall not apply to those lots approved 
prior to the adoption of this amendment pursuant to the provisions 
of M.G.L. Chapters 40A and 41 and the Rules and Regulations governing 
the Subdivision of Land in the Town of Andover. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law, Section 
VI.D.l. (Cluster Development - Dimensional Requirements) by deleting item 'd' 
in its entirety and inserting the following therefor: 

d. All lots on existing town or public ways or lots abutting 
proposed 'major' streets of the development (see Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations) shall conform to the frontage and area 
requirements of the zoning district in which the development lies. 
The provision of this Zoning By-Law amendment shall not apply to 
those lots approved prior to the adoption of this amendment pur- 
suant to the provisions of M.G.L. Chapters 40A and 41 and the 
Rules and Regulations governing the Subdivision of land in 
the Town of Andover. 

Inserted By the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to amend the 
Zoning By-Laws, Section VI .D. 1 . (Cluster Development - Dimensional Require- 
ments) by deleting item 'd' in its entirety and inserting the following 
therefor : 

d. All lots on existing town or public ways or lots abutting 
proposed 'major' streets of the development (see Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations) shall conform to the frontage and area 
requirements of the zoning district in which the development lies. 
The provisions of this Zoning By-Law amendment shall not apply to 
those lots approved prior to the adoption of this amendment pur- 
suant to the Provisions of M.G.L. Chapters 40A and 41 and the 
Rules and Regulations governing the Subdivision of land in 
the Town of Andover. 

The Vote UNANIMOUS. More than the 2/3 required. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Patricia Curtin. 

ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer, 
by borrowing or any combination of the foregoing and appropriate $7,500.00 
or any other sum for the purpose of resurfacing with Bituminous concrete the 
Library Parking Lot and Town-Owned land adjacent to the Community Development 
Building. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 



88 






ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

Article 58 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $7,500.00 to be trans- 
ferred from the unexpended balance of Article 27 of the Annual Town Meeting 
of 1977. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride. 

ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public storm drains 
and public sewers, certain drains and sewer lines constructed respectively 
in River Road and Old River Road, more particularly described as follows: 

1. A box culvert, 10 feet wide by 5 feet high, located in River Road 
as more particularly shown on plans entitled "Andover Tech Center, 
Andover, Mass., sewer and drain construction, SW Quadrant to Merri- 
mack River, Southwest Quadrant Access roadway construction", pre- 
pared by H.W. Moore Associates Inc., Consulting Engineers dated 
8-30-79, revised 9-14-79 (15 sheets ) (sheet 7 of 15); 

2. A 12 inch sewer line in said River Road as shown on said plans 
(sheet 7 of 15); 

3. A box culvert, 10 feet wide by 5 feet high, located in Old River 
Road as shown on said plans (sheet 6 of 15); and 

4 . A 12 inch sewer line located in said Old River Road as shown on 
said plans (sheet 6 of 15). 

A copy of said plans are on file with the Andover Department of Public Works. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the Andover Development 
and Industrial Commission. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 59 as printed in the warrant. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

ARTICLE 60. To see what disposition shall be made of Unexpended appropriations 
and Free Cash in the Treasury. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the following balances 
be lapsed and returned to Certified Free Cash: 

1979 Emergency Repairs, Sewers $ 14,279.36 

1970 Easements, River Road 1,750.00 

1976 Improvements, Roadways 356.57 
1978 Ballardvale Railroad Crossing 8,408.43 

1977 Fish Brook Station - Add 500.00 
1977 Water Mains 25,818.08 
1977 Central Park Lighting 178.12 
1977 Parking Lot 8,500.00 
1976 High School Roof 14,436.10 
1975 Police Radios 34.00 
1975 Police Equipment 484.05 
1972 Land Acquisition Library 5,000.00 



Art. 


34 


Art. 


50 


Art. 


19 


Art. 


2A 


Art. 


4 


Art. 


9 


Art. 


25 


Art. 


27 


Art. 


1A 


Art. 


25 


Art. 


7A 


Art. 


37 



$ 79,744.71 



ARTICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to direct that the sum of $1,250,000, 
be retained in Free Cash and further that the Assessors be allowed to use any 
part of the balance of said Free Cash to reduce the Fiscal Year 1981 Tax Rate 
and to effect appropriations voted at the 1980 Annual Town Meeting. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the sum 



89 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16 , 1980 



of $1,250,000.00 be retained in Free Cash and further that all of the remain- 
ing balances be used to reduce the Fiscal Year 1981 tax rate and to affect 
appropriations voted at the 1980 Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds or by any combination of the foregoing, a sum not to 
exceed $5,000.00 to pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in 
prior Fiscal Years. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the Town 
transfer from Available Funds the sum of $4,937.59 to pay the following unpaid 
bills incurred in prior fiscal years: 






1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



Eastman Kodak Company 
Trophy Outlet 
Busfield Cranton (oil) 
Michael J. Bresnahan ,M.D 
McLean Hospital 
J.L. Hammett 
J.L. Hammett 
Prentice-Hall , 
Manzi Electric 



School Dept 



Inc , 



Community Services 



$ 186.00 

29.65 

2,016.80 

25.00 

2,048.00 

17.12 

17.12 

123.37 

474.53 

$ 4,937.59 



The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 4/5 required. 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to raise by transfer from available 
funds the sum of $65,000.00 for the purpose of undertaking an actuarial study 
of the Town of Andover Pension System, and in accordance with the provisions 
of Chapter 40, Section 5D of the Massachusetts General Laws, establish a sep- 
arate budget category under Retirement entitled "Pension Funding" and trans- 
fer any remaining balance of this article thereto. Said Section 5D author- 
izes cities and towns to establish special funds for pension funding purposes 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 63 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $65,000.00 from Avail- 
able Funds: a sum not exceeding $3,000.00 shall be used to complete the 
actuarial study and development of implementation plan of the Town's Pension 
Plan Systems and the balance to be used to eatablish a special fund for pen- 
sion funding purposes. 



The Vote UNANIMOUS 



More than the 2/3 required. 



ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to recommend to the School Committee: 

A. That the Bancroft Elementary School be closed and then sold to 
public or private parties. 

B. That the money realized from such sale of the Bancroft Elementary 
School be used to renovate the East Junior High School and to con- 
tinue utilizing it as a junior high school. 

On petition of Peter C. Mullett and others. 

Article 64 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate a sum not exceeding $11,500,000.00 for the following school pro- 
jects including architects fees and other incidental costs: 

1. Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition or 
additions to and reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitating and 
modernizing school buildings at the Doherty Elementary School/East 



90 






ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

Junior High School site for use as a junior high school; 

2. Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing additions to the 
High School, including an auditorium, and reconstructing, remodeling, 
rehabilitating and modernizing the High School; 

3. Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition or 
additions to and reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitating and 
modernizing the West Junior High School. 

Inserted at the request of the School Committee and the School Building 
Committee . 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to consider each project 
separately. 

* Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $5,580,000.00 
be appropriated for the following school project: 

Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition 
or additions to and reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitating 
and modernizing the Doherty Elementary School so as to convert 
such school for use as a junior high school 

and that to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding $5,580,000. 
at one time or from time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes therefor; 

provided, however, that the interest rate on any original borrowing hereunder 
issued prior to the signing of a construction contract in connection with any 
of the foregoing projects shall not exceed 9£% per annum; and 

provided further that no sum shall be borrowed for any particular project until 
that project has been approved for a state school construction grant of not 
less than 50% of construction costs including architects' fees and not less 
than 20% of interest costs. 

The Vote YES — 796 NO — 128 More than the 2/3 required. 

* Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $4,370,000.00 
be appropriated for the following project: 

Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition 
to the High School, including an auditorium, and reconstructing 
remodeling, rehabilitating and modernizing the High School; 

and that to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding $4,370,000. 
at one time or from time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes therefor; 

provided, however, that the interest rate on any original borrowing hereunder 
issued prior to the signing of a construction contract in connection with any 
of the foregoing projects shall not exceed 9£% per annum; and 

provided further that no sum shall be borrowed for any particular project until 
that project has been approved for a state school construction grant of not 
less than 50% of construction costs including architects' fees and not less 
than 20% of interest costs. 

The Vote YES — 795 NO — 119 More than the 2/3 required. 

* Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $1,050,000.00 
be approved for the following project: 



91 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition 
or additions to and reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitating 
and modernizing the West Junior High School; 

and that to meet such appropriation, the Town Treasurer, with the approval of 
the Board of Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow not exceeding $1,050,000. 
at one time or from time to time under and pursuant to Chapter 645 of the Acts 
of 1948, as amended and supplemented, or any other enabling authority, and to 
issue bonds or notes therefor; 

provided, however, that the interest rate on any original borrowing hereunder 
issued prior to the signing of a construction contract in connection with any 
of the foregoing projects shall not exceed 9i% per annum; and 

provided further that no sum shall be borrowed for any particular project until 
that project has been approved for a state school construction grant of not 
less than 50% of construction costs including architects' fees and not less 
than 20% of interest costs. 

The Vote YES — 742 NO — 53 More than the 2/3 required. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Frank McBride. 

* All these motions were read for informational purposes and then each motion 
was read and voted on separately. 

ARTICLE 66. The following question is submitted to the Town Meeting members 
to aid the School Building Committee in completing their charge of responsi- 
bility to complete construction and renovations of school buildings and grounds 
for Andover Secondary Schools. 

Shall the School Building Committee continue to proceed with the 
preparation of construction documents and specifications and re- 
ceive bids for the following school projects: 

1. Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition 
or additions to and reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitating, 
and modernizing school buildings at the Doherty Elementary 
School/East Junior high School site for use as a junior high School; 

2. Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing additions to 
the High School, including an auditorium, and reconstructing, 
remodeling, rehabilitating and modernizing the High School; 

3. Constructing, originally equipping and furnishing an addition 
or additions to and reconstructing, remodeling, rehabilitating 
and modernizing the West Junior High School. 

Inserted at the request of the School Building Committee and the School 
Committee. 

Article 66 was withdrawn. 

ARTICLE 67. The following advisory question is submitted to the Town Meeting 
members to aid the Town Manager and Planning Board in arriving at an ultimate 
determination concerning the reuse of East Junior High School; 

"Shall the Town and Planning Board proceed with the preparation 
of cost estimates for the retention of architectural and other 
consulting services to investigate the feasibility of and the 
development of preliminary plans for the reuse of the current 
East Junior High School or any portion thereof for town and/or 
school administrative offices and/or other town and/or school 
purposes?" 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen at the request of the School Committee and 
the School Building Committee. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the question contained 
in Article 67 be voted in the affirmative. 

92 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 16, 1980 

A Planning Board report was read by Paul Teplitz. 

ARTICLE 68. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing or by any combination of the foregoing and 
appropriate the sum of $56,000.00 or any other sum for purposes of retaining 
services of an architect or architects or other consultants to investigate 
the feasibility of reusing the current East Junior High School or any portion 
thereof for Town and/or school administrative offices and/or any other town 
and/or school purposes and develop preliminary plans and cost estimates 
therefore. 

Inserted by the Board of Selectmen. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to approve 
Article 68 as printed in the warrant in the amount of $56,000.00 from taxation 

The Vote UNANIMOUS More than the 2/3 required. 

A report by the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY that the Town 
increase the appropriations limit, established by Chapter 151 of the Acts of 
1979, $1,502,209.00 so that the appropriations limit as so increased will be 
$22,428,033.00 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED UNANIMOUSLY to increase the 
levy limit established by Chapter 151 of the Acts of 1979 by net more than 
$1,200,000.00 so that the levy limit as so increased will not be more than 
$23,025,430.00. 

Upon motion made by Town counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was VOTED 
to dissolve the 1980 Annual Town Meeting at 11:15 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST 

Elden R. Salter, CMC 
Town Clerk 



93 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 20, 1980 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen, October 27, 1980, the In- 
habitants of the Town of Andover , qualified to vote in Town Affairs, met and 
assembled in the Memorial Auditorium, Bartlet Street, in said Andover on Thurs- 
day, the twentieth day of November, 1980, at 7:30 P.M. 

The meeting was called to order by James D. Doherty, Moderator, at 7:40 P.M. 

Check lists were used at the entrance and showed 822 voters admitted to the 
meeting . 

The Moderator announced that there would be no smoking in the auditorium. 

Unanimous consent was voted to admit 20 non-voters to the meeting. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded, it was voted to 
dispense with the reading of the warrant and return of Service of the Constable, 
and that the Moderator refer to the Articles by number and subject matter. 

Essex, SS_;_ October 30, 1980 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables 
of the Town of Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at 
the time and place and for the purposes stated in said warrant by posting a 
true and attested copy of the same on the Town Hall, on each Schoolhouse, and 
in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are usually 
posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said warrants have been 
posted and published fourteen days. 

Thomas P. Eldred 
Constable 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by 

I. creating a new class of zoning district to be designated as Townhouse 
Cluster District by adding to Section III, A, 1 the following: 

TC - Townhouse Cluster 

II. inserting after Section VI, M, Section VI, N, as follows: 

N - Multi-Dwelling District TC - Townhouse Cluster 

1. GENERAL OBJECTIVES 

The TC district is intended to allow greater flexibility in land use 
planning for the development of tracts of land in terms of density, 
preservation of open spaces, utilization of natural features, pro- 
vision of municipal services and providing a variety of housing types 
and styles; to ensure that site development plans will be presented 
to the Town Meeting in connection with a proposal to rezone a tract 
of land to TC; and to enable the Planning Board to require adherence 
to such site development plans in the granting of a special permit as 
hereinafter described. 

2. COMPLIANCE WITH SCHEDULE OF DIMENSIONAL CONTROLS 

Any development permitted as a TC district shall comply with the 
Schedule of Dimensional Controls for TC district as follows: 

Minimum setbacks from exterior lot lines: 

Front 60 feet 

Side and Rear 50 feet 

Minimum setback from interior streets: 25 feet 

Minimum distance between buildings: 30 feet 

Interior drives within a TC development shall be designed to such street 
standards as the Planning Board may require in accordance with its Rules 

94 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 20, 1980 

and Regulations governing the subdivision of land, except that a minor 
street shall serve up to twenty dwelling units. 

3. COMPLIANCE WITH OTHER RULES AND REGULATIONS 

Nothing contained herein shall in any way exempt a proposed subdivision 
in a TC district from compliance with the rules and regulations of the 
Planning Board, nor shall it in any way affect the right of the Board 
of Health and of the Planning Board to approve with or without modifi- 
cations, or disapprove a subdivision plan in accordance with the pro- 
visions of such rules and regulations and of the subdivision control law. 

4. TOWN MEETING PRESENTATION 

Every proposal presented to the Town Meeting for rezoning land to a TC 
zone shall include a site development plan which shall show in a general 
manner, drawn to scale, the proposed location, for proposed building and 
other structures, proposed locations, design and dimensions of streets, 
drives, parking areas and other paved areas and the open space. The 
site development plan shall show the proposed dwelling unit density, and 
the extent of open space or shall be accompanied by a tabulation of the 
same. A copy of the site development plan, which shall be deemed to in- 
clude any literature and commitments authorized by the developer, which 
has been presented to Town Meeting shall be filed with the Town Clerk 
before the vote and shall be part of the site development plan. 

5. PARKING SPACE 

There shall be provided at least 1 1/2 parking spaces per dwelling unit, 
located in parking lots or in garages or under or within buildings which 
contain dwelling units. 

6. PERMITTED HOUSING TYPES 

Permissible housing types include all single and multiple-occupancy 
housing types used for human occupancy. Any type of ownership may be 
permitted . 

7. OPEN SPACE REQUIREMENTS 

At least 25 percent of the total area, or two acres of such tract, which- 
ever is greater, shall, except as provided below, remain unbuilt upon and 
set aside for conservation, outdoor recreation or park purposes or buffer 
areas. Such open land shall be in addition to required front, side, and 
rear yards and may be in one or more parcels of a size and shape appro- 
priate for the intended use and may be conveyed either to and accepted 
by the Town or its Conservation Commission, to a legal association com- 
prised of the homeowners within such tract, or to a non-profit organization 
the principal purpose of which is the conservation of open space. Such 
open land shall be included in the total tract area for the purpose of 
computing dwelling unit density of the tract. When such open land is 
conveyed to persons other than the Town of Andover , the Town shall be 
granted an easement over such land sufficient to insure its perpetual 
use as conservation, recreation or park land or buffer area. A maximum 
of 20 percent of such open land may be devoted to paved areas and structures 
used for or accessory to active outdoor recreation and consistent with the 
open spaces uses of such land. 

8. PLANNING BOARD REPORT TO TOWN MEETING 

The Planning Board, in its report to the Town Meeting required by law, 
shall include its opinion of whether or not the proponent has prepared 
sufficient data to give reasonable assurance that the development will 



95 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 20, 1980 

conform to the site development plan with respect to the location, 
layout and design of proposed buildings, drives and streets, to the 
density, type and design of floor plans and dwelling units, and with 
respect to the anticipated selling price or rental (as the case may 
be), if included in the presentation to Town Meeting. 

9. SPECIAL PERMIT APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS 

The application to the Planning Board for a special permit under this 
section shall be accompanied by the following plans and supporting 
materials : 

a. Plan of the tract showing topography, existing streets and 
structures within and contiguous to the tract. 

b. Where a subdivision of land is involved, a preliminary sub- 
division plan, which may be combined with the plan required 
under the preceding paragraph. 

c. Site development plans showing the proposed grading of the 
tract and the proposed locations, dimensions, materials and 
types of construction of streets, drives, parking areas, 
walks, paved areas, utilities, open space, planting, screening 
landscaping, and other improvements and the locations and out- 
lines of proposed buildings. 

d. Preliminary architectural drawings for building plans including 
typical floor plans, elevations and sections. 

e. A tabulation of proposed buildings by type, size (number of 
rooms, floor area), ground coverage and summary showing the 
percentages of the tract to be occupied by buildings, parking 
and other paved vehicular areas, and the amount of open space. 

f. An order of conditions issued by the Conservation Commission or 
a determination by the Conservation Commission that conditions 
are not necessary. 

10. DIFFERENT SITE DEVELOPMENT PLANS 

In the event that a developer proposes to develop a tract of land in 
a TC district according to site development plans which the Planning 
Board determines are substantially different from the site develop- 
ment plans presented at the time the Town Meeting voted to include 
such land in the TC district, such different site development plans 
shall first be presented to and receive the approval of the Town 
Meeting by a vote of two-thirds of those present and voting, prior 
to any action thereon by the Planning Board. 

11. SPECIAL PERMIT PROVISIONS 

The Planning Board may grant a special permit for the development of 
any tract of land in a TC district, based on a determination that the 
proposed development will be consistent with the development as approved 
by the Town Meeting and consistent with the general objectives of the 
TC district development, and subject to the following standards: 

a. The special permit shall incorporate by reference building de- 
sign and site development plans presented to the Town Meeting. 
The Planning Board may, in its discretion, permit deviations 
from the site development plans presented to the Town Meeting, 
provided, however, that the Board shall not permit any increase 
in the dwelling unit density. In no event shall dwelling unit 
density exceed four units per acre. 



96 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 20, 1980 

b. The Planning Board may permit the construction and use of 
facilities such as a community center or recreation center, 
including but not limited to swimming and tennis facilities, 
primarily for the use of residents of the tract, if the Board 
determines that the inclusion of such facilities would be 
appropriate by reason of such factors as the size of the tract, 
the number of its residents and its geographical location. 

c. In granting a special permit, the Planning Board shall impose 
as a condition thereof that the installation of municipal ser- 
vices and construction of interior drives within the TC develop- 
ment shall comply with the requirements of the Planning Board's 
Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land , and may 
impose such additional conditions and safeguards as public safety 
welfare and convenience may require, except that a minor street 
shall be able to serve up to twenty dwelling units. 

12. AMENDMENT AND REVISION OF SPECIAL PERMIT 

a. Amendment 

The Planning Board, on application by the developer and after a 
public hearing, may amend a special permit previously granted, 
but only in accordance with the standards hereinbefore set out. 

b . Revision 

Subsequent to a special permit granted by the Planning Board 
under the provisions of this section, minor revisions may be 
made from time to time in accordance with applicable laws, 
by-laws and regulations, but the development under such 
special permit shall otherwise be in accordance with the 
submission accompanying the developer's application for a 
special permit. 

13. DENIAL OF SPECIAL PERMIT 

The Planning Board may deny any application for special permit here- 
under and base its denial upon: 

a. A failure to meet the standards established by this section 
of the By-Law. 

b. A finding that the proposed development does not substantially 
conform to the plans for the development of the tract presented 
to the Town Meeting in connection with the proposed rezoning of 
the tract to TC. 

On Petition of Sidney P. White and others. 

Reports from the Board of Selectmen, Planning Board and Finance Committee 
will be given at the Town Meeting. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Teplitz. 

ARTICLE 1 was DEFEATED. 

The Vote YES — 255 NO — 574. Less than the 2/3 required. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by 
changing the Zoning Classification of two certain parcels shown as Parcels 
#4 and #4G on Assessors' Map 93 from Single Residence B to TC (Townhouse 
Cluster) . 

On petition of Sidney P. White and others. 
Article 2 was withdrawn. 



97 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - NOVEMBER 20, 1980 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Andover Zoning By-Law 
as amended so as to see if the Town will vote to amend and to change from 
Single Resident (sic) "A" to General Business Zone a tract of land with all 
buildings thereon of H. William Gurry, Trustree (sic) of Clover Leaf Realty 
Trust situated in said Andover, located at 131 Main Street, and being shown 
on "Survey of Land in Andover, Mass., for Rose A. Chapman, August 1925, D.W. 
Clark, C.E." duly recorded with North Essex Registry of Deeds as Plan #617, 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Main Street, 65.24 feet; southeasterly by Morton 
Street, 53.6 feet; southwesterly by land now or formerly of Chandler, 
45.75 feet; northwesterly by the same, 4.25 feet; southwesterly by 
the same, 21 feet; and northwesterly by land now or formerly of Davidson 
and a four (4) feet right of way, 49 feet. 

Said parcel is shown as Parcel 11 on Assessors Map 40 and is presently zoned 
Single Residence "A" . 

On petition of H. William Gurry and others. 

Reports from the Board of Selectmen, Planning Board and Finance Committee 
will be given at Town Meeting. 

A report of the Andover Planning Board was read by Paul Gravallese. 
ARTICLE 3 was DEFEATED. 
The Vote YES — 271 NO — 343. Less than the 2/3 required. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Daniels and duly seconded it was VOTED to 
dissolve the 1980 Special Town Meeting at 10:00 P.M. 

The foregoing is a true record of the doings of the meeting. 

ATTEST 



Elden R. Salter, CMC 
Town Clerk 



98 



BORROWING CAPACITY OF THE TOWN, DEC. 28, 1980 

State Equalized Value $ 649,700,000.00 

Borrowing capacity 5% 32,485,000.00 

Town Debt as of 12/28/80 $12,035,000.00 
LESS DEBT OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 



1963 Accelerated Sewer 120,000.00 

1966 New High School 975,000.00 

1966 Fish Brook 200,000.00 

1967 Water Bonds 60,000.00 
1967 Bancroft School 565,000.00 

1967 High School - Add. 270,000.00 

1968 West Elem-Add. 880,000.00 
1968 Water Mains 30,000.00 
1971 Water Treatment Plant 1,170,000.00 
1973 Shaw.-Doherty Add. 285,000.00 

1975 Sewers 1,725,000.00 

1976 Water Storage Res. 675,000.00 

1979 Water Mains 1,965,000.00 $8,920,000.00 

TOWN DEBT INSIDE DEBT LIMIT: 



1966 Municipal Bldgs . 275,000.00 

1967 Public Safety Center 180,000.00 

1968 Sewers 175,000.00 
1968 Land Aquisition 70,000.00 
1976 Conservation Land 600,000.00 
1979 Sewers 1,140,000.00 
1979 School Plans 540,000.00 

1979 Bancroft Roof 135,000.00 $3,115,000.00 



BORROWING CAPACITY 12/28/80 $29,370,000.00 



VOTED - NOT BONDED - SCHOOL 

RENOVATIONS 11,000,000.00 



HEWLETT PACKARD LOAN 173,776.70 



99 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



Distributions and Reimbursements from the State 
Loss of Taxes, State Owned Land 

G.L. Ch. 58, ss. 13-17B 
Abatements, G.L. Ch. 59, s. 5: 

Widows and Others, Clause 17 & 37 

Blind Persons, Clause 37 

Elderly Persons, Clause 41, 1977, 

Ch. 967, S.2 

Education : 

School Aid G.L. Ch. 70 
Regional Public Libraries, 

G.L. Ch. 78, s.19c 
Transportation of Pupils, 

G. L. Ch. 71, ss7A and 37D 
Construction of School Projects, 

1948, Ch. 645; 1976, Ch. 511 
Special Needs Recreation, 

G.L. Ch. 71B, s.ll 
Tuition for State Wards, G.L. Ch. 76, 

ss. 7&9, G.L. Ch. 74, s . 74 

Reimbursements for Direct Expenditure: 
Public Libraries, G.L. Ch. 78, sl9A 
School Lunch Program, 1970, Ch . 871 
Elderly Lunch Program, 

G.L. Ch. 15, s.lL, 1970, Ch. 753 

General Government: 

Veterans' Benefirs, G.L. Ch. 115, s.6 
Highway Reconstruction and Maintenance 
Local Aid Fund (Additional Assistance) 
Local Aid Fund (Lottery, Beano, Charity 

Games) G.L. Ch. 29, S.2D 
Highway Fund G.L. Ch. 81, s.31 

1971, Ch. 497 



58,414.42 

1,750.00 
1,575.00 

29,864.72 



1,645,342.00 

64,200.96 

180,455.00 

257,292.50 

1,141.00 

6,647.00 



9,768.75 
135,243.19 

18,266.38 



4,857.32 
161,558.29 
315,254.00 

138,962.00 

197,068.00 



3,227,660.53 



100 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP 1 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES (cont.) 



Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise Taxes 
Levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 

Licenses : 

Dog License Fees 

Liquor Licenses 

Marriage Licenses 

Fishing and Hunting 

Miscellaneous Licenses 

Birth, Death Certificates, Etc. 

Business Certificates 

U.C.C. Fees 

Miscellaneous Fees 

Fines 

Special Assessments: 

Apportioned Sewer Paid in Advance 
Apportioned Sewer Added: 

Levy of 1978 

Levy of 1979 

Levy of 1980 
Apportioned Water Paid in Advance 
Apportioned Water Added: 

Levy of 1980 
Committed Interest Paid in Advance 
Committed Interest Added: 

Levy of 1978 

Levy of 1979 

Levy of 1980 
Unapportioned Street 



195.68 

708.91 

31,807.89 

721,107.80 

1,227,109.69 



5,839.60 

29,095.00 

776.00 

236.70 

3,525.61 

1,943.00 

29.50 

1,683.00 

2,656.45 



4,065.67 

223.42 

334.72 

18,324.43 

1,000.00 

1,657.97 
164.57 

80.48 

115.68 

4,717.31 

800.00 



1,980,929.97 



45,784.86 
81,265.79 



31,484.25 



101 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 



REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES 



(cont . ) 



General Government: 
Betterment Discharges 
Certificates of Lien 
Sale of Coins 

Town Manager - Miscellaneous 
Demands 

Planning Board 
Conservation 
Board of Appeals 

Protection of Persons and Property 
Pistol Licenses 
I. D. Cards 
Damages 

Dog Officer - Administration 
Bike Stickers 
Facility Stickers 
Miscellaneous 
Building Inspection 
Electrical Inspection 
Certificates of Inspection 
General Inspection 
Fire Department 
Weights and Measures 
Ambulance Charges 

Health and Sanitation: 
Health 

Plumbing Inspection 
Gas Inspection 

Veterans' Services 

School : 
Damages 
Miscellaneous 



24.00 
8,343.15 
337.44 
1,274.62 
10,706.00 
3,763.09 
3,587.34 
1,911.20 



1,930.00 

250.00 

165.00 

2,308.00 

113.00 

5.00 

571.42 

154,382.50 

31,222.04 

3,546.25 

565.00 

45.00 

465.60 

5,075.00 



18,429.20 
7,807.00 
3,419.00 



489.37 
484.44 



29,946.84 



200,643.81 

29,655.20 
7,252.87 

973.81 






Recreation : 
Registrations 
Rentals 
Concessions 
Special Programs 
Council on Aging 
Miscellaneous 



39,399.40 
8,806.00 
5,596.82 

28,518.75 
9,350.30 
2,951.60 



94,622.87 



102 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP I 
RECEIPTS INCLUDED IN ASSESSORS' ESTIMATES (cont.) 



Public Service Enterprises 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Liens, 1978 
Liens, 1979 
Liens, 1980 
Service Liens 



1,119,013.24 

87,616.50 

498.77 

750.01 

26,944.16 

120.37 



1,234,943.05 



Cemeteries : 
Interments 
Foundations 



8,223.00 
1,413.00 



9,636.00 



Libraries : 
Photocopies 
Fines 

Non-Resident Fees 
Lost and Damaged Books 
Rentals 
Miscellaneous 



6,259.90 

433.24 

20.00 

1,898.69 
142.00 
434.53 



9,188.36 



Interest : 

Revenue Funds 
Non-Revenue Funds 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Taxes and Assessments 
Tax Titles 



559,682.15 
257,773.89 

1,629.34 
33,800.91 

5,222.95 



858,109.24 



Farm Animal Excise Taxes 
Levy of 1980 



421.00 



421.00 



Andover Housing Authority 
Lieu of Taxes 



2,016.00 



2,016.00 



7,844,534.45 



103 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP II 
OTHER ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Tax Title Redemptions 42,080.28 

Tax Title Costs 264.60 

Dog Funds - Care and Custody 1,400.00 

Insurance Claims 7,109.75 
Refunds : 

Departmental 10,008.08 

Miscellaneous 8,519.62 

Sale of Equipment 4,341.20 
Recycling : 

Paper 1,254.76 

Glass 1,824.94 

State Reimbursement - Recreation 38,416.89 

State Reimbursement - Natural Resources 150,557.73 

Insurance Refunds 12,668.00 
Chapter 90 - Highways : 

State 114,454.86 

County 29,664.53 

Miscellaneous 1,790.13 



424,355.37 



104 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP III 
AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Personal Property Taxes: 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 



84.10 

6,395.46 

726,836.55 



733,316.11 



Real Estate Taxes 
Levy of 1977 
Levy of 1978 
Levy of 1979 
Levy of 1980 



890.31 

40,057.96 

204,132.99 

16,477,685.73 



16,722,766.99 



Dog Licenses to County 
Dog Licenses from County 
Sale of Dogs 

Off Street Parking Meters 
School Lunch Program 
Andover Athletic Program 
Cemetery Perpetual Cares 
Cemetery Sale of Lots 



4,140.40 

2,987.78 

51.00 

2,465.84 

365,501.78 

15,664.63 

8,419.00 

6,261.00 



Trust Funds Interest: 

Spring Grove Cemetery Fund 
Flower Funds 
Miscellaneous Funds 



20,646.61 

895.00 

5,638.37 



Revenue Cash Investments 

Non-Revenue Cash Investments 

Payroll Deductions: 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Blue Cross and Blue Shield 

Group Life Insurance 

Group Life Insurance - Optional 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

United Fund 



25,486,679.78 
15,844,000.00 



2,333,821.21 

660,741.14 

245,373.80 

7,366.54 

16,977.58 

11,780.00 

7,285.32 



105 



TOWN OF ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 

REVENUE 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1980 

GROUP III 
AGENCY AND REVENUE ACCOUNTS (cont.) 



Tailings 

Library - Title I Grant 

Police Off Duty Work Details 

Fire Off Duty Work Details 

Police Legal Advisor 

Sale of Trash Bags 

Meals Tax 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 

Grants 

Investment Income 
EPA Funds : 

Grants 

Investment Income 
Sewer Rates 
Sewer Liens Added to Taxes : 

Levy of 1978 

Levy of 1979 

Levy of 1980 
Mass. Historical Commission - State 
Elderly Affairs - State 
School Lunch Program - Elderly 
Guaranty Deposits 
Sale of Land 
School Aid: 

P L 874 

Title IVB E S E A 

Project 79-042N 

Project 300-780-422 

Project 80-009-103 

Project 80-223N 

Project 80-009-383N 

P L 94-482 Food Management 

LEA Incentive Grant 

Project 80-009-505-138-2 
Proceeds from Bond Issue 
Premium on Bond Issue 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 



1 


135.32 


9 


120.00 


169 


319.40 




175.23 


7 


153.64 


58 


132.00 


1 


474.18 


446 


602.00 


20 


132.10 


67 


600.00 




870.83 


398 


015.69 




107.46 


1 


163.24 


9 


343.86 


4 


101.00 


1 


794.00 




665.15 


81 


000.00 




3 50.00 


23 


531.94 


17 


605.25 


1 


540.00 


84 


157.06 


49 


493.00 


35 


700.00 


107 


,450.00 


13 


828.00 


16 


488.00 


2 


201.00 


4,360 


000.00 




245.03 


8 


029.67 


68,501 


303.93 



GROUP I 

II 

III 

Grand Total 



7,844,534.45 

424,355.37 

68,501,303.93 

76,770,193.75 



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& £ 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 
Year Ending June 30, 1980 



Employees' Payroll Deductions: 

Federal Withholding Taxes 2,346,722.58 

State Withholding Taxes 664,488.82 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 247,582.32 

Group Life Insurance 24,353.28 

United Fund 8,640.21 

U. S. Savings Bonds 12,645.00 

School Aid: 

Project 300-780-422 55,268.38 

Project 790-009-595-02-72 2,059.77 

Distributive Ed Project 054-2 782.01 

ED 79-042N 8,791.18 

Project 79-009-103 42,406.60 

Project 79-009-001N 47,090.74 

Title IV-ESEA 2,069.71 

Project Oral History OH-1 3,392.50 

Project 80-009-103 148.54 

Project 80-009-505-138-2 69.30 

State and County Assessments: 

County Tax 576,699.05 

State Parks and Reservations 138,567.52 

Audit of Municipal Accounts 1,610.90 

Examination of Retirement System 656.27 

Ipswich River Watershed District 661.29 

Air Pollution Control 3,675.74 

Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 3,252.90 

Group Insurance - Elderly 999.99 

Group Insurance - Retired Teachers 32,976.00 

Merrimack Valley RTA 7,030.00 

Refunds : 

Real Estate Taxes 99,833.89 

Personal Property Taxes 206.35 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 49,561.86 

Water Rates and Services 1,709.73 

Sewer Charges 663.79 

Miscellaneous 10,641.21 



121 



EXPENDITURES FOR AGENCY AND MISCELLANEOUS ACCOUNTS 
Year Ending June 30, 1980 (cont.) 



Off Duty Work Details: 

Police 164,104.58 

Fire 127.44 

School 1,677.50 

Trust Funds 6,252.87 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Funds 12,140.00 

Purchase of Trash Bags 87,887.61 

Dog Licenses to County 6,868.35 

Sale of Dogs 54.00 

Walter Raymond Fund 121.00 

Lucy Shaw Fund 594.02 

Library - Fed Project L S C A 11,530.93 
Revenue Cash Investments 27,232,774.70 
Non-Revenue Cash Investments 17,772.600.00 

Federal Revenue Sharing Cash Investments 447,086.00 

Insurance Claim Recoveries 4,964.20 
School Lunch Program: 

Personal Services 206,362.95 

Other Expenses 354,158.90 

Andover Athletic Program 13,972.90 

Tailings 100.00 

Meals Tax 1,472.22 

Loans in Anticipation of Bond Issue 925,000.00 

Guaranty Deposits 1,581.00 

Court Judgements 31,191.08 

51,677,879.68 



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TRANSFERS FROM COMPENSATION PLAN ACCOUNT 
Year Ending June 30, 1980 



Town Manager 


$ 


400.00 


Data Processing 




945.00 


Town Clerk 


2 


401.00 


Elections & Registrations 


1 


299.00 


Veterans Services 


2 


644.00 


Municipal Buildings 


1 


569.00 


Police 


8 


814.00 


Fire 


82 


274.00 


DPW Administration 


4 


254.00 


Solid Waste 




810.00 


Water 


6 


987.00 


Forestry 


6 


487.00 


Engineering 


3 


,718.00 


Cemetery 


3 


887.00 


Community Development & 






Planning 


12 


,711.00 


Treasurer/Collector 


4 


273.00 


Assessing 


4 


,448.00 


Town Accountant 


3 


,055.00 


Library 


17 


,196.00 


Community Services 


8 


,350.00 


Council on Aging 


1 


,380.00 


Retirement 


1 


,265.00 


Animal Control 




473.00 


Central Purchasing 




360.00 



$180,000.00 



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130 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1980 

Net Funded and 
Fixed Debt Article 1, 1963-Sewer APW 46G 160,000.00 

Article 8, 1964-High School 975,000.00 
Article 6, 1965-Fish Brook 200,000.00 

13,715,000.00 Article 11, 1965-Municipal 

Buildings 275,000.00 

Article 1, 1967-Bancrof t 

School 660,000.00 

Article 1, 1966 and Article 3, 

1967-High School 315,000.00 

Article 13, 1967-Water 

System Projects 120,000.00 

Article 16, 1967-Municipal 

Buildings 210,000.00 

Article 8B, 1968 and Article 17, 

1968-West and Bancroft 990,000.00 

Article 10, 1967-Land 

Acquisition 75,000.00 

Article 4A, 1967 and Article 32, 

1968-Water Projects 45,000.00 

Article 4B, 1967 and Article 16, 

1968-Sewer Projects 205,000.00 

Article 19A and 3B, 1969- Sewer 

Project Lowell & Summer Sts . 20,000.00 

Article 5, 1968 and Article 2B, 

1969-Water Project- Lowe 11 St. 15,000.00 

Article 14, 1969-Munic ipal 

Buildings 10,000.00 

Article 26, 1970-Water 

Treatment Plant 1,365,000.00 

Article 15, 1973-Shawsheen & 

Doherty School Renovations 385,000.00 

Article 17, 1973-Sewer 

West Andover 1,840,000.00 

Article 10A, 1975-Plans 

Water Distribution 30,000.00 

Article 8, 1976-Water 

Reservoir & Mains 725,000.00 

Article 47,1976-Land 

Acquisition 645,000.00 

Article 9, 1977-Water Mains 90,000.00 

Article 9, 1978-Article 12, 1978- 

Article 17, 1978-Article 40, 

1979-Water Mains 2,185,000.00 

Article 60, 1978-School Plans 720,000.00 

Article 32, 1979-Article 47, 

1979-Sewer Projects 1,270,000.00 

Article 52, 1979-Bancrof t 185,000.00 

13,715,000.00 13,715,000.00 



131 



DEFERRED REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1980 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 
Not Due 71,681.84 



Apportioned Water Assessments 
Not Due 15,481.87 



Suspended Sewer Assessments 

9,653.03 

Suspended Water Assessments 

2,341.66 



Apportioned Sewer Assessments 

Revenue Due in 1979 

to 1995 Inclusive 71,681.84 

Apportioned Water Assessments 

Revenue Due in 1979 

to 1996 Inclusive 15,481.87 

Suspended Sewer Assessments 

9,653.03 

Suspended Water Assessments 

2,341.66 



99,158.40 



99,158.40 



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137 



ANDOVER CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT SYSTEM 
December 31, 1980 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1980 

Receipts : 

Payroll Deductions $ 311,365.80 

Make-up Payments 4,102.34 
Transfers from 

Other Systems 4,699.92 

Appropriations 605,359.00 

Investment Income 264,318.99 

Sale of Investments 170,463 o 12 



86,221.10 



1,360,309.17 



Disbursements 

Administrative Expense: 

Salaries 13,403.01 

Other Expenses 2,758.27 

Refunds of Accumulated 

Deposits 77,825.83 

Annuities Paid 72,473.07 

Pensions Paid 622,400.93 

Purchase of Securities 700,282.00 
Accrued Interest on Bonds 4,078.40 
Pension Reimbursements to 

Other Systems 11,843.22 

Transfer of Accounts to 

Other Systems 742.18 






1,505,806.91 



Cash Balance, December 31, 1980 



$ (59,276.64) 






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143 



DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
ELECTIVE 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

James Abramson, Chairman - 1981 

Norma A. Gammon, Vice Chairman - 1982 

Susan T. Poore, Secretary - 1982 

Edward M. Harris - 1983 

Gerald H. Silverman - 1983 

TOWN MODERATOR 

James D. Doherty - 1981 

TRUSTEES, CORNELL FUND 

Charles F. Dalton, Chairman - 1983 

Alcide J. LeGendre - 1982 

John M. Murray - 1981 

TRUSTEES, PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
William V. Emmons - 1982 
Earl G. Efinger - 1982 
Rev. Westy Egmont 
Joan M. Lewis - 1982 
Rev. Otis W. Maxfield 
John R. Petty - 1982 
Margaret R. Porter - 1982 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Elaine F. Viehmann, Chairman - 1981 
John S. Eaton - 1982 
Joseph A. Finn - 1982 
Donald W. Robb - 1983 
Richard E. Neal - 1983 

ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Winston A. Blake, Chairman - 1983 

Thomas P. Eldred - 1981 

Mary Jane Powell* 

Richard A. Savrann - 1983 

Thomas R. Wallace - 1984 

♦Appointed by Commissioner of Depart- 
ment of Community Affairs (State) of 
June 24 ) 1981 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

James A. Booth, Andover - 1982 

John P. Ford, Lawrence 

Patrick McCarthy, Lawrence 

Joseph F. Sweeney, Lawrence 

Terrence Breen, Methuen 

John W. Regan, Methuen 

John F. Caffrey, III, North Andover 



APPOINTIVE 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Donn B. Byrne, Chairman - 1983 
Jordan J. Burgess - 1981 
Timothy D. Driscoll - 1981 
Ruth T. Dunbar - 1982 
Donald K. Ellsworth - 1982 
Frederick P. Fitzgerald - 1983 
Joanne F. Marden - 1982 
John J. Sullivan - 1981 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Archibald D. Maclaren, Chairman 

William H. Russell 

John J. McCoy 

BOARD OF RETIREMENT 
William T. Downs, Chairman 
Wendell A. Mattheson, Secretary 
Leo F. Daley 

TOWLE FUND 
Marilyn R. Brodie 
Philip F. Sullivan 
Ruth E. Wescott 

MERRIMACK VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 
George S. Moran 
Paul V. Teplitz 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

Wesley E. Whitney, Chairman - 1982 

Jane E. Griswold - 1981 

Ernest N. Hall - 1981 

Richard H. Moody - 1983 

Carol C. McDonough - 1983 

Associate Members: 

Elaine Katz - 1981 

Roger W. Collins - 1982 

R. Paul Meunier - 1983 

Alan E. Gould - 1982 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
Dr. Douglas Dunbar, Chairman 
Dr. James P. Kartell 
Joseph P. Madden 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 
Clarence Johnson (American Legion) 
John J. Lewis (Veterans' Service Agent) 
Joseph L. Monan (V.F.W.) 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Virginia H. Cole 
Philip A. Dargie 
Joseph Walsh 
Elden R. Salter 

GREATER LAWRENCE SANITARY DISTRICT 
Robert E. McQuade 



144 



TRUSTEES, MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Cornelia W. LeMaitre, Chairman 

Robert G. Butler 

Patricia D. Dye 

Edward I. Erickson (Emeritus) 

Joseph A. Glasser 

Marta B. Hornidge 

Richard G. Asoian 

Richard C. MacGowan 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Robert A. Pustell, Chairman 

Terrance L. Campbell 

James O'Day 

Dr. Edward W. Lenoe 

Ellen T. Marcus 

Martha J. Dares 

Ronald F. Shepard 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Philip K. Allen, Chairman 
Stanley Butcher 
Lawrence Gross 
Franklin K. Haggerty 
John D. Lewis 
Marsha E. Rooney 
Margaret H. Thompson 

COMMITTEE ON TOWN TRUST FUNDS 

Robert M. Foster 
Andrew F. Shea 
Myron H. Muise 

TRAFFIC COMMITTEE 

Town Engineer John Avery 
Town Manager Jared S. A. Clark 
Police Chief James Johnson 
Francis J. Trombly 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 

Dr. Lawrence Spiegel, Chairman 
George J. Fantini, Jr. 
Robert Finlayson 
S. Joseph Hoffman 
Dorothy Sherrerd 
Dr. Thomas J. Swift 
Susan C. Tucker 
George Ziady 



ANDOVER ARTS COUNCIL 

Carolyn B. Ehrman , Chairman 
Keith H. Gould 
Robert T. King 
Susan M. Lenoe 
Corinne M. Staid 
Elizabeth M. Wasserboehr 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Lawrence S. Spiegel 
Jared S. A. Clark 
Robert Finlayson 
Dorothy Sherrerd 
George Ziady 

DESIGN ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Dennis R. St. John, Chairman 

Anthony S. DiDio 

Rachel Garcia 

Bruce Moody 

G. Warren Patterson 

LOCAL PROPERTY TAX RELIEF COMMITTEE 

Ruth H. Dunbar 
John S . Eaton 
Joanne F. Marden 
Don P. Scott 
Philip J. Salamone 
Milton Greenberg 
George H. Neilson 
George Forsythe 
William A. Munroe 

PLANNING BOARD 

Paul Teplitz, Chairman 
Francis J. McBride 
David M. Gravallese 
Andrew W. Girdwood, Jr. 
John G. Tomlinson 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Thomas F. Powers, Chairman 

James A. Booth 

Florence McGrath 

Don P. Scott 

Isabella Hurst 

John B. McAllister 

Elsie Mowat 

H. Sandy Brown, Alternate 

COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMITTEE 

Kenneth L. DeBenedictis , Chairman 

Joyce B. Andrews 

Douglas F. Mitchell 

Thomas F. Powers 

Joan M. Rosenblatt 

Ronald Thorpe, Jr. 

CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Reginald L. Marden, Chairman 
James Caldwell 
John F. Sweeney 



145 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Kenneth Gropper , Chairman 
Robert B. Mclntyre 
Virginia H. Cole 
Paul R. Curley 
Francis J. Hill 
Richard E. Landry 
William A. Munroe 
Laura Grams 
Donald S. Robb 



Alternates 

Laura Scileppi 
Robert Mattedi 
John Sullivan 



Resource Bank 

Sandra N. Chateauneuf 
Mark DeLisio 
John Doyle 
Alfred E. Hart 
Howard McKew 
Lewis Stella, Jr. 



$£$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 

Paul E. Tsongas, 2003F, JFK Federal Bldg., Boston 
Edward M. Kennedy, 1702 P.O. Bldg., Boston 



SECOND ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 1 , 2, 3, 4, and 5 



Patricia McGovern - 74 Saunders St. Lawrence 



FIRST ESSEX AND MIDDLESEX DISTRICT - PRECINCTS 6, 7, and 8 



Robert C. Buell, Rm 516, State House, Boston 



SEVENTEENTH ESSEX DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 



Gerald M. Cohen, 5 William Street, Andover 



FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 



James M. Shannon, 352 Merrimac St., Lowell 



FIFTH COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 



John F. Markey, 246 Tunrpike Road, North Andover 



146 



DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT HEADS AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1980 



Animal Inspector „ Richard D. Lindsay, D.V.M, 

Assessor William H. Russell 

Civil Defense Director James F. Johnson 

Collector-Treasurer Myron H. Muise 

Director, Memorial Hall Library Nancy C. Jacobson 

Director, Community Development and Planning Rhys G. Kear 

Director, Community Services Joan S. Pearson 

Director, Finance and Budget Anthony J. Torrisi 

Director, Public Health Everett F. Penney, Jr. 

Director, Public Works Robert E. McQuade 

Dog Officer Donald V. Porter 

Fire Chief William T. Downs 

Forestry Superintendent James L. Bamf ord 

Game Warden Forrest H. Noyes , Jr. 

Deputy Game Warden James V. Deyermond 

Deputy Game Warden Eugene A . Za 11a , Jr . 

General Construction Inspector James J. Rand, Jr. 

Highway Superintendent Robert T. Volker 

Hous ing Authority Executive Director Thomas P. Walsh 

Inspector of Buildings Sam J. DeSalvo 

Asst. Inspector of Building David W. Pattullo 

Inspector of Wires Kenneth Smigliani 

Asst. Inspector of Wires Gilbert DeMoor 

Plumbing, Gas and Sewer Inspector Harold A. Rutter, Jr. 

Police Chief James F . Johnson 

Purchasing Agent John W. Aulson 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Charles P. Howe 

Superintendent of Schools Dr . Kenneth R . Seif ert 

Superintendent of Spring Grove Cemetery Stephan J. Bamford 

Town Accountant Wendell A . Mattheson 

Town Clerk Elden R. Salter 

Asst. Town Clerk Olga Palenski 

Town Counsel Alfred L. Daniels 

Asst. Town Counsel Fredric S. O'Brien 

Town Engineer John Avery 

Town Manager Jared S . A . Clark 

Town Constables Thomas P. Eldred and 

Willard M. Walsh 

Veterans' Service Agent John J. Lewis 

Water and Sewer Superintendent Ernest J. Cote 



147 



INDEX 



Animal Inspection 50 

Assessors 16 

AVIS 25 

Board of Selectmen 4 

Central Purchasing 24 

Civil Defense 24 

Collector/Treasurer 14 

Community Development & Planning. . 29 

Planning Board 30 

Board of Health 30 

Zoning Board of Appeals 34 

Conservation Commission 35 

Building Inspection 36 

Electrical Inspection 38 

Plumbing & Gas Inspection. ... 39 

Inspection Services 39 

Community Services 46 

Council on Aging 49 

Development and Industrial 

Commission 26 

Director of Department Heads. . . . 147 

Directory of Town Officials .... 144 

Dog Officer 23 

Finance and Budget 10 

Financial Statements 99 

Fire Department 20 

Greater Lawrence Mental Health 

Center 50 



Greater Lawrence Psychological 
Center 

Greater Lawrence Regional Voca- 
tional Technical High School, , . 



■ 



51 



Greater Lawrence Sanitary District. 

Historical Commission 

Housing Authority 45 

John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund. ... 26 

Jury List 58 

Margaret G. Towle Fund 12 

Memorial Hall Library 27 

Police Department 22 

Public Works 51 

Engineering 51 

Water 52 

Sewer 53 

Highway 54 

Vehicle Maintenance 55 

Parks 55 

Forestry 56 

Spring Grove Cemetery 56 

Sale of Property 57 

Town Clerk 11 

Town Counsel 12 

Town Manager 8 

Town Meeting Minutes 63 

Trustees Punchard Free School. ... 13 

Veterans' Services 40 






1981 

oAnnual 
c R§port 



^nniQ. 




Towri of 
oAndoveif 



Annual 
Report 
for the 
Town of 
Andover 

1981 

(January 1, 1981 through 
December 31, 1981) 



Prepared by the 
Town Manager 



Pursuant to the Provisions of 
Chapter 40, Section 49 
of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
and Article II, Section Four 
of the By-Laws of the 
Town of Andover 



•' 




Board of Selectmen 



Town Hall, 20 Main Street 
01810 



March 8, 1982 



Fellow Citizens of Andover: 

A number of important developments affecting your town 
government occurred during the year 1981. 

As noted in last year's report, the passage of Article 2 (the 
so-called "Proposition 2 1/2") by a large plurality at the General 
Election of November 4, 1980, introduced a number of requirements 
which had the effect of placing a limit on possible increases in 
budget expenditures as well as in the magnitude of property taxes 
to be levied. The reduction in motor vehicle excise taxes alone 
reduced town income from that source for 1982 by some $600,000. 

At the Town Election on March 23, 1981, Donn B. Byrne, former 
Chairman of the Finance Committee, was elected Selectman for a 
three-year term, Selectman James L. Abramson having declined to run 
for a second term. Selectman Norma A. Gammon was elected Chairman 
of the Board; Selectman Gerald H. Silverman, Vice-chairman; and 
Selectman Edward M. Harris, Secretary. 

The Town Manager, Jared S. A. Clark, continued into his third 
year in this capacity to direct the operations of the town 
government. However, on June 1, 1981, he submitted his resignation 
to the Board of Selectmen to become effective June 30th. The Board 
accepted his resignation, which was in accordance with the terms of 
his contract, with regret and found itself faced with finding a 
replacement . 

Because of the uncertainty surrounding the amount of state aid 
to be received for 1981-82, in light of the terms of "Proposition 2 
1/2," the Annual Town Meeting was postponed until May 26, 1981, in 
order to insure, insofar as possible, the accuracy of the town 
budget for 1982. 

The individual reports of Town Departments will be found to 
follow successively this introduction. 

The town government relies heavily upon volunteer boards and 
committees for the conduct of its business. The Board of Selectmen 
again wishes to call the attention of registered voters who have 
the time and the inclination to consider enrolling in the Town 
Talent Bank by obtaining the necessary form from the Town Manager's 
Office in the Town Hall, 20 Main Street. Your services will be 
welcomed . 

Norma A. Gammon, Chairman 

Gerald H. Silverman, Vice-chairman 

Edward M. Harris, Secretary 

Susan T. Poore 

Donn B. Byrne 



Board of Selectmen 



The year 1981 was a busy one for the Board of Selectmen. At 
the General Election on November 4, 1980, the voters of the state 
approved a referendum placed on the ballot by a group known as 
Citizens for Limited Taxation which, inter alia, placed a ceiling 
of 2 1/2% on the annual increase in tax levies , reduced motor 
vehicle excise taxes and eliminated School Committee fiscal 
autonomy. This legislation has been known as "Proposition 2 1/2." 
It has had a powerful effect on town and school fiscal planning. 

During 1981 the Board met in 28 regular meetings and 22 
special meetings, but held only one conference session, other such 
sessions occurring during the meetings. In addition there were the 
three-day Annual Town Meeting and one Special Town Meeting on June 
8, 1981. 

At its meeting on January 12, 1982, the Board set the dates 
for the annual election of officers at March 23, 1982, and for the 
first business session of the Annual Town Meeting at Tuesday, May 
26, 1981. The delay in the latter was due to the belief that the 
state would need extra time to adjust its plans for local aid due 
to the passage of "Proposition 2 1/2." The Annual Town Meeting 
sessions were held on March 23, 1982, (the election of officers), 
on May 26, and on June 1, 2 and 8, 1981, at the Memorial auditorium 
of the East Junior High School. 

The Special Town Meeting held on November 20, 1980, having 
rejected a proposed privately prepared bylaw providing for 
multi-family housing, the Board of Selectmen committed itself to 
the development of a more thoroughly researched bylaw to be 
presented to the Annual Town Meeting of 1981 . 

The matter of the sale of bonds to finance the School Building 
Program was a continuing problem throughout the year, as the rates 
of interest climbed and investors concentrated their attention on 
short term issues and other forms of new high interest investments. 
In substitution for the bonds it became necessary to rely on the 
issuance of Bond Anticipation Notes to finance the program. The 
following amounts were approved by the Board during the year: March 
30, 1981, $100,000 @ 6.46%; July 6, 1981, $200,000 @ 7.65% & 7.75%; 
August 17, 1981, $900,000 @ 7.95% to 8.40% and $100,000 rollover @ 
9.4%; October 30, 1981, $3,000,000 @ 8.45 & 9.15; and December 30, 
1981, $1,200,000 rollover @ 6.89% & 6.94%. 

At its meeting on January 12, 1981, the Board confirmed the 
action of the Town Manager in establishing the Board of Health as 
the Hazardous Waste Administrative Authority for the Town of 
Andover and also his action in establishing a Study Committee 
Relative to the Construction of Towers and his appointments 
thereto. 

In light of the limitations on the town budget imposed by 
"Proposition 2 1/2." the Board of Selectmen continued its policy of 
extending the use of user fees for certain public programs. At its 
meeting on January 26, 1982, fees were established for the Division 
of Elder Services. 

The establishment of a mutually acceptable central maintenance 
organization to cover all public property, both town and school, 
was high on the Selectmen's agenda during the year, but very little 
progress was actually made toward that objective. 



More Conservation Land was accepted by the Selectmen during 
the year, including a strip adjacent tot he Merrimack River behind 
the Hewlett-Packard Corp., the gift of the 93 Building Trust. 

The Board encountered some difficulties in executing its 
function as a Licensing Board in dealing with cases involving the 
sale of liquor to minors. In one case in which a suspension of a 
license had been directed, the owner chose to ignore the dates by 
appealing to the State Alcoholic Beverage Control Board. It thus 
became necessary to postpone the action on the judgment of the 
Board for approximately two months. 

Action was taken during the year to pursue with the Boards of 
Selectmen of Tewksbury and Wilmington a solution to the matter of 
an additional interchange on Interstate Route 93 between that at 
Route 125 and that at Dascomb Road. As Wilmington would not agree 
to the State's proposal to move the Route 125 interchange 
northward, shutting off the existing ramps, the three towns finally 
reached agreement in the interests of relieving the increasing 
traffic congestion in the Lowell Junction/Ballardvale Street area 
to leave open the Route 125 half interchange and recommend the 
construction of a new interchange somewhat more than a mile to the 
north which would also serve the proposed Tewksbury Industrial 
Park. Support from more than fifteen industries to be affected was 
obtained in written form by the end of the year. 

At its meeting on February 23, 1982, the Board approved 
establishment of a CARD District in Shawsheen Village following a 
public hearing. 

Digital Equipment Corp. appeared before the Board at its 
meeting on March 16, 1981, with representatives of the Industrial 
Development Financing Authority to discuss the former's plans for a 
third project in Andover to be at Dascomb Road and Frontage Road. 
It would be necessary to rezone this land as industrial from its 
existing status as residential. The other problem would be the 
sewer, as the site is outside the Master Sewer Plan area. 
Consideration of this project was carried on throughout the year by 
all levels of the town government. 

The matter of the commuter rail service operated by the MBTA 
between Haverhill and Boston, subsidized by the state and the 
cities and towns, was a subject of occasional discussion during the 
year, particularly at budget-preparation time, as arguments against 
continuing the subsidy under the conditions of Proposition 2 1/2 
were put forward. At the end of the year, however, the service was 
still being provided. 

At its meeting on March 30, 1982, the Board approved the 
report of the Solid Waste Study Committee and authorized the Town 
Manager to sign a contract with UOP . This contract was based on the 
UOP facility receiving initially 900 tons of trash daily at its 
North Andover facility from all municipalities participating. 

Consideration was given by the Board on several occasions to 
proposals designed to save the buildings of the Shattuck Farm which 
were on land purchased by Digital Equipment Corp. A proposed zoning 
change could not be agreed to. At the end, the buildings were 
purchased by private sources and moved to their land. 

Also during the year, the Board gave preliminary approval to 
the issuance of Industrial Revenue Bonds for the development of new 
projects, as follows: Dundee Park Properties for the constructing 
and equipping of buildings, $900,000 on March 16, 1981; Physical 
Sciences, Inc., for the purchase of land and construction and 

5 



equipping of facilities, $1,400,000 (final approval) on March 16, 
1981; Andover Professional Trust, for the acquisition, construction 
and renovation of facilities, $1,400,000 on April 13, 1981; and 
Arthur Feinberg on behalf of Eastern Products Corp. for 
construction and restoration of buildings in Ballardvale, 
$1,700,000 on June 29, 1982, (last two preliminary approval). 

At its meeting on May 4, 1981, the Board considered the terms 
of a Provisional License to be issued to Rollins Cablevision of 
Massachusetts, Inc., as recommended by the firm of Malarkey-Taylor 
Associates of Washington, D. C, hired to arbitrate between the 
Rollins proposal and that of Continental Cablevision. The Board 
approved the terms, the provisional license to be replaced by a 
permanent license for a term of fifteen years on or before May 4, 
1982. 

Bids on the school building program were received 1 1/2 to 3 
million dollars over the $11,000,000 already appropriated by Town 
Meeting. Accordingly, at their meeting on May 18, 1982, the 
Selectmen approved the calling of a Special Town Meeting within the 
Annual Town Meeting on June 3, 1981, in order to see if the voters 
would approve an additional sum for school construction. However, 
at its meeting on May 20, 1981, that date for the Special Town 
Meeting was changed to June 8, 1981. The Board subsequently agreed 
to support appropriation of an additional $2,000,000, which was 
approved by the voters . 

The Annual Town Meeting was held at the Memorial Auditorium of 
the East Junior High School on May 26, June 1, June 2 and June 8, 
1981. Special Town Meetings within the Annual Town Meeting were 
held on each day. 

At the Special Meeting on June 1, 1981, Jared S. A. Clark, the 
Town Manager, notified the Board, in accordance with his contract 
that he would resign as of June 30, 1981. At their meeting on June 
22, 1982, the Selectmen appointed Anthony J. Torrisi, Director of 
Finance and Budget, as Acting Town Manager, effective June 30, 
1981. 

The Board devoted considerable time during the year to a bylaw 
concerning the conversion of rental apartments to condominiums at 
the urging of a group of elderly and retired people. Such a bylaw 
was voted by the Annual Town Meeting of 1981, but was ruled invalid 
by the Attorney General of the Commonwealth. The Board then 
directed the filing of an appeal against this ruling. In the end, 
the Board decided to withdraw the appeal and the permit fee of 1%. 

The Board also devoted much time after July 1, 1981, to the 
search for and selection of a new Town Manager. To assist the 
Board, arrangements were made with the New England Municipal Center 
of Durham, New Hampshire, to advertise the position and screen 
applications received down to a manageable number. Because of 
pressure from the media, the Board found itself under suit in its 
efforts to maintain the confidentiality of those applications filed 
by employed persons requesting that their names not be revealed. As 
a result, the search was temporarily blocked. However, one 
candidate was selected who rejected the Board's offer, and it 
became necessary to start over again. The Board was again harassed 
in its efforts by being subjected to a second suit, but finally was 
able to reach agreement with Mr. Kenneth R. Mahony, then City 
Manager of Passaic, New Jersey, who agreed to take over as Town 
Manager on or about January 1, 1982. 

At its meeting on August 13, 1981, the Board signed and 
executed a quit-claim deed to Dr. Sanford Kaufman for the Cardinal 
Cushing Gymnasium for $65,000, subject to certain terms and 
conditions . 

6 






On August 31, 1981, the Board confirmed the Acting Town 
Manager's appointment of Mr. Jonathan B. Gilmore as Director of 
Community Development and Planning, vice Mr. Rhys Kear, who had 
resigned effective June 30, 1981. 

The 100% plans for the Elm Square redesign were presented to 
the Board on September 14, 1981, and approved, the work to be done 
by the State. 

Considerable time in the fall was devoted by the Board to the 
traffic on North Main Street. One of the elderly residents of Frye 
Circle was killed attempting to cross the street even though 
traffic lights were operating. The need for a powerful overhead 
flood light was agreed. Changes were also made to improve the 
access to and egress from the Shawsheen Plaza shopping center. 

The Board also considered its option of adopting 
"classification" of real property following completion of the 100% 
revaluation undertaken earlier and nearing completion. This would 
tax different classes of real estate at differing rates. After much 
discussion and thought, the option was rejected by the Board. 

In the course of the year, the Board approved going ahead with 
sale of the Bradlee School (Town Meeting also having given its 
approval), and on November 2, 1981, plans developed by Mr. Francis 
P. Reilly for conversion of the building to multi-family residence 
units were accepted. The sale was finalized in December. 

Much attention was given by the Board during the year to 
petitions from residents asking for spraying of the gypsy moths 
which have been infesting the town. It even, on November 9, 1981, 
voted against a petition for a Special Town Meeting to raise funds 
for spraying. However, the petition was disapproved by the Finance 
Committee, as provided in the bylaws. 

On December 14, 1981, the issuance of the school building 
bonds was discussed by the Board with the Town's financial 
advisors. It was agreed to issue the bonds for ten years at a rate 
of interest as near 9 1/2% as possible. 

At its meeting on December 28, 1981, the non-acceptance of 
Whispering Pines Drive was discussed with legal representatives of 
the residents. It was decided to address a letter to the County 
Commissioners recommending acceptance of the street, a procedure 
provided for in the Massachusetts General Laws in cases in which 
the Town Meeting refuses to accept a street for insufficient 
reasons. This was done and the case closed by the Commissioners 
directing acceptance of the street. 



Town Manager and Finance & Budget 

The early months of 1981 focused heavily upon budget 
preparation and Town Meeting preparation. The passage of the tax 
limitation statute was of major concern during this period as 
municipal officials attempted to balance the various needs and 
desires of the public with the monies available to fund 
departmental operations . 

The fiscal year 1982 budget complied with these requirements 
through the careful planning of both past and current Town 
Officials and a thoughtful review of budget requests. Subsequent to 
Town Meeting, Governor King and the State Legislature agreed to an 
increase in local aid to offset our revenue loss. For Andover, this 



increased local aid helped to offset our approximately $600,000 
motor vehicle excise loss. Although the fiscal year 1982 tax rate 
had not been set as of the date of this report, as a result of 
careful budget review and increased state aid we expect the total 
tax levy from FY1981 to FY1982 to approach a 2% reduction. 

The town-wide property revaluation continued throughout 1981. 
In late August PRC Jacobs mailed notices of valuation changes to 
approximately 9,000 residential property owners and 1,000 
commercial and industrial properties. Taxpayers had an opportunity 
to visit with the company to discuss this valuation notice, and 
approximately 3,000 property owners took advantage. As 1981 came to 
a close, PRC Jacobs was in the process of completing the project. 
The final valuation of property in the Town (as of January 1, 1981, 
approaches one billion dollars. While Proposition 2 1/2 limits the 
tax levy to 2.5% of total value, Andover is substantially below 
this limit, with a tax levy of less than 2% of total value. 

The certification of this valuation, however, did not occur in 
time for the first-half tax billing. Since many communities were 
faced with a similar problem, the State Legislature passed a bill 
allowing communities to mail estimated tax bills. This bill was 
typically one-half of the taxpayer's FY1981 bill. 

The groundbreaking for the school building program occurred on 
June 26 and thereby began the $13,720,000 construction and 
rehabilitation project for the Town's junior and senior high school 
programs. Town Meeting authorized an additional two million dollars 
in early June. On June 19, a $478,786 contract was signed with 
Meola Construction Corporation for construction, improvemetns and 
alterations to playing fields at Doherty Junior High School, West 
Junior High School and Andover High School. On June 24, a 
$10,800,735 contract was signed with Peabody Construction Company, 
Inc., for alterations and additions to Andover High School, Doherty 
Junior High School and West Junior High School. Completion of the 
project is scheduled for the summer of 1983. 

The three-member Cable TV Advisory Committee completed its 
review of proposals for cable television and recommended to the 
Board of Selectmen the award of a provisional license to Rollins, 
Inc. Subsequent to a follow-up report from the consultant firm of 
Malarkey-Taylor and Associates of Washington, D. C, the Cable TV 
Advisory Committee re-affirmed its recommendation to the Board of 
Selectmen, and in May the Board of Selectmen voted to award the 
provisional license to Rollins, Inc. A newly organized five-member 
Andover Cable Advisory Committee was appointed to negotiate the 
execution of the provisional and final license and oversee the 
implementation of the fifteen-year cable television license. The 
provisional license was executed on November 2, 1981. Construction 
of the system is to be completed within ten months after signing of 
the final license. 

The sale of two Town-owned buildings and finalization of plans 
for their respective reuse was achieved during 1981. The Bradlee 
School in Ballardvale and the Cardinal Cushing Gym in Shawsheen are 
scheduled for private development as an 11-unit apartment building 
and medical/professional office building respectively. The support 
of the public and the neighborhoods for these two projects greatly 
contributed toward reversing a declining situation. 

The necessity for the reconstruction of the Riverina Road 
sewer pumping station continues. During the summer the town 
received the Step II grant from the Federal Government which will 
allow preparation of final design specifications and contract 
documents. Funding for Step III construction (estimate 8-10 
months) is currently being debated between Congress and the 

8 



President. We are hopeful that the program will receive its full 
appropriation . 

The Town Personnel Rules and Regulations, last updated in 
1965, were reviewed and revised as appropriate and promulgated in 
June, 1982. 

Because of possible insurance problems, the town's alternative 
youth sentencing program was temporarily suspended. Through the 
efforts of town officials and our insurance advisor, a non-profit 
corporation, Alternative Sentencing Program of Andover, Inc., was 
established to allow this successful program to continue. 

In recognition of the construction schedule at East Junior 
High School and the vacancy date of June, 1982, a committee was 
formed representing town and school officials, Planning Board, 
Finance Committee, business, neighborhood and original committee 
members to reopen the study of the reuse of the East wing and the 
Punchard wing. It is anticipated that a recommendation will be made 
in 1982 to Town Meeting. 

The year 1981 also saw the resignation of the Town Manager, 
Community Development and Planning Director, Water Superintendent, 
Environmental Affairs Coordinator and Assistant Civil Engineer. The 
Board of Selectmen appointed the Director of Finance and Budget as 
Acting Town Manager during its nation-wide search for a new Town 
Manager. This search was completed as 1981 drew to a close, and the 
new Town Manager was scheduled to take office in early 1982. During 
the summer of 1981 a new Community Development and Planning 
Director and Environmental Affairs Coordinator were recruited. In 
another organizational item, perhaps the largest group of brass 
promotion occurred in Police Department history: one new captain, 
three lieutenants and three sergeants. 

Citizen and committee involvement in Andover government 
continues strong. The back pages of the Annual Town Report identify 
those elected and appointed officials who volunteer their time and 
efforts to the Town. Their service is greatly appreciated. Unnamed, 
but just as much appreciated, are those individuals who have 
assisted these groups and/or departments over the past year. 



Town Counsel 



During the year 1981, twenty-two new cases were brought 
against the Town of Andover. Ten cases were successfully disposed 
of and one case was appealed to the Appeals Court after a finding 
for the Town. This leaves a balance of fifty-three cases pending 
litigation. Town Counsel made numerous appearnaces before State 
Courts and Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were 
researched and rendered to town officials on thirty-two occasions. 

Town Counsel rendered in excess of one hundred seventeen 
informal opinions and had conferences with the Town Manager, Acting 
Town Manager and with town officials on an almost daily basis. 

Town Counsel reviewed all Articles of the Warrant and attended 
all Town Meetings. 

During the period covered by this report, contracts were drawn 
and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, releases, agreements 
and betterment assessments were drafted, reviewed and recorded. 



Town Clerk 

At the conclusion of 1981, the total number of registered voters was 15,840, 
divided among the eight precincts as follows: 

1 - 1760 3 - 2045 5 - 2107 7 - 2074 

2 - 1865 4 - 1945 6 - 2151 8 - 1893 

The following Statistical and Financial Reports are for the period from 
January 1, 1981 to December 31, 1981: 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Number of Births recorded: 

Males: 95 Females: 118 213 

Number of Marriages recorded: 196 

Number of Deaths recorded: 182 

Males: 81 Females: 101 



Number of Dog Licenses sold 2034. Total amount collected was $8,525.00 all of which was submitte 

to the Town Treasurer. Of this amount, $2,906.70 was retained by the Town and the balance was 
sent to the County Treasurer. 

The number of Fishing and Hunting Licenses sold was 929. The total amount collected was $9,590.4' 
Of this amount $216.65 was retained by the Town Treasurer. The balance was sent to the Division 
of Fisheries and Game. 

Other Monies collected were as follows: 

Marriage Licenses: $ 1,116.00 

Certified Copies: 2,109.00 

U.C.C. 2,702.00 

Misc. Licenses: 1,422.00 

A. B.C. Licenses: 29,530.00 

Business Certificates 160.00 

Misc. (Storage of Inflammables, 

Street Lists, Maps, etc.) 3,815.50 

TOTAL $ 40,854.50 

Total monies collected were $58,969.90. Of this amount, $43,977.85 was turned over to the Town 
Teasurer, $9,373.75 went to the Division of Fisheries and Game, and $5,618.30 was sent to the 
County Treasurer for Dog Licenses. 

10 



■ 



v 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SHCOOL 
STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1981 



^sh in Bank 
'aine Webber Cash Fund 
iertificates of Deposit 
'idelity Cash Reserves 
Securities at Book Value 



Zash in Bank 

?aine Webber Cash Fund 

r idelity Cash Reserves 



Jan. 1, 1981 

$ 8,531.78 

4,120.11 

40,000.00 

15,000.00 

35,032.11 

$102,684.00 



$ 2,207.21 

4,251.42 

769.23 

$ 7,227.86 



Summary of Transactions 
Principal Fund 



Reserve Fund 

Dividends Received 
Interest Income 
Loss on Sale of 

Securities 
Brokerage Fees 
Transfer to Cash 

Acct. 



$ 1,196.50 
5,017.30 

(6,870.96) 
(656.26) 

(102.81) 

$(1,416.23) 



Certificate of 

Deposit 
Merrill Lynch 

Ready Assets 
Securities at 

Book Value 



Cash in Bank 
Merrill Lynch 
Ready Assets 



Dec. 31, 1981 

$ 30,000.00 

31,880.37 

40,803.63 
$102,684.00 

$ 2,236.36 

3,575.27 
$ 5,811.63 



Zash Balance 



$ 2,524.68 



Cash Account 

Interest Received 
Dividends Received 
Expenses for School 

Projects 
Miscell. Expenses 
Transfer from Re- 
serve 



$ 3,728.26 
2,077.50 

(2,595.49) 
(441.16) 

102.81 
$ 2,871.92 



Cash Balance 



$ 5,396 .60 



$ 112,436.5^ 



Total Principal, Reserve & Cash Accounts 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



$ 113 ,892.23 





Balance 








Balance 




Jan. 1, 1981 


Income 


Total 


Awards 


Dec. 31, 1981 


H.W. & M.P. Barnard 


$ 


1,806.02 


$ 147.62 


$ 1,953.64 


$ 


$ 


1,953.64 


J.W. Barnard - Cash 




188.64 


T. 87.42 


276.06 


- 




276.06 


- Securities 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 


- 




1,000.00 


Alice M. Bell 




1,086.61 


86.26 


1,172.87 


80.00 




1,092.87 


Edna G. Chap in 




2,534.20 


201.42 


2,735.62 


180.00 




2,555.62 


Fred W. Doyle 




10,509.28 


908.41 


11,417.69 


750.00 




10,667.69 


Warren F. Draper 




1,610.33 


128.13 


1,738.46 


110.00 




1,628.46 


William G. Goldsmith 




715.37 


40.99 


756.36 


- 




756.36 


Elizabeth T. Gutterson 




1,807.45 


86.33 


1,173.78 


80.00 




1,093.78 


Myron G. Gutterson 




442.11 


25.34 


467.45 


- 




467.45 


Andover Grange 




2,294.83 


185.92 


2,480.75 


100.00 




2,380.75 




$ 


23,274.84 


$ 1,897.84 


$25,172.68 


$ 1,300.00 


$ 


23,872.68 








Funds Held 











Andover Savings Bank - Savings Accounts 

- Certificates of Deposit 



$ 1,471.87 
10,705.12 



Merrill Lynch Ready Assets Acct. #06382204197 10,695.69 
70 Shares Union Pacific (Market Value - $3,640.00) 1,000.00 

$ 23,872.68 



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13 



Community Service 

The emphasis in the Department of Community Services in 1981 was on streamlim 
efficiency of current programming with a specific focus on significantly raising 
revenues. While operational efficiency has characterized the Department for years 
the necessity of increasing the amount of money raised so dramatically (from $85,0 
to $150,000) by the end of FY82 has created a great challenge to the ingenuity and 
resourcef ulnuess of the entire staff. The answers cannot simply be found in in- 
creased fees to the public; some programs are popular but simply cannot carry such 
high fees. Therefore, alternatives were sought including donations from stores, 
major companies, Arts and Humanities grants, etc. There are few governmental oper 
ations that have been brought as close to operating as a business as the Departmen 
of Community Services has done in the past year. 

The Department continued to offer a full and diversified complement of year- 
round programs. A total of more than 7,000 participants filled the classes and 
workshops of the fall, winter/spring and summer programs combined. Over 7,500 mor 
took part in special events, trips, leagues, tournaments, movies and concerts. In 
addition to these registered events, thousands more participated in open programs 
such as swimming at Pomps Pond, open gyms, ice skating, playground programs, tenni 
and others. 



i 
is 

K 



The winter/spring program which began in late February offered over 150 classi 
workshops, and special events. A change in registration at West Jr. from the cafe- ' 
teria to the auditorium proved successful despite a major power failure. New offe:' 
ings included a co-sponsorship with the Nutrition Network to which several hundred 
attended the workshop on Diet Nutrition and Your Child's Behavior. Traditional 
special programs included Bradford Ski (153), Sugarloaf trips (130), Men's Basketbi 
Leagues (210), Girls' Basketball League (75), Floor Hockey (200). The Annual Spri; 
Exhibit was set up in conjunction with the Andover Schools' Fine Arts Festival whit 

was most successful. 

I s 

While tests and interviews for the summer playgound program were underway, otl 
workshops and special events continued throughout the spring: It's An Animals Wor! 
(108), Faneiul Hall Trip (25), Elementary Gymnastics Meet (288), Volleyball Tourna-f 
ment (130), Kite Flying (62), Family Bike Hikes (100), Men's Softball League (300) ' 
Crafts in the Park was again held in conjunction with the American Field Services 



:: 



In April, Program Coordinator George Kwiecien left the Department. The posi- 
tion was filled in late May by David O'Neill. 

The summer playground program was held at six locations, including the replace 
ment of Doherty School which was under construction, with a new playground at 
Bancroft. This location included a Pre-School Program and was very popular at botlf 
levels. A second Pre-School Program was held at Sanborn. An All Day Playground w; 
offered for the first time at South School. The Special Needs Playground Program 
returned to Andover and was held at West Elementary with swimming again at Pomps Pa 

l li 

This year funds were solicited to support the Movies and Concerts in the Park's 
and at the Pond. These were attended by over 3,000 people throughout the summer. 
Nearly 1,200 attended various summer playground events and trips. Seventy-three 
classes and workshops were held (812) . A new program was Kaleidoscope, offering a 
unique one-week intensive experience in various skills. The following are some of 
the Summer Special Events: Tennis Tournaments (128) , Red Sox Trip (45) , Roller 
Skating (109) , Track Meets (300) , Hampton Beach Shuttle (1028) . Pomps Pond offeree 
swimming lessons (158) as well as canoe rentals (150) and other special activities. 
The annual reunion of Infant/Toddler parents doubled in attendance with over 100 
mothers and babies. 

Over 150 classes, workshops and special events were offered in the fall. 
Phillips Academy continued to offer its program in conjunction with the Department. 
A new registration feature was the elimination of the Sanborn School location whicl 
worked out exceedingly well. Special Events included the Bike Race (46) and Road 

14 



ze (150) which this year was sponsored largely by Pepsi Cola. The Haunted House, 
aanded to two evenings, was held in the Shawsheen School and drew an overwhelming 
285 people! Numerous workshops were held, also Nature Walks (150) . Crotched 
iuntain Ski Trip was a new event in mid-December (40) as was the SPARC Christmas 
rty (26) . 

Art in the Park was again held in the fall in conjunction with the Andover 
tists Guild. 

Maintenance functions centered primarily around the Special Article projects at 
creation Park. These included building a garage, removing footings and laying an 
phalt covering for the shelter floor, installing bathrooms and reparations to the 
isting shed. Though much of the work was contracted out, the Department's mainte- 
nce man was responsible for a major portion of the construction. 

Tennis courts were examined and research began regarding types and costs of 
furbishing the High School complex. 

General maintenance projects included upkeep of Recreation Park, Pomps Pond and 
:nnis Courts, set up and breakdown for Arts & Crafts in the Park, Community Bulle- 
.n Board, skating rinks, involvement with all major special events, playground set- 
> and breakdown, overseeing youth workers. 

The Department moved in August from the Doherty to Shawsheen School, where it 
5 once again with school administration as well as other school personnel. The 
rangement is convenient, though quarters are very cramped and the location within 
»wn is not convenient to the community or Department needs. 

The Director and both Program Coordinators continue to be involved in committees 
id associations such as Alcohol Safety Action Program, Adult Education Committee 
or Special Needs), Health Education Advisory Committee, Massachusetts Recreation 
id Parks Association and several others in addition to traditional roles on the 
jmmunity Services Committee and the Council on Aging. 

Contracts with the Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center and the Greater 
iwrence Psychological Center changed beginning in July as a result of Request for 
oposals by the Community Services Committee. The Director and Committee spent the 
irly part of the year developing detailed goals for service by these agencies. A 
iriety of classes and workshops were offered by both Centers in the Fall Program. 

The Community Services Committee was also actively involved in the preparation 
the Special Article for redevelopment of Recreation Park presented at the Spring 
>wn Meeting. The Article passed, leading to major Department involvement in pro- 
cts at the Park throughout the summer and fall, described previously under main- 
tenance. 

While the overall attendance in Department of Community Services programs con- 
Lnues to increase, it is evident that measures taken to increase revenue have taken 
ieir toll. On the other hand, the resourcefulness of the Department staff has 
;sulted in minimizing fee increases to the greatest extent possible. The Department 
jntinues to strive to maintain not only the financial support but the general sup- 
3rt of the community — its good will and eager participation in all Department 
rograms. 

)UNCIL ON AGING 



The Council on Aging was established in accordance with Chapter 495 of the 
issachusetts General Laws of 1956, Section 8B of Chapter 40. The five core respon- 
Lbilities of the Council on Aging are: 

To promote individual input in seeking support for elder services through 
legislation, grant proposals and activity in policy making. 



15 



2. To identify the needs of the community's elderly population and available 
resources to meet such needs. 



3. To educate the community at large to the needs of the elderly. 

4. To design, promote and implement needed services and to coordinate with 
existing services for the elderly. 

5. To be the local catalyst for the Area Agency on Aging network of services. 

The Council on Aging meets this charge through the implementation of programs 
and services responsive to the community's needs. The areas encompassed include 
preventive health, information and referral, transportation, homemaker and chore 
services, education, recreation, nutrition, meals on wheels, counseling, Friendly 
Visitors Program, housing assistance, telephone reassurance and advocacy. 

The Council on Aging is responsible for the operation of the Andover Senior 
Center. The Senior Center is located on the first floor of the Old Theatre Buildir 
at 11 Essex Street. The Center is open from Monday through Friday (except holidays 
from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Transportation is available to Andover residents age sixty and older or handi- 
capped. The Andover WEEBUS operates Monday through Friday from 8:45 a.m. to 4:45 p 
Transportation is available for medical, nutrition, shopping, employment and social 
trips. The cost for this service is 25C each way within Andover and $1.00 each way 
to Lawrence, North Andover or Methuen. Reservations for this service may be made k 
calling 475-4310 twenty-four hours in advance of the requested trip. 



:, 



The Senior Citizens lunch program is now located in the Shawsheen School. Nut| e , 
tious lunches are served for all residents age sixty and older. Lunches are served 
at 12 noon Monday through Friday (if there is no school, there is no lunch). Reseidt 
vations for lunch must be made by calling 470-0870 before 10:00 a.m. on the day of 
the lunch. 



Meals-on-Wheels are available to homebound Senior Citizens Monday through Fric 
at a cost of $1.00. 

Services provided to Andover residents age sixty and older in 1981 were: 



Hi 



Information and Referral 

Home Care Services 

Elderly Health Programs 

Protective Services 

Legal Services 

Day Trips 

Congregate Meals 

Home Delivered Meals 

Transportation 

Education 

Recreation 

Exercise /Dance 

Arts and Crafts 

Parties and Celebrations 

Income Tax Assistance 

Mass. Deaf Senior Citizens 

Total 

Newsletters Distributed 



16,056 

90 

1,591 

24 

24 

675 

13,437 

6,442 

14,295 

936 

4,281 

4,587 

1,439 

1,292 

174 

49 

65,392 

18,000 



(clients) 



16 



li 



;i 



Funding for elderly programs in Fiscal Year 1981 came from the following 
ources: 

Town of Andover $ 57,502 
Elder Services of Merrimack Valley 

Home Care Services 78,948 

Senior Aides 12,258 

Elderly Health Programs 9,357 

Protective Services 607 

Legal Services 802 

Elder Exercise 100 

Deaf Senior Citizens 166 

Nutrition 1,855 

Family Services 152 
Department of Elder Affairs 

Council on Aging Grant 1, 732 

Total $ 161,747 

The Council on Aging continues to see increased participation in all programs 
nd services. Increased fees to clients have not inhibited participation. Atten- 
ance at all Council on Aging activities continues to grow. Adequate space for the 
enior Center continues to be the number one priority. 

The dedication of over 130 volunteers allows the program to continue to expand. 
REATER LAWRENCE MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 



The Greater Lawrence Mental Health Center has recently completed its second 
ear as a federally designated Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center. It is 
ow just a litte over one year since the opening of a satellite clinic in Andover, 
t Four Park Street, which serves residents of both Andover and North Andover. 

The Center provides a range of mental health services to residents which in- 
lude: emergency evaluations for individuals in crisis situations; evaluation for 
he need of hospitalization; counselling and psychotherapy to individuals, couples, 
amilies and groups; psychological and psychiatric evaluations; medication clinic 
or patients referred for psychotrophic medication; specialized services for chil- 
ren, adolescents, and the elderly; follow-up services for individuals requiring 
ong-term care; professional consultation to schools and other public agencies; 
ducational presentations, seminars, and workshops. 

During the last fiscal year, a total of one hundred and forty Andover residents 
.ave been seen for initial evaluation in order to determine their appropriateness 
or a variety of therapeutic modalities. Where appropriate, specialized referrals 
.o rehabilitation services and outreach services for families lacking transportation 
ind geriatric services have been provided. A total of thirteen hundred and fifty 
.irect hours of service have been provided during the period from January 1, to 
lecember 31, 1981. 

Our Emergency Service Team has provided two hundred hours of service, both at 
he Center and in the community, to persons who were experiencing some form of acute 
motional distress. The Elderly Service Team has rendered more than one hundred 
lours of service to Andover senior citizens. Additionally, a good liaison has been 
stablished between the Andover Friendly Visitor Program and the Center's Friendly 
Visitor Program, which serves the remaining Greater Lawrence communities. 

The Consultation and Education Service has scheduled several community educa- 
.ion events in cooperation with the Community Service Department. 

The task of establishing a satellite clinic, making its presence known within 
;he community, and developing appropriate channels of communication with community 

17 



agencies, while meeting stringent federal I and local standards for licensure, has 
just begun. In a period of federal and spate retrenchment of support in the area 
of social services, this bold new step presents an exciting challenge to the Cente 
and the community. 



GREATER LAWRENCE PSYCHOLOGICAL CENTER 

The following report describes the wide range of services provided by the 
Greater Lawrence Psychological Center to the Town of Andover during 1981. 

Consultation and Education: 



Several staff members provided consultation in the schools on issues related 
to substance abuse. Karen Allen, A.C.S.W., Phillis Yardley, A.C.S.W., and Hillaryj 
Turkewitz, Ph.D., met with school administrators to discuss agency services, the 
school system's policy on drug and alcohol related offenses, and the implementatio 
of a family evaluation procedure for High School students involved in drug abuse. 
Dr. Turkewitz, Ms. Allen, and Jon Firger, M.S.W., have conducted such family evalu 
ations and worked with Wendy Palmer, Adjustment Counsellor, to develop recommenda- 
tions as to conditions of probation. 



I 



Ms. Allen has provided educational programs on substance abuse in a variety o 
settings throughout the year. She provided drug abuse workshops in Andover to 
foster parents, to the peer counsellors in the High Schools, to Special Needs per- 
sonnel, and to elementary school teachers. In addition, she met with all of the 
Health Education classes in the High School and presented information on drugs, 
their effects, and the treatment of substance abuse. Thus, Ms. Allen has worked 
with students, student counsellors, parents, adjustment counsellors, and teachers, 
all in an effort toward the prevention and treatment of substance abuse. 

Consultation has also been provided on mental health issues not related to 
substance abuse. Jeffrey Bodmer-Turner , Ed.M., presented to Health Services per- 
sonnel on Child Abuse and Neglect. Alan Seiber, Ph.D., participated in a panel 
discussion at a P.T.O. meeting on stress in elementary school children. Dr. Turke 
witz presented to the High School peer counsellors on crisis intervention. In ad- 
dition, she will be providing an inservice training series on short term therapy 
for Adjustment Counsellors. 

Clinical case consultations have been conducted regularly throughout the year 
for clients in therapy at the agency. In some cases this consultation involved 
participation in CORE meetings. Additional consultations involved Officer Hasting 



Clinical Supervision : 

Ms. Yardley provided clinical supervision to the Guidance Counsellors and 
School Psychologist at East Junior High, as well as to the Collaborative (now 
Currier Center). Dr. Turkewitz is supervising a doctoral level psychology student 
who is an Adjustment Counsellor Intern in the Andover School System. 

Workshops : 

Through the Department of Community Services, the Agency has provided two 
three session workshops to Andover residents. Gary Goldman, Ed.M., and Dr. 
Turkewitz led a workshop on Stress and Coping. Dr. Turkewitz conducted a Single 
Parent Workshop. Several staff members prepared to offer workshops on substance 
abuse and a variety of measures were taken to publicize these workshops. However, 
there was not sufficient enrollment to conduct these programs in the fall of 1981. 
They will be offered again in the spring. 

Information and Referral : 

In addition to educational programs offered in the schools, agency personnel 
have provided information on substance abuse throughout the year, primarily in the 
form of extended telephone contacts with parents who are concerned about their 

18 






Jliildren. When deemed appropriate, it is recommended that the parents bring their 
nild to the agency, for a comprehensive evaluation of general functioning and the 
Vresence or risk of substance abuse. Occasionally, children themselves contacted 
Tiency personnel for information, either for school projects of personal difficulties. 

I .rect Clinical Service : 

Andover residents are seen at the agency in individual family and group therapy, 
lien necessary, clinicians have conducted home visits to Andover residents. In 
lldition, agency staff are committed to providing effective crisi intervention, and 
ive scheduled same-day appointments for clients in crisis. 

In brief, the Greater Lawrence Psychological Center has been quite actively 
roviding services to the Town of Andover. The major programs have involved school 
^nsultations and clinical supervision, the development and provision of psycho- 
"■liucational workshops for residents, and direct clinical service. 



Fire Department 



The Fire Department was established and is maintained by the municipality to 
rovide protection to the public against injury, loss of life or property by fire, 
xplosion or other causes. Because of the importance and the hazardous nature of 
nis work, the fire fighter engaged in it must possess stamina and courage of the 
ighest order. In addition, however, he must possess certain specific knowledge 
Dncerning his work if he is to perform his duties effeciently and with minimum 
isk to himself and to his fellow fire fighters. He should have detailed knowledge 
f the dangers arising from heat, smoke and explosion caused by fire; of the hazards 
resented by new industries, processes, and materials developed by science; of the 
onstruction of buildings and the hazards involved in the materials used or stored 
n them, and of the dangers inherent in the use of water at high pressures. 

The objectives of fire protection are to prevent fires from starting, to pre- 
ent loss of life and property in case of fire, to confine fire to the place of 
rigin and to extinguish it. 

From the point of view of Town Government, this involves the services of fire 
revention and fire fighting. Fire fighting, because it requires positive and dra- 
atic action, has far greater appeal to people and fire fighters than fire preven- 
ion measures which involve restrictions, prohibitions and administrative "inter- 
erence" with what are termed individual rights. 

The Fire Department installs, repairs and maintains a coded fire alarm system 
omprising of approximately three million feet of wiring, both aerial and under- 
round, and associated street boxes and station equipment for controlling the system 
he Department operates from three stations - the Public Safety Center and the 
allardvale and West Andover Substations. The Department's fifty-seven men utilize 
even pieces of fire fighting apparatus. 

At the present time, twelve members of the Andover Fire Department are nation- 
lly registered Emergency Medical Technicians. All members of the Department have 
een trained in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation by two of our own members who are CPR 
nstructors. All of the requirements of the new State Laws under the Department of 
ublic Health have been met and the ambulance received a Massachusetts license in 
981-82. In addition, all members of the Department were trained to meet the State 
aw's requirements of the so-called First Responders Law and during the month of 
une all received refresher courses in CPR and were certified as of July 1, 1981. 

All emergency and business calls pertaining to both Fire and Police Departments 
re received in the Central Communications Center which is under the control of the 
ire Department. Currently, there are eight dispatchers answering phones, transfer- 
ing calls, and dispatching fire, ambulance and police officers to scenes of emer- 
encies as well as communicating with both protective agencies on radio. When the 
ew computer terminal becomes available a wealth of additional information vital to 
he operation of both Police and Fire Departments will be accessible to this Central 

19 



Communications Center. The response time, information on hand, and incidental in- 
formation will be immediately available to both Police and Fire Departments. 

Quarterly inspections of nursing homes, hospitals and inns, as required by 
State statutes, were conducted and the necessary reports filed with the proper 
authorities. Public and private school fire drills and inspections required by la^ 
were conducted. Mercantile, industrial, church, garage and service stations were 
inspected and reports filed. Findings and recommendations were sent to the owner/ 
occupants of dwelling houses of three or more apartments. In-service inspections 
were conducted from all three stations using radio-controlled fire trucks and full 
complement of fire fighters. Permits for oil storage, flammable liquid storage anc 
all such associated equipment were issued. Blasting permits, model rocketry permi- 
and fire alarm permits were also issued in accordance with State Laws. 

The Fire Prevention Program was conducted during the month of October. Once 
again this year, the Fire Department conducted an open house at the Central Statio; 
The response of the residents of Andover was overwhelming and made the endeavor 
highly successful. 

The major causes of fires during 1981 were associated with wood burning stove. 
The misuse of smoking materials, carelessness, children with matches and faulty 
electrical appliances and wiring all contributed to fires in the Town. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT ACTIVITIES 



: 



; 



1981 
(12-Month Period) 

Service Calls 2,576 

Fires 960 

Fire Alarms, Includes 

Accidental Alarms 201 

Mutual Aid Calls 36 

Approx. Value of Bldgs. 
Where Fire Occured $7,090,150 

Approx. Loss from Fire $317,815 

Ambulance Calls 1,107 

Medical Assistance Calls 70 

Ambulance-Mutual Aid to 

Other Towns 49 

Ambulance-Mutual Aid to 

Andover 70 

Non-Residents Billed for 

Ambulance Service 312 

Fuel Oil Heat Installation 140 

Rocketry Permits 12 

Explosive Use Permits 5 

Building Inspections 486 

Fire Drills Conducted 68 

Fatalities from Fire 

Flamm. Liq. Storage Permits 8 

Cutting/Welding Permits 3 

Fireworks Permits 1 

Fire Alarm Permits 99 



1980 
(12-Month Period) 

2,490 
909 

196 
22 

$9,751,626 

$131,347 

1,102 

45 

16 

32 

321 

215 

5 

16 

526 

84 


16 

4 

2 
38 



1979 
(12-Month Period) 

2,028 
924 

71 
19 

$232,805 

$110,242 

1,037 



33 

41 

308 

110 

6 

10 

482 

82 

1 

14 

5 

2 

141 



'. 



■ 



20 



Police Department 



The year 1981 saw some changes on the Andover Police Department by the retire- 
ment of Lt. Raymond Collins (32 years) , Sgt. Jacob Jacobson (26 years) , Officer 

e jobert Fanning (23 years), and the resignation of Officer John Murray. 
,i 

New patrolmen were appointed throughout the year to fill vacancies, but promo- 
i ions did not take place until October 18 due to the slowness of the Civil Service 
■ rocess. Lt. Lloyd Belbin was appointed Captain. Sgts. Richard Enos, Robert Parker, 
nd J. Kevin Lynch were appointed lieutenants. Officers Donald Mooers, John 
oulihan, and Steven Avery were appointed sergeants. John Pathiakis, Brian Pattullo, 
illiam Canane, Robert Cronin, Stephen Martellini, and Dennis Lane were appointed 
atrolmen. 

The Police Department received a motorcycle from the Governor's Highway Safety 
ureau from a grant for Traffic Enforcement. 

Although one more elementary school was closed in 1981, due to budget cuts in 
chool busing, which increased the number of children walking, we were able to uti- 
ize all of our crossing guards effectively. 

The Police Department received two new emergency generators from the State 
ivil Defense Agency. 

We also received a used school bus which has been converted into a Crime Pre- 
ention van. This vehicle will be used to further educate the public and keep them 
nformed on what part they can play in crime prevention and supporting the Police 
epartment. The bus will be set up with different displays on crime prevention, 
rug abuse, vandalism, etc. , and will hopefully allow the Department to reach a 
arger segment of the population at one time. 

The computer system which was installed in 1980 was finally programmed in 1981 
o retrieve information. The information stored in the computer aids the officers 
n their investigations and the supervisors in their supervisory capacity of direc- 
ing patrol activities. The Uniform Crime Report done monthly is no longer the 
lonumental manual task it has been in the past due to the use of the reports that 
ire run off the computer. 

For the year 1981 miscellaneous complaints dropped about 1,000 off the preced- 
ng year. This is not a good sign for it means people are not being attentive and 
ire possibly developing an attitude of not getting involved, when they should be 
•eporting suspicious activities. 



The following chart shows a comparison of police activities over the past four 



ears, 



1978 



1979 



1980 



1981 



Complaints 


5 


,040 


5 


,620 


5,982 


4,925 


I & E 




257 




327 


218 


305 


jarceny 




473 




533 


250 


590 


Stolen Cars 




99 




129 


78 


116 


Stolen Bikes 




187 




160 


102 


195 


1/V Accidents 




954 




916 


1,149 


1,351 


4/V Fatalities 




9 




1 


3 


6 


/andalism 




734 




972 


636 


535 


Mileage 


355 


,148 


390 


,102 


355,577 


341,297 


Gasoline 


39 


,603 


42 


,211 


38,326 


36,944 



21 



Animal Control 

The year 1981 saw the first signs of the impact of the controversial 2\ budget 
bill. The Department was cut one man and then the Department of Animal Control was 
reorganized with the sign maintenance department where the dog officer assists the 
maintenance man in many functions. 

The officer also supervises the Pro Bono program subjects assigned by the coun 
to do work for the good of the public at public buildings and land. 

The figures below do not give a true picture of 1981 due to the fact that we 
were without a dog officer for two months during the year. 



I 



1980 1981 



Lost Dogs 
Dogs Found 
Dog Complaints 
Dogs Sold 
Administration Fees 

Fees from Dogs Sold 
Money Turned in to Town Treasurer 
Owners Contacted for Unlicensed Dogs 
Cats Turned in to Pound 
Various Dead Animals Picked Up 
Impounded Dogs 
Number of Summonses Issued 
Amount of Fines 



60 


32 


16 


11 


2,179 


1,430 


36 


52 


$2,603 


$3,339 


$ 102 


$ 156 


$2,705 


$4,789 


862 


995 


80 


83 


91 


228 


214 


283 


116 


36 


$2,240 


$ 680 



Civil Defense 



a 



Andover Civil Defense acts as a liaison between the State Civil Defense Agency ; 
and the local government. Andover Civil Defense coordinates the activities of Town 
Departments with the State's suggested plans and guidelines, the most recent being 
the "Crisis Relocation Plan" which in case of attack residents would be asked to 
relocate to Rochester, New Hampshire. 



u 



Through the assistance of State Civil Defense, the Police Department was ablet 
obtain, at no cost to the Town, a 15,000 kilowatt generator on a trailor. This gene j; 
rator will supply emergency power to any Town Department during any type of power 
outage or special emergency circumstances requiring electricity thus increasing oui 
capability to function during an emergency. 

)1 
The Auxiliary Police have training meetings twice a month, along with one weekl 
traffic assignment. All members of the' Auxiliary unit have completed a 17 week 
course, one night a week, given by the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Training 
Council. All members of this unit have been trained in CPR. 

The Communication Section maintained their weekly meetings throughout the year, 
Both of these groups have been very beneficial to our Department and the Town this 
past year. 

1981 also saw the beginning of a three-year program to rebuild and increase 
communication efficiency obtained with matching federal funds was a new two meter 
base station. Also, the Town has made a slight increase in the communications bud- 
get to make this three-year plan possible. 

22 



AVIS 



The Andover Village Improvement Society reports the acquisition of four parcels 
c land during 1981. The first was a purchase of nearly an acre on Oriole Drive 
lich provides easier access and better parking facilities for Baker's Meadow Res- 
Ivation. Later in the year a parcel of four acres was purchased which enlarges the 
f'Cky Hill Reservation. Additional trails have been made through the area. In 
Ivember A.V.I.S. received a generous gift of twenty-three acres which borders Fos- 
Irs Pond. It is located on the Wilmington border and off Rattlesnake Hill Road and 
•iburn Street. It includes a high ridge with scenic views over the pond and other 
•■.tractive features. In December a gift of ten acres off Holt and Stinson Roads was 
Jhceived. Trails will be cut in the spring. 

The 11th annual canoe races were held on May 2nd in which thirty-three canoes 
id kayaks participated. Many walks and cross country ski outings were held on the 
sservations throught the year with the co-sponsorship of the Appalachian Mountain 
.ub. These have become biweekly and are very well attended. 



Memorial Hall Library 



Preparation for the future was the hallmark of 1981 at Memorial Hall Library. 
Lth the support of town individuals, town bodies and Town Meeting and implemented 
I an enthusiastic and able staff, the library forged ahead into the computer age. 

The CL System PDP 11/34 computer was installed at the end of the summer and 
tual inputting of library records began in October. The first year will be devot- 
3 entirely to getting as high a percentage of the holdings (over 140,000 titles) 
ito the file as possible. The target for on-line patron circulation is September, 
982. This system of automated circulation should facilitate service for users and 
treamline material control and record keeping processes. 

In February the library, through a grant, was the recipient of an ADM-31 termi- 
al which tied the library into the Boston Public Library. Catalogue cards are or- 
2red through this system; records of these become part of the Boston data base and 
n the future, searching will be done through this service. 

Although computerization has been the focal point, the library staff has main- 
ained ongoing services without interruption. 

The Ballardvale Branch was reopened in February in its new rented quarters with 
ceat fanfare. Although the quarters and collection are much smaller, circulation 
as higher than ever before. The Ballardvale Improvement Society, Trustees and 
riends provided a sign, carpeting and other amenities for the refurbished library. 

Programs were well received. The Gypsy Moth Control forum and the storyteller/ 
Dlksinger were standing-room-only affairs. Other ongoing programs included the 
iult film series, the various children's film series, United Nations Day celebra- 
ion, story hours, classroom visits plus many more. 

Circulation statistics show an increase in Ballardvale and in Children's Ser- 
ices. The first half of the year saw decreases monthly in adult circulation, but 
he last half showed considerable gain. The library appears to be used as heavily 
r even more so than in prior years so the only conclusion seems to be that people 
ay have been checking out fewer books. 

Memorial Hall Library reissues of the Memorial Hall Library brochure, the Day 
are guide and the monthly art brochure were distributed. Dollars and Sense; a 
uide to Factory Outlets was published as well as other handouts, such as book lists, 



useum pass information and more. 

23 



The library was represented at area functions, worked with the schools on prc| 
jects and coordinated a carpool-to-Boston operation. 

Carolyn Reynolds retired after two years as Friends' president and Priscilla 
Seewald took over. The Friends have been active in library support efforts: the 
Book Sale, sponsoring five different museum passes, financing library publications 
providing volunteers and providing programs. 

Cornelia LeMaitre stepped down as Chairman of the Trustees after two years' se 1 ' 
vice and Robert G. Butler took on the responsibility. Staff changes included the rj 
tirement of Julia A. Wilde of the Technical Services Department. Helen Sellers, a^ 
ready on the staff, replaced her. Asst. Librarian in the Children's Room, Kathleei 
Busch, left for greener pastures in Connecticut and Jennifer Strom took her place. 

Energy conservation measures were undertaken after a most thorough energy aud: 
Installation of storm windows, other improvements like weather stripping and caulkii 
etc. , took place this year with plans for further tightening up of the building in 
1982. 

As usual, the last comment must call attention to the dire need for more inte- 
rior space and parking. 



: 



: 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



Adult 



Juvenile 



Total 



1981 



1980 



1981 



1980 



1981 



1980 



REGISTRATION 
OF BORROWERS 


2,813 


2,811 


666 


640 


3,479 


3,451 


BOOK STOCK & USE 
Vols, at end of 
reporting year 


124,314 


121,611 


32,803 


32,959 


157,117 


154,570 


Pbs. at end of 
reporting year 


8,225 


8,126 


1,930 


1,789 


10,155 


9,915 


Vols, added 


4,989 


5,638 


1,331 


1,359 


6,320 


6,997 


Pbs. added 


1,159 


1,400 


294 


386 


1,453 


1,786 


Vols, withdrawn 


2,286 


1,931 


1,487 


1,257 


3,773 


3,188 


Pbs. withdrawn 


202 


304 


207 


247 


409 


614 


Vols, circulated 
(including periodi- 
cals & pamphlets) 


265,960 


271,961 


114,402 


110,764 


380,362 


382,725 


INTERLIBRARY LOAN 














Books borrowed 


656 


484 










Books loaned 


8,765 


8,797 










AUDIOVISUAL 


Records 
1981 1980 




Other AV 
1981 1980 




Added 


476 


566 










Withdrawn 


190 


176 










Owned at end of yr. 


6,219 


6,652 










Circulated 


18,332 


22,649 




8,911 


8,755 




GRAND TOTAL CIRC. 


412,868 


413,420 











PERIODICALS & 
NEWSPAPERS 
Subscriptions 



406 



465 



PER CAPITA (based on est. town population of 26,050) 
Book Stock 6.03 5.93 

Circulation 15.85 15.86 

24 



Margaret G. Towle Fund 



Under the terms of her will, the late Mrs. Margaret G. Towle, long-term resident 
Andover, bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover , to be held 

d administered by it as a permanent trust fund. This is now known as the Margaret 
Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle stipulated in her will that the income from this fund 

e devoted to the assistance or the procurement of assistance for worthy persons 

siding in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, comfort or support on 

count of old age, disability or unemployment". 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Mana- 
- r with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from 
e Fund in accordance with the terms of Mrs. Towle' s will. The cases are referred 

the Trustees by private charitable groups and organizations, the Clergy and inter- 
ted individuals. 

During the twelve month period, the Trustees acted on twenty-five cases, dis- 
rsing $36,956.23 on approved cases (which numbered seventeen) and small administra- 
on expenses. Only the income of the Fund is available. The principal of 
45,825.50 and a substantial portion of the current income is invested under the 
rection of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town Treasurer upon 
uchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of December 31, 1980 $ 99,494.41 

Receipts - 1981 34,924.82 

$134,419.23 
Disbursements - 1981 36,956.23 

Balance of Income - December 31, 1981 $ 97,463.00 

Community Development and Planning 



Development activity decreased somewhat this past year. During the calendar 
:ar the Department revenues were $285,145. 

Several resignations were regretfully received this past year. Rhys G. Kear, 
rector, resigned in June and was replaced in September by Jonathan B. Gilmore. 
liter Eriksen, Environmental Affairs Coordinator, resigned in August and was re- 
.aced in September by James Greer. Michael Buss was hired in April as the Local 
lilding Inspector and Robert Vogt was hired as the full-time Plumbing and Gas In- 
jector in August. 

Changes to the Planning Board's Rules and Regulations Governing the Subdivision 
Land are nearing the final stages for public hearing and adoption and will be 
>mpleted early in the new year. 

JILDING INSPECTION: 



The Building Inspection Division of the Department of Community Development and 
Lanning is charged with the enforcement of the Massachusetts State Building Code and 
le local Zoning Bylaw, to do inspection and issuance of building permits and to en- 
ire public safety and we have, in so far as they are affected by building construc- 
Lon, through structural strength, adequate egress facilities, light and ventilation 



25 



and fire safety in general, to secure safety to life and property. 

Application for zoning variance and special permit is received and processed 
through the Building Division. This requires much time as records must be kept fo|; 
office and public record. 

Local Zoning Bylaw is to promote the health, safety, convenience, moral or wel 
fare of the inhabitants of the Town of Andover. To secure safety from fire, flood 
panic and other dangers, to prevent overcrowding of land, to avoid undue concentra 
tion of population, to encourage housing for persons of all income levels, to con- 
serve the value of land and building, to encourage the most appropriate use of Ian 
throughout the Town. 



The enforcement of the Zoning Bylaw is done by the Building Division as requir 
by law, and numerous zoning violations have been investigated and corrected withou 
incident. 

Inspection requires engineering judgements and social skill to convince public 
that code enforcement is not arbitrary and to increase likelihood of voluntary comj 
pliance . 

The purpose and intent of the Massachusetts State Building Code is for the pro 
tection of the owners, adjacent property owner, occupants and fire fighters, to pr 
vide for the health, safety and public welfare through structural strength and 
stability, adequate egress, proper lighting and ventilation, and protection of lif 
and property from fire and other hazards during construction. Also, to control th 
construction, reconstruction, alterations, repair and demolition. 

Following is a tabulation of the Building Permits issued for the years 1977 
through 1981. 

EST. VALUE FEES 

1977 
199 Dwellings & Garages $ 8,655,800 

52 Other Buildings 619,751 

496 Additions & Alterations 5,713,996 

122 Other (raze, sign, swim, pools, etc.) 201, 117 

869 $19,190,664 $44,410.00 

70 Certificates of Inspection 2,401.00 

1 Soil Removal 150.00 

$46,961.00 

1978 

161 Dwellings & Garages $ 7,259,000 

47 Other Buildings 8,062,394 

460 Additions & Alterations 3,787,839 

164 Other (raze, sign, swim, pools, etc.) 212, 769 

832 $19,322,002 $91,091.00 

61 Certificates of Inspection 1,956.25 

1 Soil Removal 15.00 

$93,062.25 

1979 

121 Dwellings & Garages $ 4,421,000 

16 Other Buildings 10,899,233 

554 Additions & Alterations 7,967,647 

293 Other (raze, sign, swim, pools, etc.) 525, 381 

984 $23,813,261 $112,163.00 

91 Certificates of Inspection 2,038.00 

Soil Removal 

$114,191.00 



l 



: 



I 



I 



26 



EST. VALUE FEES 

30 

05 Dwellings & Garages $ 7,840,100 
37 Other Buildings 20,399,796 
41 Additions & Alterations 4,443,693 

90 Other (raze, sign, swim, pools, etc.) 260,763 

73 $32,944,352 $146,827.00 

91 Chimney 455.00 

06 Certificate of Occupancy 5,300.00 
16 Certificates of Inspection 553.00 

4 Soil Removal 2,800.00 

$155,935.00 

81 

85 Dwellings & Garages $ 4,958,400 

11 Other Buildings 9,404,043 

54 Additions & Alterations 26,918,053 

19 Other (raze, sign, swim, pools, etc.) 638 ,779 

69 $41,919,275 $192,001.00 

67 Chimney 335.00 

19 Certificate of Occupancy 6,050.00 

65 Certificates of Inspection 3,640.00 

5 Soil Removal 2,900.00 

$204,926.00 

LECTRICAL INSPECTION: 



The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the practical safeguarding 
f persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. 

Enforcement of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is the responsibility of the 
ffice of the Electrical Inspector in the Building Inspection Division of the 
epartment of Community Development and Planning. The Inspector also is responsible 
or enforcing fire alarm regulations for new homes; receiving and granting permits 
nd scheduling inspections on a daily basis; inspecting all buildings for certifi- 
ate of occupancy; assisting the Fire Department in inspection of fires due to 
aulty electrical devices or equipment and seeing that permits are issued for re- 
airs due to fire damage; and attending school and classes on revisions to the 
lectrical code and power distribution systems to keep up with standards. 

Numerous electrical violations were investigated with the cooperation of Mas- 
achusetts Electric Company, and corrected without incident. 

Because the number of inspections per permit has increased, particularly in the 
ndustrial and commercial areas, the Division has completely revised and increased 
he permit fees dealing with those areas. It is the intent of the Electrical In- 
pector to assure the citizens and businesses of Andover of safe electrical instal- 
ation and operation. 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTIONS 

TYPE FEES COLLECTED 

977 



181 New Dwellings $ 3,305.00 

190 Alterations & Additions 2,073.75 

Commercial & Industrial 

301 Others (Services, boilers, etc.) 3,086. 50 

$ 8,465.25 

978 

160 New Dwellings $ 4,411.00 

164 Alterations & Additions 4,602.35 

2 Commercial & Industrial 72 5 -£2 

313 Others (Services, Boilers, etc.) 3,601.00 

639 $13,349.85 

27 



ELECTRICAL INSPECTIONS 



TYPE 



1979 
134 
726 
133 
280 
726 



1980 
155 
133 
71 
221 
580 



1981 
102 
137 
69 
253 
561 



New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boilers, etc.) 



New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boilers, etc.) 



New Dwellings 
Alterations & Additions 
Commercial & Industrial 
Others (Services, boilers, etc.) 



FEES COLLECTED 

$ 6,305.00 

2,261.00 

10,073.00 

5,572.50 

$24,211.50 



$ 8,525.00 

2,593.00 

11,044.00 

4,304.00 

$26,466.00 



$ 5,410.00 

2,150.00 

17,504.00 

5,985.00 

$31,049.00 



: 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION ; 

The inspection and enforcement of plumbing and gas installation is controlled 
a State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code formulated by the Board of State Examiners of 
Plumbers and Gas Fitters under authority of Chapter 142 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The Office of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector in the Building Inspection Divisi 
of the Department of Community Development and Planning is the Administrative Authc 
ity authorized by Chapter 142 of the General Laws to enforce the provisions of code 
as adapted and amended by the Board of State Examiners. 

The codes are founded upon certain principles of sanitation and safety through 
properly designed, acceptably installed, and adequately maintained systems to pro- 
tect health and safety of people everywhere. 

In addition to inspection, all applications must be reviewed and issued beforej 
any work can be started. Complaints and violations must also be investigated and 
corrected or reported to the proper authorities. 

Following is a tabulation of all permits issued for the years 1977 through 191 
and fees collected. 

PLUMBING INSPECTIONS 





NEW 


REPAIRS & 






CALENDAR YEAR 


BUILDINGS 


REMODELING 


TOTAL PERMITS 


FEES 


1977 


209 


105 


314 


$4,385 


1978 


215 


113 


328 


5,354 


1979 


121 


205 


326 


6,394 


1980 


139 


51 


290 


7,648 


1981 


20 


288 


308 


9,164 






GAS INSPECTIONS 




CALENDAR YEAR 


NEW BUILDINGS 


OTHER 


TOTAL PERMITS 


FEES 


1977 


87 


69 


156 


$1,048 


1978 


132 


49 


181 


1,176 


1979 


48 


252 


300 


3,000 


1980 


84 


227 


311 


2,700 


1981 


23 


185 


208 


2,129 



28 



HE PLANNING BOARD: 



During 1981, the Planning Board held 32 meetings. The Board approved a total 
four definitive subdivision plans creating 87 new residential lots. In addition, 
|he Board approved two preliminary subdivision plans; both were ultimately followed 
y definitive plans. One Special Permit to Cluster was granted by the Board. Forty- 
our plans not requiring approval by the Board were so certified, totalling 72 lots, 
hree public improvement/performance bonds were established and posted in the amount 
f $72,100, releasing 32 lots for sale and development. 

The Board reported on 58 Warrant Articles during 1981. Ten of the Articles 
ere amendments to the Zoning Bylaw and six were adopted by Town Meeting. One 
mendment Town Meeting adopted was the proposal to convert Rental Multi-Family to 
ondominiums. Although Town Meeting voted to adopt this proposal, the Attorney 
eneral did not approve the proposal. Also, the proposal for a multi-family overlay 
istrict was defeated by Town Meeting. Three of the Bylaw amendments dealt with 
oning changes. Only one was approved by Town Meeting. 

ONSERVATION COMMISSION: 



etlands Protection Act 



Enforcement of the Wetlands Protection Act continues to occupy most of the time 
f the Conservation Commission and its staff. Forty Notices of Intent were filed 
uring the year 1981 for projects related to wetlands. Of these, five required more 
han one public hearing. Of the thirty-nine Orders of Conditions issued, four were 
ppealed and resolution of the issues raised is still pending. Pole Hill (Waterford 
lace) is among these projects with its Order of Conditions under appeal. 

Seven "Cease and Desist Orders" were issued for violations of Chapter 131, 
ection 40. Some projects required repeated inspections modifications of Orders and 
egotiations with applicants. Included among the projects are a number of major in- 
lustrial and commercial sites with complex hydrological problems, such as the 
hattuck-Digital site (Old River Road - Rte . 93), the Channel Building-Physical 
ciences site (Osgood Street) , the MerchCO site (Shattuck Road) , the Instrumentation 
ab site (Burtt Road) , the Hewlett-Packard site (River Road) , the Shawsheen Plaza 
ite (North Main Street) and the Koala Inn on River Road and Route 93. 

and Acquisition 



Andover ' s active conservation land acquisition program, begun in 1967, has 
esulted in preservation of some 900 acres under the custody of the Conservation 
ommission. Recent efforts have been concentrated in water supply sheds. 

The following additions were made in 1981: 

1) Two more lots in the Forest Hills Subdivision, off Sugarbush Lane, (1 gift 
- 1 by purchase) total 2 acres. 

2) Gift of "green area" off Apple Blossom Circle; 7 acres. 

3) Gift off Rattlesnake Hill Road (Countryside Subdivision); 4h acres. 

4) Tax title transfer of small lot abutting above green area to Countryside. 

5) Gift of land at 9 Apple Tree Lane; Needham Property. 

6) Gift of land off Salem Street abutting Harold Parker State Forest including 
frontage on pond; 3h acres. 

The Town was unsuccessful in negotiating the exchange of Pole Hill in Ballard- 
vale for the so-called Tea Lots across Woburn Street from the South School, and the 
development of Pole Hill is therefore proceeding. 

Self-Help Funds in the amount of $27,000 were received by the Town for 25% of 

29 



of the purchase price of the Forest Hills - Fish Brook Acquisition of 1980. 
Maps; Zoning 






Under discussion during 1981 were certain problems associated with definitio 
of wetlands boundaries. The Commission is considering the adoption of policy and 
procedure to allow for correction of errors for re-delineation of areas where wet- 
lands have been physically altered and for refinement of borders on a site-specif: 
basis. The scale of the maps and the field methods used to define wetlands in 
1978-1979 were such that correction and refinement may be necessary when for in- 
stance the maps are used to determine whether a proposed sewage disposal system i£ 
the required distance from the wetland. 

The maps have proved themselves to be surprisingly accurate and useful, not- 
withstanding the above comments. They have predicted problems and have been inva] 
uable as a planning aide. The Commission hopes to be able to prepare and propose 
some form of water supply protection bylaw based on the maps, in the forthcoming 
year. 

The Town found another important use for the wetlands maps apropos of Andovei 
1981 revaluation for local property tax purposes. Many landowners requested revi- 
sion of their valuations based on the impact of wetlands on their properties. The 
revaluation team reviewed all such requests using the wetlands maps to determine tl 
area of wetlands and revised their valuations accordingly. 

Assessment of Open Land 

The Commission has attempted to advise landowners regarding possible ways to 
reduce the tax burden on open land. It participated in a forum ogranized by the 
League of Women Voters in November, with Attorney Judith Pickett of the Conservati 
Law Foundation as speaker, at which the various statutes permitting lowered assess 
ments (agricultural, forestry, public recreation land uses) and Conservation Restr 
tions and gifts for conservation purposes were explained. It is prepared to help 
landowners to explore various alternatives for the use or preservation of open lar 

Management and Utilization 

The Conservation Commission appointed a Land Management Subcommittee in Augus 
This Committee has been extremely active, visiting everyone of the more than 60 
separate conservation parcels throughout the Town. It anticipates the issuance of 
report on management policy and recommendations for its implementation early in 19 
In November, it sponsored a hike from the Christian Formation Center on the Merri 
mack near the Tewksbury Line to the Shawsheen River at its Central Street crossing 

David Dargie, Temporary Assistant Conservation Aide, has been instrumental ir 
the promotion of sound management and utilization practices for conservation land. 

The Commission recommended the appointment of twenty new Overseers during 198 
who have been assigned to various reservations by the Land Management Committee 

Norman Tisbert of Greenwood Road continues to utilize various open lands unde 
the control of the Conservation Commission for agricultural purposes. 

Community Gardens are actively cultivated on the former Shlakis property off | 
Brundrett Avenue. 

Agriculture 

The Conservation Commission sought Town Meeting approval of Town participatio 
with the State in the purchase of two Agricultural Preservation Restrictions: Turn 
Farm off South Main Street and Dargoonian off Blanchard Road. Turner Farm A.P.R. 
was turned down by the voters and the property has since been subdivided for resi- 
dential development. The Town voted to aid in the purchase of the Dargoonian A. P. 
which the State is now processing. 

30 






: 



:her Natural Resource Issues 



The Commission and its staff participated in exploring the gypsy moth problem 
id in preparing a report and recommendations to the Townspeople. 



The Staff of the Commission are members of the Merrimack River Watershed Coun- 
cil's Board of Overseers and have been active in that organization's meetings and 
ecisions. The Council hopes to establish a revolving fund for the purchase of land 
C conservation restrictions to preserve and protect the natural resources along the 
arrimack. 

The Commission and its staff have attended hearings and made comments on the 
roposed new Rules and Regulations to be issued pursuant to the Wetlands Protection 
zt, which have been the subject of much discussion and controversy. Issuance is 
till pending; the new regulations may alter considerably the jurisdiction and pro- 
adures of Conservation Commission relative to wetlands regulation. 

The Conservation Staff attended an eight-session course in Urban Hydrology 
-luring the winter months. 

3ARD OF HEALTH: 



:.c 



The Andover Board of Health continued its emphasis on improvement of its ad- 
inistrative, regulatory and policy making functions in providing and maintaining 
ealth services for the community in 1981. Issues involving environmental protec- 
ion and quality of life continue to be addressed and assigned priority by the 
oard. Other program areas targeted for improvement and upgrading include communi- 
y health education, and staff training and development. 

The full-time staff of the Health Division consists of the Director of Public 
ealth, one Registered Sanitarian, one Environmental Affairs Coordinator/Sanitarian, 
ne Public Health Nurse, and one part-time Public Health Nurse. A change in per- 
onnel was experienced in July as the Environmental Affairs Coordinator/Sanitarian, 
alter Eriksen, resigned and was replaced in that capacity by James Greer who had 
erved previously as a Health and Conservation Agent in the community of Amesbury. 
n-house training and education programs facilitated professional expansion and 
evelopment of staff capability for coping with the growing diversification of 
ealth related problems and issues. 

In May of 1981 the Board of Health sponsored Health Works '81. This free 
creening and health education program was conducted as a health fair and consisted 
f a cooperative effort among serveral community service groups and businesses in- 
luding the Andover-North Andover Y.M.C.A., the Andover School Nurses, Birch Super 
rug, McDonald's Restaurant, and Liggett Rexall Drug of Shawsheen Plaza as co- 
ponsors. Health screening was conducted for height and weight, visual acuity, 
nemia and blood analysis. Counseling and referral, and follow-up resulted in a 
uccessful effort to provide access and health education to a significant portion 
fc the Town's residents. 

A new service was instituted this year with the assistance of the Lawrence 
eneral Hospital. The program is called "Lifestyle Health Risk Appraisal". The 
bjective of "Lifestyle" is to identify and quantify lifestyle health risks, such 
s obesity, work-related stress, smoking habits, etc., and to design intervention 
trategies to reduce these risks. Among the objectives of the program are: im- 
>roved longevity , reduction in use of employee sick time, reduction of insurance 
>remiums by the Town's carrier, Blue Cross/Blue Shield. The division hopes to ex- 
>and this program to other Town departments in 1982. 

Administration and enforcement of the Massachusetts State Sanitary Code, which 
.ncludes minimum standards for food service establishments, installation of septic 
ystems, beach and swimming water facilities, and dwellings for human habitation, 
:ontinues to comprise an integral part of Board of Health duties. The Board of 
lealth has endeavored to prescribe stricter minimum standards regulating these 
functions than are required by the State Codes. The goal has been to provide a 

31 



safer and healthier environment to the Town of Andover. 

The following is a statistical summary of permit and license activity and 
revenue receipts for 1981: 



Recreation Camps 

Deep Observation Holes 

Percolation Tests 

Disposal Works Application 

Disposal Works Construction Permit 

Disposal Works Installation Permit 

Disposal Works Installer License 

Drain Layer License 

Food Service License 

Garbage Removal License 

Goat Keeping License 

Horse Stable License 

Mfg. Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts 

Store and Use Hypodermic Needles 

Massage License 

Whitlpool Bath License 

Mile and Oleo License 

Motel License 

Piggery License 

Sanitary Sewer Application 

Sanitary Sewer Connection Permit 

Building Sewer Installation Permit 

Septage Huler License 

Residential Swimming Pool Permit 

Public and Semi-Public Swimming Pool Permit 

Well Driller License 

Well Pump Installer License 

Well Water Drilling Permit 

Well Pump Installation Permit 



#Permits 




Income 


2 


$ 


40.00 


166 


4 


,150.00 


122 


3 


,050.00 


65 


1 


,625.00 


88 


2 


,200.00 


123 


2 


,545.00 


47 




940.00 


26 




525.00 


78 


3 


,075.00 


6 




30.00 


1 




5.00 


57 




320.00 


4 




20.00 


2 




1.00 


1 




5.00 


2 




100.00 


56 




137.50 


1 




25.00 


5 




10.00 


36 


1 


,800.00 


29 




625.00 


32 




750.00 


11 




220.00 


70 




350.00 


10 




150.00 


5 




125.00 


2 




50.00 


5 




75.00 


4 




75.00 



1056 



Statistical Summary : 
Sewage Disposal : 



$ 23,023.50 



Food Investigation Activity: 



Percolation Tests 122 

Soil Analysis (Water Tables) 166 

Septic System Plan Review 202 

Subdivision Plan Review (Individual) 69 

Consultations 188 

Final System Installations 112 

Sewer Connection Plan Reviews 53 

Septic System Repairs 52 

Sewer Installation Inspections 53 

Dye Tests 11 

Septic System Bed Inspections 103 

Food Facilities (Individual Insps.) 184 
Food Sanitation Course Certificates 

Granted 42 

Food Facility Plan Reviews 30 

Vending Machine Inspections 49 
Food Facility Sanitation Consultations 73 



General 



Housing Investigations 
Court Appearances 
Swimming Pools Inspected 
General Complaints 
Dump Sites (General) 
Industrial Waste Accidents 
Farm Labor Camps Inspected 



58 

5 

15 

65 

14 

3 

4 



32 



Pomps Pond Inspected 24 

Piggeries Inspected 26 

Wetland Site Visits 84 

Whirlpool Baths Inspected 4 

Well Drilling Inspections 9 

Hazardous Waste Investigations 10 

'he Andover Board of Health's program for Management of Hazardous Wastes expanded 
uring 1981. This task force consists of the Town Manager, Police Chief, Fire 
hief, Director of Public Works, Director of Public Health and Environmental Affairs 
oordinator. Accomplishments of the past year include review and comment of pro- 
osed State regulations and hazardous waste management programs, investigation and 
upervision of existing hazardous waste sites in Andover and development of a re- 
ction and notification network for review of emergency hazardous waste spills and 
ncidents. 

lhanges in the site review process for new single family residences, as well as 
ndustrial and commercial projects has facilitated a more rational approach to land 
ise and development than has existed previously. An organized system for integra- 
.ion of the Planning, Conservation, Health and Building issues review now assist 
;taff and Board members in making decisions which lead to more effective manner of 
lirecting and controlling growth. 

:LINICS: 



nfluenza: Free Influenza Vaccine (A Brazil/78, A Bangkok/79, B Singapore/79) was 



>ffered to Andover residents over sixty and over eighteen with chronic diseases, 
'wo combined flue and pneumovax clinics were held under the supervision of Stephen 
oring M.D., Board of Health physician. Volunteer nurses and registrars assisted 
it both clinics. Nursing homes and private physicians were given flu vaccine and 
vndover residents were immunized in the public health nurse's office or at home with 
i written request from their physician. 

ges Clinics 



Office 


Home 


Nursing 


Home 


Pvt. M.D. 


2 










2 


8 


2 






8 




1 




5 


14 


_3 


44 




_5 


26 


11 


47 




10 



5-19 

0-44 13 

,5-64 81 

65 328 

?otal 422 26 11 47 10 516 

'neumovax: was offered to Andover residents with chronic disease and those over 



fifty years of age for a fee of $5.00 to cover the cost of buying the vaccine, 
'wenty-six received the vaccine at the Sanborn School clinic, thirty-nine were vac- 
:inated at the clinic held at South Church. Five came to the nurse's office for 
he vaccine and two homebound residents were vaccinated in their homes by the nurse. 

amblyopia Screening Clinics (Lazy Eye Blindness) The Andonna Society offered free 



Unblyopia Screening to all Andover children three to six years of age. It was 

)art of the Pre School Screening done by the Andover School Department in April. 

\. second week of testing was offered to three and four year olds and a final week 
or appointments and others. 

Ages Boys Girls 

3 5 7 

4 55 44 

5 80 82 

6 1 2 

Total 141 135 276 



33 



Passed 251 

Referred 16 Boys and 9 Girls 
Non Referred 6 Currently under care 
Referrals requiring further treatment 6 
Referrals requiring no further treatment 4 
Referrals not returned will be followed 
up by the public health nurse if not 
returned 6 

Diabetic Screening Clinic ; Diabetic screening was offered to all Andover residents- 
over sixty in December. Seven females and three males were tested. One male and 
one female were found to have elevated blood sugar levels and were referred to the 
private physician for further testing. 

Blood Lead Screening Clinics ; Free blood lead testing is offered in the Health 
Department Clinic-Nurse's Office, twice monthly. Fourteen pre-school children wer 
tested. ip 

The Greater Lawrence Community Action Council Lead Prevention Program Outreac I I 
worker tested one hundred and fifteen Andover Nursery School children. Pediatricia 
blood lead tested twenty-four Andover children. The public health nurse followed 
eight children with E.P. elevations. 

i ur 

Measles, Mumps and Rubella Clinic : An emergency immunization clinic was held at 
Phillips Academy under the supervision of the school physician following a report 
to the Health Department of a case of rubella during the summer session. The Heal- 
Department supplied the school with vaccine and the Public Health Nurse assisted 
school medical personnel vaccinating ninety students with no documented rubella 
immunization. No new cases of rubella were reported. 

ELDERLY HEALTH PROGRAM 

The Andover Health Department sponsors free health maintenance, health promo- 
tion and disease prevention clinics for Andover residents over sixty. These clini 
are under the direction of the Public Health Nurse who is assisted by a part-time 
registered nurse, a volunteer nurse and three volunteer registrars. The clinics 
provide weight measurement, urine testing, hemaglobin testing, monitoring of vital 
signs, counseling and referral to physicians or area agencies. 

Outreach Mini Clinics : are held Tuesday from two to four p.m. four times a month 
at different sites each week. The Senior Center, Chestnut Court, Ballardvale 
United Church and Frye Circle are the four sites. Five hundred and fifty- two Ando 
ver residents over sixty attended these clinics and sixty-one were referred to 
private physicians or community agencies. 

Senior Center Clinics : are held every Wednesday from two to three p.m. These 
clinics offer primarily vital sign monitoring, counseling and referral. Eight 
hundred and one senior residents attended these clinics and ninety-four were re- 
ferred to private physicians or area agencies. 

Office Visits : Seventy-nine Andover residents visited the Public Health Nurse's 
Office for health supervision, twenty-seven received flu shots and five pneumovax 
immunizations . 

Home Visits : Thirty-three home visits were made by the Public Health Nurse to 
Andover residents over sixty years of age. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 

The Public Health Nurse investigated and completed a case record which was re- 
turned to the State Department of Public Health on the following reportable commun: 
cable diseases: 

Pertussis 1 (Whooping Cough) 
Malaria 1 Salmonella 8 Meningitis 1 
Salmonella 8 Hepatitis A 2 Rubella 1 (German Measles) 

34 



::;: 









State regulations regarding reportable diseases are implemented by the Public 
lalth Nurse. Andover residents who attend the Greater Lawrence Tuberculosis Clinic 
Ire her direct responsibility. Patients on tuberculostatic medications are moni- 
j.red monthly. Biologies and culture kits are obtained from the State Department of 
Lblic Health and dispensed by the Public Health Nurse to private physicians, 
rhools, industrial health centers and Andover residents. 

g intoux Skin Testing : Eighty-three Mantoux skin tests were done by the Public 
I;alth Nurse in her office. Three were positive and received chest x-rays and 
1)1 low-up. 

On site Mantoux tests were done at Camp Evergreen and St. Augustine's School. 
Lo positive reactors received chest x-rays and one is on tuberculostatic medication. 

Camp Merrymeeting and Camp Evergreen camper and staff health records were 
|jviewed to be sure immunizations were complete and documented according to State 
jgulations. 

CALTHWORKS 



The Public Health Nurse was responsible for obtaining volunteer nurses to work 
the health fair and providing them with medical training sessions. During the 
lir she provided nursing supervision, and participated in the counseling and 
jferral station which was short of staff and creating a problem. A foliow-up phone 
all was made by the nurse to seventy participants with abnormal test results. 
Dunseling and referral was provided as needed, the results of the phone call fol- 
3w-up were tabulated and sent to the Healthworks headquarters in Boston. 

The public health issues and problems of the coming year v/ill present important 
lallenges for your Town Board of Health and its staff. The Board will endeavor to 
irsue a course of action which will encourage healthier lifestyle, environment, and 
aality of life. T,he members of the Andover Board of Health express their sincerest 
lanks and appreciation for your continued support in these endeavors. 

DNING BOARD OF APPEALS 



The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General 
iws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapters 40A and 40B, and the Town 
/laws. The Board meets on the first Thursday of every month in the second floor 
f Memorial Hall Library. Five regular members and four associate members are 
ppointed by the Selectmen and serve without pay. The public hearings held by the 
oard of Appeals are the result of applications in the following areas: 

1. For a variance from the requirements of Bylaws; 

2. For a Special Permit under the Bylaws; 

3. By a person aggrieved by the decision of the Building Inspector or other 
administrative officer; and 

4. For permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town 
of Andover (Comprehensive Permit) . 

Prior to hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches 
equested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified, as required 
y law. The public hearings are conducted by the Chairman in conformity with the 
oard of Appeals Rules and Regulations. Following the hearing, the members of the 
oard view each property in question and thereafter hold a meeting, open to the 
ublic, at which the Board discusses the petitions which have been heard. Based on 
heir views and the evidence presented at the hearing, a decision is rendered, 
igned and filed in the Town Clerk's office. Parties in interest are notified of 
he Board's decision. 

During 1981, the Board held 12 regular meetings and considered 51 petitions, 
he Board approved 42 petitions. 

Last year it was noted in this report that the Board was concerned with the 
act that there were no providions in the Zoning Bylaw specifically relating to the 

35 



erection of towers for amateur radio antennae and wind energy conversion systems. 
As a consequence the Board had denied two petitions involving such towers. The 
situation was however remedied by the 1981 Town Meeting which voted two amendments j 
to the Bylaw dealing with these types of towers. The amendments had been drafted 
a committee of interested citizens who had been appointed by the Town Manager at t\ 
suggestion of the Board of Appeals. As a result of these amendments the Board has 
since been able to approve two petitions for the erection of wind energy conversionl rl 
systems and one for the erection of a tower for an amateur communication antennae. I s t 

At the same Town Meeting an amendment to the Bylaw proposed by the Planning 
Board now allows the Board to grant Special Permits to people who desire to modify 
single family dwellings for the purpose of adding an additional dwelling used for 
parents, in-laws, etc. 



The Board has suggested to the Planning Board and Selectmen that consideration 
should be given to the matter of the criteria to be applied by the Board in connec 
tion with petitions by hotels and industry for permission to locate helicopter pads 
on their property. 

Animal Inspection 

The following is a statistical report of the activities of the Inspector of 
Animals for the calendar year 1981. 8 j 

OIK 

No. of dogs quarantined and examined for signs of Rabies 30 

No. of dogs found to have Rabies 

No. of other animals examined for Rabies 11 

No. of animals found to have Rabies 

No. of barns inspected 60 

No. of horses 155 

No. of dairy cattle 69 

No. of beef cattle 11 

No. of Swine 419 

No. of Goats 14 

No. of Sheep 12 

No. of Calves 22 



:.:■ 



fc 



Veterans* Service 

The Department of Veterans' Services operates under Chapter 115, of the Gener; 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It provides a financial benefits progr; 
and a service program. Through a State Commissioner's office, financial benefits t( 
needy and qualified veterans and their dependents are provided for shelter, food, 
clothing, utilities, house supplies, fuel, personal needs and telephone. It also 
assists with medical, surgical, dental, hospital and nursing home care. These 
benefits are paid by the community of residence and are reimbursed by the Common- 
wealth at a rate of 50%. The greatest portion of expenditures this year went to 
assistance for unemployed veterans. This is the first time in many years unemploy- 
ment assistance exceeded hospital and medical expenditures. The service program 
provides assistance to veterans and their dependents in filing for pensions, compel 
sation, education, housing, V.A. hospitalization, vocational rehabilitation, aid ai 
assistance, home loans and burial benefits. The Federal V.A. benefits under Chapt* 
38 of the Federal Statute are paid directly to the claimants. This office works 
diligently to develop these Federal Benefits since they reflect a great savings to 
local taxpayers. 

During 1981 Legislation provided 11.2% cost of living increases in both servi( 
connected disability and indemnity compensation. It also raised from $3800.00 to 
$4400.00, the maximum grant payable towards the purchase price of an automobile or 
other conveyance for eligible veterans. The maximum amount of assistance payable 
for specially adapted housing to seriously disable veterans was increased from 
$30,000 to $32,000. Under the 1981 Veterans' Health Care Act the V.A. now provide; 
health care services to any veteran of the Vietnam Era, who, while serving in Viet- 
nam, may have been exposed to dioxin or a toxic substance in a herbicide or 

36 



tei 



isi 

;:: 



jbfoliant used for military purposes. This Act also provides health care to Veter- 
lis who were exposed to ionizing radiation from the detonation of a nuclear devise 
r the American occupation of Hiroshima or Nagasaki. 

The Veterans' Agent is also the Town Burial Agent. The law requires that all 
:2terans" graves will be properly cared for and decorated. It provides for proper 
farial of a veteran with financial assistance provided if necessary. During the 

ast year, thirty-four veterans died. Eight World War One, twenty-five World War 
Uo and one Korean veteran passed away. The dependents of these veterans were 

ssisted in making applications for the benefits to which they are entitled. 

Veterans' Day and Memorial Day Services are coordinated through this office 
ith local veterans of the American Legion Post 8 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Dst 2128. The graves of more than 1200 Veterans interred in local cemeteries are 
acorated on those holidays with a new American Flag. 

Central Purchasing 

The Central Purchasing function (serving the Town Government and Public Schools) 
as now been on stream for approximately six years and is functioning smoothly. 

Starting with fiscal year 1980, all bids are being numbered so that they can 
e identified by number, fiscal year, calendar year, and department. This is being 
one so as to tie in with the computers. 

The Office of Central Purchasing is also responsible for Insurance Coordination 
nd Risk Management for the Town of Andover (Town Government and School Department) . 
his covers the following areas: 

Entire Town Motor Vehicle Insurance 

Comprehensive Insurance (Town Liability, etc.) 

Police, Fire and Ambulance Liability 

Public Officials Liability, Town and School 

Data Processing Insurance (Equipment) , Town and School 

Workmens ' Compensation 

Blanket Policy on School Building Program 

Health and Personal Insurance is handled by the Town Treasurer's Office. In 
he spring of 1981, the total insurance package was bid to take effect July 1, 1981. 
he insurance program is now on a fiscal year basis as are all the other Town 
unctions. 

As a division of Finance and Budget, the department also handles the "Municipal 
uilding" budget and problems, "Central Services" budget and problems along with a 
umber of minor problems and questions that come up each day. 

With the increase in the bid limit that was voted in at the Spring Town Meet- 
ng, "Central Purchasing" has been able to take advantage of the competative 
uoting procedure. This has resulted in the ability to negotiate the price on many 



terns thus effecting savings for the Town. 

For the School Building Program a special set of Bid Numbers have been set 
side so as to maintain control and accurate accounting. This covers the General 
id and Major Sub-Bids. 

On the Equipment Bids for the School Building Program Phase I through IV a 
pecial and separate set of Purchase Order Numbers have been created along with a 
eparate file. 

Some examples of major bids put out by Central Purchasing in the calendar year 
981 and fiscal year 1982 to date include: 

Water Treatment Chemicals 

Electric Work and Air Conditioning System (Memorial Hall Library) 

37 



,ou 



Industrial Art Supplies 

Hydraulic Tree Sprayer 

Regular School Bus Transportation 

Uniforms for High School Marching Band 

Fire Truck 

Diesel Fuel and Range Oil 

Precast Concrete Utility Building - Recreation Park 

Plumbing Utility Building - Recreation Park 

Demolition of Stowe School Building 

Highway Salt 

k Ton Pick-Up Truck 

Office Supplies, Equipment and Furniture 

Micro-Computers (for various schools) 

Regular Bus Transportation 

Phase I - Andover School Building Program 

New Furniture and Equipment 
Phase II - Andover School Building Program 

New Furniture and Equipment 



p 



There were 2,045 orders processed for the Town Government and 5,100 orders 
processed for the School Department. 



Through the bid process, the Town now has 4 main buildings on a preventive 
maintenance program, this has been substantially effective in improving the Town's 
energy program. 



51 



In addition, there has been a number of collaborative bids with different 
communities such as: 

Heating Oils for all Town and School Buildings 
Police Vehicles 
Road Salt 

During this period, approximately 45 bid openings were held. The continued 
use of State Bids and contracts (allowed under Massachusetts General Law) has 
proven to be beneficial to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Under Chapter 40, Section 4B of the Massachusetts General Laws, two or more 
political subdivisions may jointly purchase a single item or a wide range of goods 
and services. Andover purchased rock salt for ice control on the streets in con- 
junction with seven other communities. Fuel oil for the heating of the Town and 
School Buildings is purchased in conjunction with three other communities. This 
procedure is being expanded in areas where volume procurement can show savings. 

The department is always on the search for areas of common ground whereby con 
bining dollars can be saved. 

It is not really possible to operate as a business, but every effort is beinc 
made to operate in a businesslike manner. 



"■ 



John Cornell Wood & Coal Fund 

The John Cornell Wood and Coal Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 

Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy 

poor to purchase Wood and Coal. Three trustees, chosen on a staggered basis by the 
annual Town Meeting administer the funds. 

Balance on Hand July 1, 1980 $10,167.76 

Income 1981 1,900.07 

Drawn 1980 °- 

Balance July 1, 1931 $12,067.83 

38 



si 



:: 



r 



ic 

i 



lousing Authority 

The major accomplishment of the past year (1981) was the start of construction 
1. July of forty new units for the elderly and handicapped. The project should be 
mpleted this September at a cost of one million, three hundred sixty-five dollars. 

The Andover Housing Authority, since its organization in June of 1948, has held 
:gular monthly and special meetings at the Main Office, 100 Morton Street. Regular 
etings are held on the second Thursday of the month and the Annual meeting is held 
iring the month of April. 

Thomas Eldred, a member of the Andover Housing Authority for twenty-six years, 
s re-elected by the Townspeople to serve another five year term. He was also 
;-elected by the Authority to serve as the Vice Chairman of the Board. 

At the Annual Meeting on April 8, 1981, the following officers were elected for 
one year term: Chairman, Winston A. Blake; Vice Chairman, Thomas P. Eldred; 
easurer, Thomas R. Wallace; Assistant Treasurer, Atty. Richard A. Savrann; and 
sistant Secretary, Mary Jane Powell. On September 22nd, the Secretary of Execu- 
ve Office of Communities and Development, Byron J. Matthews, appointed Francis A. 
Nulty to a five year term as the State Representative to the Andover Housing 
ithority. Mr. McNulty was a former member of the Reconstruction Finance Corpora- 
.on and a Regional Commissioner of the U.S. General Services Administration. 

It is interesting to note the dedication of these elected officials who have 
>mpiled such an enviable record of service to the Community. Mr. Thomas Wallace 

the senior member of the group with twenty-nine years of service. Thomas P. 
dred has been a member of the Authority for twenty-six years. The Chairman, 
.nston A. Blake, has nineteen years of continued service while Attorney Richard 
ivrann has served for eleven years. 

The Andover Housing Authority manages 176 elderly and 56 family units. These 
/elling units are contained in the thirty separate buildings located at Memorial 
rcle, Chestnut Court, Grandview Terrace and Frye Circle. 

This year's average monthly rent in the elderly projects was $106.00 and $173.00 
>r the family project. As a result of these low and moderate charges, the expenses 
lich are accrued by the Authority are met by a combination of rental income and a 
jmmonwealth contribution. The Town of Andover has absolutely no financial obliga- 
Lon in the construction or operation of these housing projects. 

As the private housing sector continues to experience high maintenance and 
:ility cost which must be reflected in higher rents, the Authority must face the 
lcreasing volume of pending applications from family and elderly Town residents 
io find it ever more difficult to locate housing within the realm of their income. 

The waiting list for public housing units in Andover consists of 176 elderly 
^plications and there are approximately 76 applications for family units. 

The income limits are: 

Two persons $9,280.00 

Three persons 10,440.00 

Four persons 11,600.00 

Five persons 12,325.00 

Six persons 13,050.00 

Seven persons 13,775.00 



* 



Ten new families moved into the project this year and one family moved onsite, 
ne average monthly rent is $154.00. 



39 



INCOME EXPENSES 

Rents and Interest $106,647.95 Administration $13,009.99 

Deficit Reimbursement 24,884.48 Utilities 92,605.60 

Maintenance & Labor 20,483.72 

General Expense 5,433. 12 



i': 



V. 



Total Income $131,532.43 Total Expense $131,532.43 

FRYE CIRCLE, GRANDVIEW TERRACE AND CHESTNUT COURT PROJECTS 66 7-C2 

The Ederly Housing Projects consist of 176 one bedroom units. The yearly 
income limits are: 

One person $8,120.00 

Two people 9,280.00 

The average monthly rental is $106.00. In the last twelve months, twenty 
tenants moved into these projects and five moved within the project. 

The following is a summary statement of income and expenses for these Elderly 
Projects for the last twelve months: 

INCOME EXPENSES 

Rents and Interest $227,957.82 Administration $31,563.61 

Deficit Reimbursement 16,442.33 Utilities 143,246.71 

Maintenance & Labor 59,178.66 

General Expense 10,411. 17 

Total Income $244,400.15 Total Expense $244,400.15 



r 



;c3 



:.:: 



I 
itl 



The prime objective of the Andover Housing Authority for 1982 is to start and 
finish construction of a Home for eight handicapped persons under the Commonwealth 
Chapter 689 program. The location of this new structure will be within the 200-1 
Memorial Circle project at Morton Street adjacent to the Rogers Brook. 

There are three Tenant Organizations representing all four housing projects i - : 
Andover. The Modernization Program which has proven very successful in our older 
projects is regulated by the Department of Community Affairs and provides for an 
involvement in management objectives by the Tenant Organizations. Active partici~|^ 
pation by our tenant groups has had a marked effect on the modernization work that 
has been completed as well as projects that are currently underway. 

In June of 1981 the Authority was awarded $65,000.00 for the continued upkeep^ 
and modernization of the family project, Memorial Circle. A good portion of that 
allocation will be for painting prior to the installation of storm windows and doo : 



In April of 1981 the Authority was awarded $187,000.00 by the State Departmer ' 
of Energy Resources for the conservation of heating in the family project at Memo 
rial Circle. It is estimated that fifty percent of the allocation will be for stc 
windows and doors and fifty percent for improvements to the heating system and the 
installation of free standing hot water tanks. 

Section 8 Housing Assistance Program - HUD - Federal 



This Federally subsidized program permits applicants to live in private accoir 
dations paying approximately 25% of their adjusted gross income for rent. The 
Authority makes up the difference which is payable directly to the landlord. The 
Town of Andover receives full taxes from the participating property owner. 

Most of the forty-four units allocated to the Andover Housing Authority are 
always under lease. This popular program has a waiting list of applicants, howeve 
due to the high costs of rents which frequently exceed the Fair Martet Rent schedul 
the turnover tends to reduce the waiting time to about forty-five days especially 
for those applicants that can negotiate a lease in their present apartment. 



40 






G 

;;. 

IDJ 

Si 



B kapter 707 - Department of Community Affairs 

This State subsidized program is a carbon copy of the Federal Section 8 Program, 
B; was during 1978 that this program was first implemented by the Andover Housing 
Jithority. 

This Authority was granted twenty units by the Commonwealth and the waiting 
hjriod for this popular program is about thirty days if you can negotiate a lease 
\\ your present apartment. 

hterans Project 200-1 

This project, now in its 30th year of occupancy, is a twelve building complex 
seated at Memorial Circle near Chestnut and Morton Streets. There are fifty-six 
vo, three and four bedroom units. 

Greater Lawrence Regional 
Vocational Technical High School 

The Annual Report of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical High 
hool is prepared each year in conformity with the terms of the Agreement to Estab- 
sh a Regional Vocational School District. Participating communities in the Region 
e the City of Lawrence and the Towns of Andover, North Andover and Methuen. 

The content of the Annual Report under the terms of the Agreement is to contain 
detailed financial statement for the prior year and a budget for the current year, 
rther, it is required that for each budget period there be included a statement 
owing the method by which the annual charges assessed to each member community were 
mputed. 

Lastly, along with statistical and financial data, the Regional School Committee 
y add such additional information relating to the operation and maintenance of the 
gional School as deemed necessary or appropriate. 



PROGRAM STATISTICAL REPORT 



GULAR DAY SCHOOL 



ADE 
NICIPALITY 



DOVER 
.WRENCE 
THUEN 

iRTH ANDOVER 
bjlTAL 



IADE 12 
IADE 13 
IADE 14 
)STGRADUATE 
P.N. 
)TALS 





ENROLLMENT 


OCTOBER 


1, 


1980 


PG 


PG Pre- 




9 




10 


11 




12 


13 


14 


I 


II Voc 


TOTAL 


23 




20 


27 




19 


4 


4 


2 


3 3 


105 


361 




344 


314 


276 


3 


24 


1 


6 3 


1,332 


97 




110 


86 




83 


4 


8 


2 


5 1 


396 


21 




23 


20 




9 





3 





3 


79 


502 




497 


447 


■ 


387 


11 


39 


5 


14. 10. 


1,912 






GRADUATES 


JUNE 


1981 








NUMBER 


NUMBER 




ARMED 




HIGHER 




GRADUATED 


PLACED 


SERVICES 




EDUCATION 






378 






296 






27 




55 






11 






11 
















19 






19 
















39 






38 











1 






447 






364 






27 




5_6 





41 



Courses Available for Regular Day Students (1980-81) 



Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Auto Body Repair 

Automotive Repair 

Carpentry 

Clothing and Modeling 

Commercial Art 

Culinary Art 

Data Management 

Distributive Occupations 

Drafting 

Electricity 

Electronics 

Health Service 

Heavy Equipment 



Home Management 

Machine Shop 

Major Appliance Repair 

Metal Fabrication 

Painting and Decorating 

Pipef itting 

Plant Maintenance 

Radio and T.V. 

Small Engine 

Upholstery 

Cosmetology 

Dental Assistant 

License Practical Nurse 



EVENING SCHOOL STATISTICS 



PARTICIPATION BY PROGRAM 
COURSE 

Trade Extension 

Preparatory 

Evening Practical Arts 

Novice 

Apprentice 

TOTAL 



PARTICIPATION BY COMMUNITIES 
CITY OR TOWN 

Lawrence 

Methuen 

Andover 

North Andover 

Mass. Non-Residents 

New Hampshire 

TOTAL 



SCHOOL YEAR 


1980- 


-81 






MALE 






FEMALE 


TOTAL 


257 






32 


289 


357 






124 


481 


65 






214 


279 


11 






68 


79 


103 






6 


109 


793 






444 


1,237 





332 


195 


527 




187 


131 


318 




70 


46 


116 




61 


30 


91 




104 


31 


135 




39 


11 


50 




793 


444 


1,237 


PLACEMENT OF ( 


GRADUATES 


- SCHOOL YEAR 


1980-81 


STUDENTS 




PERCENT OF 


NEW CO-OP 


EMPLOYED 


SENIOR CLASS 


AGREEMENTS 


300 




81% 


28 


320 




86% 


7 


335 




91% 


4 


339 




92% 


3 


336 




91% 


5 


339 




92% 


2 


336 




93% 


1 


341 




94% 


5 


368 




97% 


18 



September 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

June 

As of graduation day in June, 1981, over ninety-seven percent of the senior 
class had received employment. The business firms with Cooperative Work Agreements 
with the school numbered 1,095, an increase of 73 companies within one year. 

FACILITY USE 

Following a policy adopted when the school was initially built, the school hasi 
been made available to organizations within the region who desire to use many of th 
school's varied facilities. 

During the school year 1980-81 over sixty organizations used the facilities fo 1 
a total of over 2,000 hours. 

42 



FISCAL YEAR 1981 APPROVED BUDGET 
July 1, 1980 - June 30, 1981 

General Control $ 

Expense of Instruction: 

Day School $3,317,981.13 

Evening School 88, 157. 24 
Total Expense of Instruction 
Auxiliary Agencies 
Cost of Transportation 
Operation of Plant 
Maintenance of Plant 
Special Charges 
Miscellaneous 
Outlay 
Debt Retirement and Service 



148,880.27 



3,406,138.37 
214,265.46 
256,420.00 
592,312.70 
352,883.00 
310,623.00 
340,742.22 
77,500.00 
496,440.00 



FUNDS FOR REDUCTION - ESTIMATED 

School Building Assistance Bureau 

Pupil Transportation Reimbursement 

P.L. 81-874 

Chapter 70 

Regional School District Aid - Chapter 71, 

Other Funds 

Total Funds for Reduction 

NET TOTAL 



BUDGET SHARE FOR EACH MUNICIPALITY OF DISTRICT 



$ 


6,196,205 


.02 


$ 

) 


276,919 
117,117 
4,837 
2,305,056 
850,601. 
400,000. 


.00 

.00 

.00 

00 

00 

00 


$ 


3,954,530. 


00 


$ 


2,241,675. 


02 



ndover 

awrence 

ethuen 

orth Andover 



Total 
Payment 

148,254.06 

1,520,262.55 

447,749.20 

125,409.21 



PAYMENTS 



August 1 

37,063.52 

380,065.64 

111,937.30 

31,352.31 



December 1 



June 1 



$2,241,675.02 $560,418.77 



37,063.52 37,063.51 37,063.51 

380,065.64 380,065.64 380,065.63 

111,937.30 111,937.30 111,937.30 

31,352.30 31,352.30 31,352.30 

$560,418.76 $560,418.75 $560,418.74 



OPERATING FUND 
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1981 
Balance - June 30, 1980 

Add: 

Excess Revenue over Expenditures - 
(Budget) 3,658.99 

Miscellaneous Receipts - 

Schedule A 243,197.79 

Adjustment of Prior Year 

Expenditures 132.61 

Fund Balance - June 30, 1981 



$991,438.04 



246,989.39 
1,238,427.43 



43 



Public Works 



FORESTRY 

During 1981, the Forestry Division removed 121 trees ranging in size from 10' 
to over 30" in diameter. Thirty-four of the trees were removed with contractor 
assistance. 



•.: 



;t 



: 



The division planted 66 trees consisting of the following varieties: green ai 
ginko, callery pear, London planetree, column Norway maple, white pine, dwarf Japa 
nese maple, flowering cherry and dogwood. 

The division spent approximately 18% of available time pruning. Pruning con- 
sists of street-by-street pruning, problem tree pruning, storm repairs, flat-clean 
ing whole streets of undesirable vegetation, removing sight distance obstructions 
intersections and curves thus providing better visability over distances, and mair 
tenance of the shrub beds in Central Park. 

Spray operations are conducted by trained and licensed personnel using appro\ 
pesticides and methods. Operations included applications of both herbicides and 
insecticides. Herbicides were used to control weeds along guardrails, poison ivy, 
curbside weeds, and weeds in the Central Park shrub beds. Insecticides were used 
control elm bark beetles, elm leaf beetles, hornets, wasps and gypsy moths. The 
gypsy moth infestations were heavy enough to warrant spray controls. A biological 
agent, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was sprayed on roadside public shade trees in 
those areas, approximately one-fourth of the town, where gypsy moths threatened tH 
health of the trees. 

The mowing of roadside weeds is done by private contractors, and the divisior 
mows individual problems areas and some town-owned fields. During the winter mont • 
the division continues with its shade tree maintenance duties and also plows snow J 
for the Highway Division when needed. 

ENGINEERING 

Field surveys, construction plans and documents, competitive prices, field la 
outs and construction supervision were provided for the following list of projects. 

1. Water main extension on Rattlesnake Hill Road and Dundas Avenue; a 
distance of 1,600 lineal feet. 

2. Surface water drainage at the East Junior High School for the Rabbits 
Pond Brook. 



3. Seven 12 foot wide security gates at various locations. 

4. Demolition of the Ballardvale Community Building and the Stowe School 
including lot restoration. 

5. Painting of the Community Development and the Town Hall. 

6. Several small highway surface water drainage projects. 

A considerable amount of time was spent providing information to consulting 
engineers and architects on the following projects: 

1. Andover Street storm drainage and reconstruction. 

2. School Street storm drainage. 

3. Handicap ramps and restroom facilities at the Town Hall. 

44 



1. Gas Main extensions in Central Street. 

3. Telephone underground conduit extensions - River Road. 

\S . Sanitary sewer extensions for the West Andover and Dascomb Road 
industrial parks. 

For the Planning Board, preliminary and definitive plans for 4 subdivisions of 
nd with a total of 87 lots were reviewed to determine conformance with its rules 
id regulations and to ascertain the adequacy of the proposed utilities. With the 
3parture of the construction inspector from the Community Development office these 
aties were assumed by the Engineering Division. Legal descriptions for easements 
nd roadway layouts were checked before they were filed in the Registry of Deeds. 

Survey, easement and betterment plans were prepared where necessary for the 
rojects outlined above and for other proposed projects. 

The town was represented in engineering matters with the Federal, State and 
ounty governments, principally concerning TOPICS on Main Street, sewer main exten- 
ions and Chapter 90 construction. 

Many town citizens and others assisted in obtaining information about existing 
tilities, street layouts, industrial sites and other general information. 

The engineering records of the town were maintained and updated and other town 
epartments were aided in obtaining this information. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of underground utilities 
ere issued through this division. 

The engineering division of Public Works consists of three full-time employees 
ith one civil engineering student employed on a part-time basis. 

'ATER 



The Water Division of the Department of Public Works consists of 18 full-time 
mployees including the Superintendent. The division is responsible for the supply, 
reatment and distribution of drinking water to the community. The major components 
f the water system are as follows: 



Supply 



Treatment: 



Pumping Stations 



Distribution System: 



Distribution Water Mains 



Haggetts Pond 
Fish Brook 
Merrimack River 
Abbott Well 

Water Filtration Plant 

Chlorination Facilities - Fish Brook 

Water Filtration Plant 
Fish Brook 
Bancroft Road 
Abbott Well 

Storage Reservoirs: 
Bancroft Road 
Prospect Hill 
Wood Hill 

175 Miles 



Since the dedication in October 1974, of the Water Filtration Plant at Haggetts 

Pond, the staff has conducted numberous tours for students in all grades of the 

\ndover School System, colleges throughout New England, various local clubs and 
/isitors from all over the world. 

45 



The total water pumped to the system from January 1, 1981 through December 31 
1981 was 1,522,244,000 gallons. The average daily pumping was 4,170,532 gallons 
with a maximum day of 8,324,000 gallons occurring on June 17, 1981. 

Repairs : House service leaks repaired - 25 

Water main breaks repaired - 12 

Hydrants : Hydrants repaired or replaced - 6 

New hydrants installed - 5 

SEWER 






:: 



:• 



:."'• 



The Sewer Division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for the 
operation and maintenance of the wastewater pumping stations on Dale Street in 
Ballardvale, Bridle Path Road, West Elementary School, Riverina Road in Shawsheen 
and the entire system of sanitary sewers. 

The sewerage system includes 62 miles of sanitary sewers and 4184 connections. 
The Riverina Road pumping station discharges by means of a force main through the 
City of Lawrence to the Merrimack River. The raw sewage discharge from Riverina 
Road is collected and treated by the Greater Lawrence Sanitary District's Regional 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

In the past year, the sewer division freed 20 blockages in sewer mains and 63 
private sewer services. Approximately 200 calls for assistance from homeowners wit 
private sewer service problems were answered. 

The sewer maintenance program continues to show increasingly good results, wit 
weekly and monthly inspections of certain sections of sewers that because of rela- 
tively flat slopes and low velocity cause plugging problems. 



r. 



HIGHWAY 

During the period of June 16, 1981 through September 10, 1981, 105 streets wer 
treated with asphalt and sand for a total of approximately 36 miles. 

Haverhill Street (High St. to town line) and High Street (from Haverhill St. t 
town line) were resurfaced with an overlay of bituminous concrete. 

Clean Up 

During the spring and summer, two sweepers are kept busy in continuous cleanin 
of all streets after the winter sanding. One sweeper starts each morning at 5:00 
A.M., prior to the awakening of the business community. 

Leaf Pick-Up 

This service was discontinued. 

Inspection 

The Highway Division assists the Engineering Division on its inspection of the 
conditions of new streets before they are accepted as public ways. The Highway 
Division also provides men and equipment for all other divisions when needed. 

Sidewalks 

Sidewalks were maintained as required. 

Storm Drains 

Storm drains, brooks and catchbasins were cleaned and kept free of all debris. 
Some 86 basins were repaired; deterioration and damage mostly caused by frost and 
icy conditions during the winter season. 

46 



I 



:j; 



iow & Ice Control 



The Highway Division with the help and cooperation of all other divisions of the 
blic Works Department is also responsible for snow removal and ice control includ- 
g flood control for *all Town roads. 

HICLE MAINTENANCE 



This division of Public Works Department is vested with the responsibility of 
oviding complete maintenance for all Public Works Department vehicles, of the var- 
us divisions that include Engineering, Water, Sewer, Highway, Parks, Forestry, 
lid Waste and Cemetery. The Recreation and Haven vehicles are also serviced by this 
vision. 

This division maintains a supply of fuel (diesel fuel) and gasoline including 
.bricants for the above-mentioned divisions in addition to providing gasoline for 
ie school department. As prescribed by statutory law, all vehicles must be inspect- 
l biannually and necessary repairs are accomplished in order to maintain State 
.andards for safety. 

An Inspection Station, approved and licensed was granted by the Registry of 
tor Vehicles and is in effect for the first time as of April 1980. 

This division is also responsible for the acquisition of replacement vehicles. 

RKS 



The Paiks Division during the early spring, repaired and painted all benches and 
>rtable bleachers. Repaired all backstops for baseball and softball. 

The High School baseball, the Junior High and Elementary School fields were 
iked, rol